Author Topic: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother  (Read 446 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Lesson 4 January 15-21






Jesus, Our Faithful Brother





Commentary in Navy                  Inspiration in Maroon









Sabbath Afternoon


Read for This Week’s Study: Lev. 25:25–27; Heb. 2:14–16; Heb. 11:24–26; 1 Cor. 15:50; Heb. 5:8, 9; Heb. 12:1–4.

Memory Text: Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, He also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death He might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil.” Hebrews 2:14

Why did Jesus come in the "likeness of sinful flesh"?  To give us an example that we too can become a "partaker of the divine nature" and escape the captivity of sin that binds all who are not born again of His Spirit. "Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust." 2 Peter 1:4.


Hebrews 1 talks of Jesus as the Son of God, the ruler over the angels, and “the brightness of His glory and the express image of His person” (Heb. 1:3, NKJV). In Hebrews 2, Jesus is the Son of man, who was made lower than the angels and who adopted human nature with all its frailty, even to the point of death (Heb. 2:7).

In Hebrews 1, God says about Jesus: “You are My Son” (Heb. 1:5, NKJV). In Hebrews 2, Jesus refers to human children as His “brethren” (Heb. 2:12).

In Hebrews 1, the Father declares the Son’s divine sovereignty (Heb. 1:8-12). In Hebrews 2, the Son affirms His faithfulness to the Father (Heb. 2:13).

In Hebrews 1, Jesus is the divine Lord, Creator, Sustainer, and Sovereign. In Hebrews 2, Jesus is the human high priest, merciful and faithful.

In summary, the description of Jesus as a faithful and merciful brother is depicted in the description of the Son as the ultimate manifestation of the eternal, creator God (Heb. 1:1-4).

That is correct, while Jesus had a fallen nature, He never sinned. He was holy. How can that be? It ought not be a surprise. Why then are there so many teachers who teach since we live in fallen flesh we cannot obey the commandments of God? Because Satan has stolen a march on the church in the same manner he deceived Israel so that even the disciples did not understand Jesus had to suffer and die that their sins might be forgiven, even after being with Him for 3 1/2 years. Satan is so very clever. We can keep His commandments even though Satan has charged God with being unfair in requiring that we keep them. Satan is the one who claims we cannot keep His law because we live in fallen flesh. It is true that we live in fallen flesh. We do not believe we can have holy flesh this side of the second coming of our Savior when all who love Him supremely will be transformed into holy flesh.

Fallen flesh is not an excuse for sin. Whoever says it is, is a liar following the teachings of Satan himself who began the lie. When we are  born again of the Spirit we become partakers of God's divine nature because we have invited the Holy Spirit to take possession of the heart. As long as we cling to Jesus, we are empowered to keep His commandments. And, we will reveal in fallen flesh all of the fruits of the Spirit. We will manifest love, joy, and peace even in the middle of the storm.


Study this week’s lesson to prepare for Sabbath, January 22.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Sunday         January 16
The Brother as a Redeemer
https://remnant-online.com/smf/Themes/anecdota_2_0/images/bbc/bold.gif
Read Leviticus 25:25-27, 47-49. Who could redeem a person who had lost his property or his liberty because of poverty?

The law of Moses stipulated that when a person was so poor that he had to sell his property — or even himself — in order to survive, he would receive that property or his liberty back every fifty years, on the jubilee year. The jubilee year was a “grand” Sabbath year in which debts were forgiven, properties reclaimed, and liberty proclaimed to the captives.

If the Jubilee was 50 years away, it would do little for a 40 year old who lost his land. Then for what purpose the Jubilee? It was not for the one who either fell upon bad times or  squandered what God had given them, as it was for the children. By returning the land to the family, the parents could not squander the inheritance of the children. The Jews were not given a socialist economy, it was a free economy with restrictions such as the Jubilee. If a healthy man did not work, he did not eat. It was a good pattern for economies today, but that will never be. But, it can be a pattern for families in that if they would buy land capable of producing a crop, the family would have a means to support themselves when bad times come. And bad times will come, are even here today.


Fifty years was a long time to wait, however. That’s why the Law of Moses also stipulated that the nearest relative could pay the part that was still owed and, thus, ransom his relative much sooner.

The nearest relative was also the one who guaranteed that justice was done in the case of a murder. He was the avenger of the blood who would pursue the murderer of his close relative and punish him (Num. 35:9-15).

Read Hebrews 2:14-16. How are Jesus and we described in this passage?

This passage describes us as slaves of the devil, but Jesus as our Redeemer. When Adam sinned, human beings fell under the power of Satan. As a result, we did not have the power to resist sin (Rom. 7:14-24). Worse, there was a death penalty that our transgression required, which we could not pay (Rom. 6:23). Thus, our situation was apparently hopeless.

Jesus, however, adopted our human nature and became flesh and blood like us. He became our nearest relative and redeemed us. He was not ashamed to call us “brothers” (Heb. 2:11, ESV).

Paradoxically, by taking our nature and redeeming us, Jesus revealed His divine nature, as well. In the Old Testament, the true redeemer of Israel, their closest relative, is Yahweh (e.g., Ps. 19:14, Isa. 41:14, Isa. 43:14, Isa. 44:22, Jer. 31:11, Hos. 13:14).

What are ways that you can learn to experience more deeply that reality of just how close Christ can be to you? Why is having this experience so important to your faith?

We can only have power to resist the smallest temptation by abiding in Jesus and He in us. If we do not have an intimate relationship by being filled with the Holy Spirit, we cannot keep the law of God, neither will we have eternal life. We need an experience of continual surrender of the whole heat, else we will sin. Hebrews 4:14-16.  "Seeing then that we have a great high priest, that is passed into the heavens, Jesus the Son of God, let us hold fast [our] profession. For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as [we are, yet] without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need."  When we love God supremely, we will be partaking of His divine nature (2 Peter 1:4).

Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Monday         January 17
Not Ashamed to Call Them Brothers


Hebrews says that Jesus was not ashamed to call us His brethren (Heb. 2:11). Despite being one with God, Jesus embraced us as part of His family. This solidarity contrasts with the public shaming that the readers of Hebrews suffered in their communities (Heb. 10:33).

Read Hebrews 11:24-26.

 11:24   By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh's daughter; 
 11:25   Choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; 
 11:26   Esteeming the reproach of Christ greater riches than the treasures in Egypt: for he had respect unto the recompense of the reward. 


In what way do Moses’ decisions exemplify what Jesus did for us?

Jesus left a world where we all desire to obtain  that we might live....at the risk of failure and eternal loss. So, did Moses leave a world of ease and pleasure that he might receive a greater reward, to live in the world Jesus left.


Have you imagined what it meant for Moses to be called “the son of Pharaoh’s daughter”? He was a powerful figure in the most powerful empire of the time. He received the highest civil and military training and became a remarkable character. Stephen says that Moses was “mighty in words and in deeds” (Acts 7:22). Ellen G. White also says that he was “a favorite with the armies of Egypt” and that Pharaoh “determined to make his adopted grandson his successor on the throne” (see Patriarchs and Prophets, p. 245). Yet, Moses abandoned all of this privilege when he chose to identify himself with the Israelites, a slave nation without education and power.

Read Matthew 10:32, 33; 2 Timothy 1:8, 12; and Hebrews 13:12-15. What does God ask from us?

This was part of the problem for the readers of Hebrews. After suffering persecution and rejection, many of them began to feel ashamed of Jesus. By their actions some were in danger of putting Jesus “to an open shame” instead of honoring Him (Heb. 6:6). Thus, Paul constantly calls the readers to “hold fast” the “confession” of their faith (Heb. 4:14, Heb. 10:23, NKJV).

God wants us to recognize Jesus as our God and our brother. As our Redeemer, Jesus has paid our debt; as our brother, Jesus has shown us the way that we should live in order that we will “be conformed to the image of his Son, [so] that he might be the firstborn among many brethren” (Rom. 8:29).

Think for a moment on the decision that Jesus had to make in order to embrace us as “siblings.” Why was what Jesus did so much more condescending to Himself than what Moses did, and what does this teach us about God’s love for us?

We marvel at the Saviour’s sacrifice in exchanging the throne of heaven for the manger, and the companionship of adoring angels for the beasts of the stall. Human pride and self-sufficiency stand rebuked in His presence. Yet this was but the beginning of His wonderful condescension. It would have been an almost infinite humiliation for the Son of God to take man’s nature, even when Adam stood in his innocence in Eden. But Jesus accepted humanity when the race had been weakened by four thousand years of sin. Like every child of Adam He accepted the results of the working of the great law of heredity. What these results were is shown in the history of His earthly ancestors. He came with such a heredity to share our sorrows and temptations, and to give us the example of a sinless life.
 
Satan in heaven had hated Christ for His position in the courts of God. He hated Him the more when he himself was dethroned. He hated Him who pledged Himself to redeem a race of sinners. Yet into the world where Satan claimed dominion God permitted His Son to come, a helpless babe, subject to the weakness of humanity. He permitted Him to meet life’s peril in common with every human soul, to fight the battle as every child of humanity must fight it, at the risk of failure and eternal loss.  Desire of Ages; pg 49.



Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Tuesday          January 18
Flesh and Blood Like Us


Hebrews says that Jesus adopted our human nature so that He could represent us and could die for us (Heb. 2:9, 14-16; Heb. 10:5-10). Here is the foundation of the plan of salvation and our only hope for eternal life.

Read Matthew 16:17, Galatians 1:16, 1 Corinthians 15:50, and Ephesians 6:12. To what deficiencies of human nature do these passages relate the expression “flesh and blood”?

The expression “flesh and blood” emphasizes the frailty of the human condition, its weakness (Eph. 6:12), lack of understanding (Matt. 16:17, Gal. 1:16), and subjection to death (1 Cor. 15:50). Hebrews says that Jesus was made like His brothers “in all things” (Heb. 2:17). This expression means that Jesus became fully human (NIV). Jesus did not simply “look like” or “seem to be” human; He truly was human, truly one of us.

Hebrews also says, however, that Jesus was different from us regarding sin. First, Jesus did not commit any sin (Heb. 4:15). Secondly, Jesus had a human nature that was “holy, innocent, unstained, separated from sinners” (Heb. 7:26, ESV).

There are some real problems when we do not study for ourselves. Here is the statement from Hebrews 7:26. It does not state the nature of Christ at all. "For such an high priest became us, [who is] holy, harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens." this is not a statement of his human nature any more than when Peter tells us to be holy. “Gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and hope to the end for the grace that is to be brought unto you at the revelation of Jesus Christ; ... not fashioning yourselves according to the former lusts in your ignorance: but as He which hath called you is holy, so be ye holy in all manner of conversation; because it is written, Be ye holy; for I am holy.”

God has commanded us, “Be ye holy; for I am holy;” and an inspired apostle declares that without holiness “no man shall see the Lord.” Holiness is agreement with God. By sin the image of God in man has been marred and well-nigh obliterated; it is the work of the gospel to restore that which has been lost; and we are to cooperate with the divine agency in this work. And how can we come into harmony with God, how shall we receive His likeness, unless we obtain a knowledge of Him? It is this knowledge that Christ came into the world to reveal unto us. { 5T 743.1}


It is not my desire to argue over the nature of Christ, but even though He came in the likeness of sinful flesh, He did not sin. His dual nature empowered Him to not sin. So it will be with all who become partakers of His divine nature, they will not sin. Jesus is the only One who has never sinned. This does not mean He did  not share our fallen nature. Having a fallen nature is not an excuse for sin, even though many ministers in God's church have taught that. "Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust." 2 Peter 1:4. When we are filled with the Holy Spirit  we are empowered to keep the commandments of God. "Here is the patience of the saints: here [are] they that keep the commandments of God, and the faith of Jesus." Rev 14:12.


We all have sinned, and we all have evil tendencies. Our bondage to sin begins deep inside our own very nature. We are “carnal, sold under sin” (Rom. 7:14; see also Rom. 7:15-20). Pride and other sinful motivations often taint even our good actions. Jesus’ nature, however, was not marred by sin. It had to be this way. If Jesus had been “carnal, sold under sin,” like us, He would have also needed a Savior. Instead, Jesus came as a Savior and offered Himself as a sacrifice “without blemish” to God for us (Heb. 7:26-28, Heb. 9:14, ESV).

Then Jesus destroyed the power of the devil by dying as the sinless offering for our sins, thus making possible our forgiveness and reconciliation with God (Heb. 2:14-17). Jesus also broke the power of sin by giving us the power to live a righteous life through His fulfillment of the new covenant promise to write the law in our hearts (Heb. 8:10). Thus, Jesus has defeated the enemy and effectively liberated us so that we can now “serve the living God” (Heb. 9:14). Satan’s final destruction, meanwhile, will come at the final judgment (Rev. 20:1-3, 10).

Yes, Jesus gives us the power to live a "righteous life." What does that mean? It means when He abides in us (we partake of His divine nature), we have power to keep His laws. We do not sin. If we let go of Him, we cannot help but sin. Jesus did not give up His divine nature when He took our fallen nature. Thus, He had two natures as we may have two natures when we are reconciled to God. When we are filled with the Holy Spirit, we have power to not sin. If we do not have the Holy Spirit in our hearts, then we will sin. We are none of His unless we have the Spirit in our hearts. "But ye are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if so be that the Spirit of God dwell in you. Now if any man have not the Spirit of Christ, he is none of His." Romans 8:9. Jesus was holy and undefiled. He never sinned even in fallen flesh. You may also cease to sin if you remain in Christ. If this was not so, then the sanctuary in heaven could never be  cleansed because you will keep sinning.

Since we have the promise of victory through Jesus, why do so many of us still struggle with sin? What are we doing wrong, and more importantly, how can we start living up to the high calling we have in Christ?

The author is telling us that we can cease sinning if we quit doing what is wrong. What must I do in order to attain to the holiness God requires in order to enter heaven? "How can we start living up to the high calling we have in Christ?"


Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Wednesday          January 19
Perfected Through Sufferings


Read Hebrews 2:10, 17, 18 and Hebrews 5:8, 9. What was the function of suffering in Jesus’ life?

 2:10   For it became him, for whom [are] all things, and by whom [are] all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings. 
  2:17   Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto [his] brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things [pertaining] to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people. 
 2:18   For in that he himself hath suffered being tempted, he is able to succour them that are tempted.

 5:8   Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered; 
 5:9   And being made perfect, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him; 
 


The apostle says that God made Jesus “perfect through sufferings.” This expression is surprising. The author has said that Jesus is “the radiance of the glory of God and the exact imprint of his nature” (Heb. 1:3, ESV) and that He is sinless, spotless, undefiled, and holy (Heb. 4:15, Heb. 7:26-28, Heb. 9:14, Heb. 10:5-10). Jesus did not have to overcome any kind of moral or ethical imperfection. He was perfect both morally and ethically.

Hebrews does say, however, that Jesus underwent a process of “perfecting” that provided Him with the means to save us. Jesus was perfected in the sense that He was equipped to be our Savior.

1. Jesus was “perfected” through sufferings in order to become the Captain of our salvation (Heb. 2:10). Jesus had to die on the cross as a sacrifice so that the Father could have the legal means to save us. Jesus was the perfect sacrificial offering, the only one. As God, Jesus could judge us; but, because of His sacrifice, Jesus can also save us.

2. Jesus learned obedience through sufferings (Heb. 5:8 ). Obedience was necessary for two things. First, obedience made His sacrifice acceptable (Heb. 9:14, Heb. 10:5-10). Second, His sufferings enabled Him to become our example (Heb. 5:9). Jesus “learned” obedience because He never experienced it before. As God, whom would He have to obey? As the eternal Son, and one with God, He was obeyed as the ruler of the universe. Therefore, Jesus did not progress from disobedience to obedience, but from sovereignty and dominion to submission and obedience. The exalted Son of God became the obedient Son of Man.

3. Suffering temptation and being victorious enabled Jesus to be a merciful and faithful High Priest (Heb. 2:17, 18 ). Sufferings did not make Jesus more merciful. To the contrary, it was because of Jesus’ mercy that He volunteered to die on the cross to save us to begin with (Heb. 10:5-10; compare with Rom. 5:7, 8 ). Yet, it was through sufferings that the reality of Jesus’ brotherly love was truly expressed and revealed.

Jesus was always obedient. So what does the verse mean when it says He learned obedience? When Romans 5:3-5 tells us we glory in our tribulation, for tribulation worketh patience....  Those who are fully surrendered are already patient, just as Jesus was already obedient. It means that He will grow in His ability to obey at a higher level, just as we will become more patient through out tribulation. There are conditions for us, since we understand not all will become more patient when being tried. We must abide in Jesus for power to endure suffering. Jesus was always fully surrendered to His Father, so He grew in strength to obey. He continued to grow in strength until He was ready to suffer for the whole of humanity.


If the sinless Jesus suffered, we, as sinners, surely will suffer, as well. How can we learn to endure the tragedies of life while at the same time drawing hope and assurance from the Lord, who has revealed His love to us in so many powerful ways?

The answer is always the same, we must love the Lord our God with the whole heart, with all we are and all we have. Then we shall have spiritual discernment to understand why we joy in our tribulation. "And not only [so], but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; And patience, experience; and experience, hope: And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us." Romans 5:3-5

When we live to glorify God, we will happily suffer for His sake. We are to be His witnesses of the power of His love to transform sinners into saints. And so it was with Jesus. We learn in the same manner as did Jesus. He could not carry the sins of the world when He was a child, nor when He was a young man of 18. He had to learn and gain an experience so that He could endure the suffering. Through suffering we are made stronger as Jesus was made stronger. Our faith in God grows. It was the knowledge of His Father's love and character that enabled Jesus to carry our sins. He trusted in His Father. "Amid the awful darkness, apparently forsaken of God, Christ had drained the last dregs in the cup of human woe. In those dreadful hours He had relied upon the evidence of His Father’s acceptance heretofore given Him. He was acquainted with the character of His Father; He understood His justice, His mercy, and His great love. By faith He rested in Him whom it had ever been His joy to obey. And as in submission He committed Himself to God, the sense of the loss of His Father’s favor was withdrawn. By faith, Christ was victor." Desire of Ages; pg 756.





Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Thursday         January 20
The Brother as a Model


Another reason why Jesus adopted our human nature and lived among us was so that He could be our example, the only one who could model for us what is the right way to live before God.

Yes, He was the only Holy One without sin, but we are to witness the power of grace to transform sinners into saints. It is very true that when we sin, we do not set a good example. "The conversion of sinners and their sanctification through the truth is the strongest proof a minister can have that God has called him to the ministry. The evidence of his apostleship is written upon the hearts of those converted, and is witnessed to by their renewed lives. Christ is formed within, the hope of glory. A minister is greatly strengthened by these seals of his ministry.

Today the ministers of Christ should have the same witness as that which the Corinthian church bore to Paul’s labors. But though in this age there are many preachers, there is a great scarcity of able, holy ministers—men filled with the love that dwelt in the heart of Christ. Pride, self-confidence, love of the world, faultfinding, bitterness, envy, are the fruit borne by many who profess the religion of Christ. Their lives, in sharp contrast to the life of the Saviour, often bear sad testimony to the character of the ministerial labor under which they were converted.  AA 328.


Read Hebrews 12:1-4. According to the apostle, how should we run the race of the Christian life?

In this passage Jesus is the culmination of a long list of characters whom the apostle provides as exemplars of faith. This passage calls Jesus “the founder and perfecter of our faith” (ESV). The Greek word archegos (“founder”) can also be translated “pioneer.” Jesus is the pioneer of the race in the sense that He runs ahead of the believers. In fact, Hebrews 6:20 calls Jesus our “forerunner.” The word “perfecter” gives the idea that Jesus had displayed faith in God in the purest form possible. This passage teaches both that Jesus is the first one to have run our race with success and that He is the one who perfected the art of what living by faith is all about.

Hebrews 2:13 reads: “And again: ‘I will put My trust in Him.’ And again: ‘Here am I and the children whom God has given Me’ ” (NKJV). What is happening here is that Jesus said that He would put His trust in God. This reference is an allusion to Isaiah 8:17, 18.

Isaiah spoke these words in the face of a terrible threat of invasion from Northern Israel and Syria (Isa. 7:1, 2). His faith contrasted the lack of faith of Ahaz, the king (2 Kings 16:5-18). God had exhorted Ahaz to trust in Him and to ask a sign that He would deliver him (Isa. 7:1-11). God had already promised him, as a son of David, that He would protect Ahaz as His own son. Now, God graciously offered Ahaz to confirm that promise with a sign. Ahaz, however, refused to ask for a sign and, instead, sent messengers to Tiglath-pileser, king of Assyria, saying, “I am your servant and your son” (2 Kings 16:7, NKJV). How sad! Ahaz preferred being “son” of Tiglath-pileser than the son of God.

Jesus, however, put His trust in God and in His promise that He will put His enemies under His feet (Heb. 1:13; Heb. 10:12, 13). God has made the same promise to us, and we need to believe Him, just as Jesus did (Rom. 16:20).

How can we learn to put our trust in God but by daily making choices that reflect this trust? What’s the next important choice you need to make, and how can you make sure it does reveal trust in God?

The answer is always the same, we need to love the Lord our God with all the heart, mind, soul, and strength. Until we know Him intimately, how can we give all to Him, how can we trust someone we do not know? We can't. Therefore, we must gird up our loins and spend time getting to know God. It would indeed be well to spend a thoughtful hour a day contemplating the life of Christ. Why? Why not? Do we want to know Him? Do we want to trust Him with all we have and all we are? Then we must drink His blood and eat His flesh. Faith commeth by hearing and hearing by the Word. Why? Because the Word was made flesh. The Word is a revelation of the character of Jesus. And Jesus said, "If you have seen me, you have seen the Father." Why not spend a thoughtful hour a day with Jesus. We are reading Desire of Ages daily. Join us. Desire of Ages

Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Friday         January 21

Further Thought: Hebrews 2:13 contains the words of Jesus to His Father talking about His brethren: “Here am I and the children whom God has given Me” (Heb. 2:13, NKJV). Patrick Gray suggests that Jesus is described here as the guardian of His brothers. The Roman system of tutela impuberum determined that at their father’s death, “A tutor, often an older brother, became responsible for the care of minor children and their inheritance until they reached the age of majority, thus heightening the older brother’s natural duty to take care of his younger siblings.” — Godly Fear: The Epistle to the Hebrews and Greco-Roman Critiques of Superstition [Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2003), p. 126. This explains why Hebrews refers to us both as the siblings of Jesus, as well as His children. As our older brother Jesus is our tutor, our guardian, and protector.

“Christ came to the earth, taking humanity and standing as man’s representative, to show in the controversy with Satan that man, as God created him, connected with the Father and the Son, could obey every divine requirement.” — Ellen G. White, Selected Messages, book 1, p. 253.

And not only as God created him, but also as God re-creates all who will allow Him to do so. There is therefore no excuse for sin even though we live in sinful flesh that is evil by nature. Reconciled to God we become partakers of His divine nature and can resist all sin. God has promised  to give us a hatred of sin and will not allow us to be tempted beyond what we can bear as long as we remain fully surrendered to Him. It is the heart that God wants. He wants all of it.


“In His life and lessons, Christ has given a perfect exemplification of the unselfish ministry which has its origin in God. God does not live for Himself. By creating the world, and by upholding all things, He is constantly ministering for others. ‘He maketh His sun to rise on the evil and on the good, and sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust.’ Matt. 5:45. This ideal of ministry God has committed to His Son. Jesus was given to stand at the head of humanity, that by His example He might teach what it means to minister.” — Ellen G. White, The Desire of Ages, p. 649.

Amen!! The Hebrew Sanctuary and its services reveal how much God loves us and that in order to minister to others we need to wash our hands and feet. What does this washing symbolize?

Discussion Questions:

    Hebrews tells us that Jesus became our brother in order to save us. Think about what that means in terms of what God did in order to save us. Why, then, would turning our back on this amazing reality be such a tragic mistake?

Where shall we begin? Let's begin with the selfish unconverted. There is going to be a price to pay for every sin every committed. The fire will not go out until justice is satisfied. This is the second death. And, for some they will first go through the plagues when probation closes. It would be good to not let the sinner be ignorant of what is coming if he turns his back on the love of God. And for those unconverted and converted not only will there be justice, there will also be the loss of eternal life in a world without sin if the heart is not fully given to God. Who would argue that it would not be a tragic mistake. But, there is more. What of the loved ones of these who reject God's grace? Their influence will cost the loved ones to be lost also....in many cases. And, all of this causes God much sorrow. It is a strange act when judgment is rendered to the wicked.


    Why is it important for us that Jesus was not born “sold under sin” as we are (Rom. 7:14)? Think about Moses, and why it was important for the Israelites that He was not a slave as they were. How does the story of Moses, in a small way, help us understand what Jesus has done for us?

Because of the suffering and death of Jesus, we can be forgiven and transformed to we can live eternally in a world without sin. When we look at the life of Moses, we see a 80 years of obedience and suffering.And, at the end of life, he sinned a great sin. But, Christ raised him from the grave and he is now in heaven. Even if we sin, we still have a Mediator who if we have not hardened the heart past the point of no return will forgive our sins if we truly repent.


    Dwell more on the role of suffering in our lives. Why must we never think that suffering, in and of itself, is good, even if sometimes some good can come out of it?

Jesus had to suffer not only to pay the price for our sins, but for His own ability to save us. He had to become more obedient in order to be able to carry the sins of the world. So it is with us. Is it good that we suffer when we abide in Jesus. Would God bring something upon us if it were not for our good? No. But, He does measure a trial for us each day. For out good. Are we to glory in our tribulation? Why would we glory in suffering? And the most weighty trust and the highest honor God can bestow upon us is to become partakers in the sufferings of Christ. Will the lessons cover this important truth? If not, then it will be up to us to learn what it means to partake of our Savior's sufferings, and why we glory in our sufferings. What means the Scripture that Jesus learned obedience through the things He suffered?

When we understand the purpose of His suffering in order to be obedient it will help us appreciate the tribulations God allows to come to us. If one wants the answers, we will continue this discussion as long as there is interest in this important topic. The light God has given is not just for us, but to help others understand why God allows "good" people to suffer.
“Unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on Him, but also to suffer for His sake.” Philippians 1:29. And of all the gifts that Heaven can bestow upon men, fellowship with Christ in His sufferings is the most weighty trust and the highest honor. { DA 224.5}
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Sabbath Afternoon – Jesus, Our Faithful Brother

“Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;” Hebrews 2:14

Paul’s letter to the Hebrews is a real blessing for each of us. We see Christ lifted up before us as He who upholds the all things by the power of His Word being a partaker of our flesh yes “part of the same.” There is no other religion in the world that stands on par with the Bible. How can it be that the power source of all heaven can be born in a manger and then be subjected to the hatred and scorn from His own creatures.

Christ became us and then suffered for us and then has all power in heaven and earth to redeem us. The pagans with their multitude of gods all have the same sinful characters as those who invented them. The Bible portrays a God of supreme love total unselfishness  striving to rescue the perishing by every means possible. The great I AM willingly came to us and was born in manger and became our elder brother our nearest of kin. All the stops are out when God seeks to save.

Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Sunday – The Brother as a Redeemer

Leviticus 25:25 “If thy brother be waxen poor, and hath sold away some of his possession, and if any of his kin come to redeem it, then shall he redeem that which his brother sold.”

 “And if a sojourner or stranger wax rich by thee, and thy brother that dwelleth by him wax poor, and sell himself unto the stranger or sojourner by thee, or to the stock of the stranger's family: After that he is sold he may be redeemed again; one of his brethren may redeem him: Either his uncle, or his uncle's son, may redeem him, or any that is nigh of kin unto him of his family may redeem him; or if he be able, he may redeem himself. Leviticus 25:47-59

There was another way to get your property back and to be set free again. You can wait until the year of the Jubilee. The jubilee came every 50 years but there is no record that it was ever kept.

Webster defines “redemption” as “Repurchase of captured goods or prisoners; the act of procuring the deliverance of persons or things from the possession and power of captors by the payment of an equivalent; ransom; release; as the redemption of prisoners taken in war; the redemption of a ship and cargo.”

The second definition “Deliverance from bondage, distress, or from liability to any evil or forfeiture, either by money, labor or other means.”

During the time of Christ, the Jewish leaders and people wanted to be delivered from bondage of Rome. They wanted Christ to come as king and put down all their enemies and set some of them in positions as leaders. What a mess that would have been to replace one selfish rule for anther. Christ wanted to deliver the people from the most dangerous enemy which is “self.” That idea was not very popular and still is not.

I remember some years back a cartoon where a small boy was running around with a pan on his head pretending to be a solider holding a stick for a rifle. He was darting from tree to tree and popping his head up behind the rocks and shrubs looking for the enemy. In the final caption he says “I found the enemy and the enemy is me.” We can spend allot of time talking about the out there and the condition of the world but we need to take a deep look inside our own hearts and ask Christ to redeem us every day.

Isaiah 43:1 “But now thus saith the LORD that created thee, O Jacob, and he that formed thee, O Israel, Fear not: for I have redeemed thee, I have called thee by thy name; thou art mine.”
[Isaiah 43:4 “Since thou wast precious in my sight, thou hast been honourable, and I have loved thee: therefore will I give men for thee, and people for thy life.”
 
“To me, you are very dear, and I love you. That's why I gave up nations and people to rescue you.” Contemporary English Bible

God spares no words about how He feels about each of us. All heaven is actively involved in working in our behalf. We don’t fully understand the incarnation and what it cost Christ in order to save each of us. 
Many have joined the church not because they needed to be redeemed but because of the logic of the truth. Those who truly see themselves as sinners totally undone will understand their need of Christ’ and the salvation He offers.

What is redemption and why do you personally need it?

Make a list of reasons you need to be redeemed and why Christ needed to come to our earth in human flesh?
Why did Christ need to become our brother in the flesh?

Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Monday – Not Ashamed to Call Them Brothers

God’s love is displayed in so many ways in order to soften and subdue our hearts so that we will serve Him with a fullness of purpose. The King of heaven the almighty God says we are family. “Jesus and the people he makes holy all belong to the same family. That is why he isn't ashamed to call them his brothers and sisters.” Hebrews 2:11 Contemporary English Version

The KJV says “For both he that sanctifieth and they who are sanctified are all of one: for which cause he is not ashamed to call them brethren,”

Paul is expressing a couple of points the first is the effect of redemption in a person’s life is shown in making us holy. “And every man that hath this hope in him purifieth himself, even as he is pure. 1 John 3:3 Those who are eating the flesh and drinking the blood of the Son of man will be growing in grace becoming more like Him whom they love.

The other truth that is precious to us is that Christ is “not ashamed to call them brethren.” This truth is shared by the John speaking of Christ.  “And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.” John 1:14

Jesus is bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh he is our nearest of kin. When the Bible speaks of Him it calls him the Son of man. “For the Son of man is come to save that which was lost.” Matthew 18:11
 
When Jesus returns to this earth to gather His people he is referred to as the “Son of Man.” “And then shall they see the Son of man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. Luke 21:27

 “For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham. Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things pertaining to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.” Hebrews 2:16, 17 

“But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.” Philippians 2:7, 8

“Christ did not make-believe take human nature; He did verily take it. He did in reality possess human nature. "As the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same." He was the son of Mary; He was of the seed of David according to human descent. He is declared to be a man, even the Man Christ Jesus. "This man," writes Paul, "was counted worthy of more glory than Moses, inasmuch as he who hath builded the house hath more honor than the house." Lift Him Up Chapter 3

What did Christ give up when he took upon Him our humanity?
Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2022, 08:24:30 PM »
Tuesday – Flesh and Blood Like Us

As many of us know this is a hot topic which has been argued down through the centuries as to what kind of nature Christ had. Two men while at church started to argue about the nature of Christ while in the church foyer this discussion continued out on the church steps and ended up in them fighting. Yes, blow for blow wrestling on the ground and the police came and broke up the fight. This goes to demonstrate having the a right or wrong view is not enough. One can believe like an angel and act like the devil. It is what we live that will back up what we believe about Christ. 

There is much we don’t understand about Christ’s nature as we will study the incarnation through eternity. It simple terms someone who is wanting to overcome will see Christ as a man of sorrows tempted in all points even as we are. Christ overcame by putting His trust in the Word of God so we can overcome the same way. But only those who see their need will cling to God’s Word.

The nature of Christ being our flesh and blood and bone of our bone and flesh of our flesh is not topic to be argued as much as experienced. Those who are partakers of the divine nature have found a fountain the water of life that makes them more than overcomers. Christ becoming us should fill our hearts with love and praise. How are we to understand the sacrifice God made in our behalf in become us he risked all.
“In taking upon Himself man's nature in its fallen condition, Christ did not in the least participate in its sin. He was subject to the infirmities and weaknesses by which man is encompassed. . . . He was touched with the feeling of our infirmities, and was in all points tempted like as we are. And yet He "knew no sin." He was the lamb "without blemish and without spot." Could Satan in the least particular have tempted Christ to sin, he would have bruised the Saviour's head. As it was, he could only touch His heel. Had the head of Christ been touched, the hope of the human race would have perished. Divine wrath would have come upon Christ as it came upon Adam. Christ and the church would have been without hope.” The Faith I Live By chapter two

Yes, Christ could have failed. Have you ever thought about the risk Christ took in order to save you? How are you responding to His goodness and love? Thank, God Christ was victorious and now sits at the right hand of God as our elder brother and the King of heaven.

Jesus was also different than us in some ways. “Be careful, exceedingly careful as to how you dwell upon the human nature of Christ. Do not set Him before the people as a man with the propensities of sin. He is the second Adam. The first Adam was created a pure, sinless being, without a taint of sin upon him; he was in the image of God. He could fall, and he did fall through transgressing. Because of sin his posterity was born with inherent propensities of disobedience. But Jesus Christ was the only begotten Son of God. He took upon Himself human nature, and was tempted in all points as human nature is tempted. He could have sinned; He could have fallen, but not for one moment was there in Him an evil propensity. He was assailed with temptations in the wilderness, as Adam was assailed with temptations in Eden.” Vol. 5 Bible Commentary page 1128
Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2022, 08:29:17 PM »
Wednesday – Perfected Through Sufferings

“For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings.” Hebrews 2:10

Last week in class one person asked “What would have happened if the Jewish nation would have excepted Christ?” I don’t like to speculate but it certainly would have been a much different story than what we read in the Bible today.

Satan did all that he could do to make life hard for Christ. He made his path difficult and all the evil angels of darkness were working against him. None of us will ever face the temptations to the intensity which Christ endured. Those who should have embraced Christ plotted his death and turned the people against Him. Even when Christ was weighted down with the sins of the world His own disciples sleep when He needed their prayers and loving support.

How many of us have every felt alone or have trials at home and abroad? How many of us have suffered for doing the right? We can come to Christ by faith knowing that he is a sympathizing Saviour who know all about our heartache and pain. We can be comforted to know that He has suffered in our behalf and will not forsake us. We have a Friend in the court above who understands our sorrows and our afflictions.
 
“Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered; And being made perfect, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him;” Hebrews 5:8, 9

“Jesus Christ has given Himself as a complete offering in behalf of every fallen son and daughter of Adam. O what humiliation He bore! How He descended, step after step, lower and lower in the path of humiliation, yet He never degraded His soul with one foul blot of sin! All this He suffered, that He might lift you up, cleanse, refine, and ennoble you, and place you as a joint heir with Himself upon His throne. How shall you make your calling and election sure? What is the way of salvation? Christ says, "I am the way, the truth, and the life." However sinful, however guilty you may be, you are called, you are chosen. "Draw nigh to God, and He will draw nigh to you." Not one will be forced against his will to come to Jesus Christ. The Majesty of heaven, the only-begotten Son of the true and living God, opened the way for you to come to Him, by giving His life as a sacrifice on Calvary's cross.” Fundamentals of Christian Education p. 251, 252

Christ the unselfish Saviour bore the pain he suffered in our behalf so he could be a sympathizing friend.
 
Today when some are tested, they are sifted and become discourage and lay down their armor and give up the good fight of faith. But there are others who gladly suffer for Christ.  Many laid down their lives gladly for the cause of His truth and for the uplifting of His glory.

“The Christian life is a life of warfare, of continual conflict. It is a battle and a march. But every act of obedience to Christ, every act of self-denial for His sake, every trial well endured, every victory gained over temptation, is a step in the march to the glory of final victory.” Manuscript 65, 1894 (Review and Herald, Feb. 5, 1895)

Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2022, 07:08:48 AM »
Thursday – The Brother as a Model

Years ago, when I was reading everything book I could on the nature of Christ and searching the pages of the Spirit of Prophecy on this topic the thought came to me make it simple. Sometimes you can get so caught up in a topic that one can overlook the simplicity of it all.  The one text that was brought to my mind is found in 1 Peter 2:21, 22
 
“For even hereunto were ye called: because Christ also suffered for us, leaving us an example, that ye should follow his steps: Who did no sin, neither was guile found in his mouth:”

 When all is said and done what is clear is Christ was are example. The scripture goes on to say that Christ was our example in suffering abut also in that he did no sin. Why he never spoke anything but the truth. This is a very high calling indeed for those us who are undone and who have sinned for many years of our lives. Christ came to set the captives free for those who want it.

This scripture sums up the lesson for this week in that Christ suffered not for himself but for us. He was bruised and afflicted, beaten and hung on the cross “for us.” Then it simply says we “are to follow in his steps.” This is just to clear that Christ is our “Brother as a Model” said you can have victory just as I did.

Christ being our example is something that we can’t get confused about. “True Christians will have an experience like that of Christ in the wilderness of temptation, especially those who engage in rescuing souls from the snares of Satan. They will meet the assaults of the enemy of all righteousness; and as Christ overcame, so may they overcome through His grace. Christians should not feel that they are abandoned of God because they are subjected to sore temptations. If they remain unshaken by the temptations, Satan will leave them, and angels will minister to them as they did to Jesus.” Christ Triumphant Chapter 7

This is a wonderful promise indeed and very clear that we can have overcoming power by putting our trust in the Word of God.

“The Saviour overcame the wily foe, showing us how we may overcome. He has left us His example, to repel Satan with Scripture. He might have had recourse to His own divine power and used His own words, but His example would not then have been as useful to us. Christ used only Scripture. How important that the Word of God be thoroughly studied and followed, that in case of emergency we may be “thoroughly furnished unto all good works” and especially fortified to meet the wily foe.” Letter 1a, 1872.

Christ overcame and for what reason “He had left us His example.” And why “to repel Satan with Scripture” now this is very simple. If we get lost in, what kind of nature Christ had we can always come back to the basics. We can overcome just as Christ our Brother in the flesh overcame.

And what does this scripture mean? “Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust.” 2 Peter 1:4

Make a list and explain how you are a partaker of the divine nature? Is there not a promise oh exceeding great and precious promises that we can have victor over our nasty natures. Victory for the weak is the teaching of the Word of God. We can be “partakers of the divine nature” but how and what does it all mean? I would like to hear your thoughts and how this work in your life? 

Those who don’t want to let go of sin will find excuse after excuse and no amount of arguing with them will be of any avail. John the Baptist said the ax needs to be laid at the root of the tree. Self needs to be crucified be put to death so that Christ can live in us. A profession of the truth is worthless. Those who hunger and thirst after righteousness will strive with ever fiber of their being to be rid of sin. There love for Christ will become a passion and the day star will arise in their hearts.

Christ came to this world to be our example our “Brother as a Model.”


Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2022, 08:17:54 AM »
Amen Brother Al!  It is the love of God for us while we were yet sinners that transforms all who will learn of Him and then surrender the whole heart. He is our example in all things. It is His sufferings for us that causes us to fall on our face in true repentance. Many wonder why it is that they continue to sin. It is because we can only be faithful when filled with the Holy Spirit. That can only happen when we give Him all that we have and all we are. Than happens when we allow His grace into the heart. And....we do not get grace for tomorrow, we must come to the foot of cross day after day to receive new stores of grace that the heart will continually be surrendered to Him who gave all that we might live.

The most weighty trust and the highest honor God can give to us is to partake in the sufferings of Jesus. When we understand that this glorifies our Savior, then we shall desire to carry the cross that truly belongs to us and not Him.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Bill Wennell

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 339
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2022, 12:50:01 PM »
Thoughts on the current lesson:

Sabbath Afternoon:

The quotation from Hebrews that Jesus was made a little lower than the “angels” (aggelos – Strong’s #G32, meaning a “messenger”) is from the Septuagint (the Septuagint, sometimes abbreviated as LXX, was the Hebrew Old Testament translated into Greek when they were the world's ruling power. It differs significantly from the Hebrew Old Testament and explains why many New Testament quotations from the Old Testament do not use the same wording as they are manly from the Septuagint) and not a translation from the Hebrew Old Testament even though it is a quote from Psalms 8:5 (which, although it reads the same in the King James Bible, reads “angels” but in the Hebrew Old Testament of Psalms 8:5 the word “angels” is the Hebrew word “Elohim” (Strong’s #H430) commonly translated as “God” in the Old Testament but was also translated to the English word “angel” due to the New Testament usage. However, there is indication that the original sense was “a little lower than God”.

Sunday:

The lesson is a little mistaken as a Hebrew slave to another Hebrew was to serve either unto the seventh year (Exodus 21:1-2) or unto the Jubilee Year, as mentioned in these texts. There was no reason to suppose, as the lesson does here, that every Hebrew slave could only regain his freedom every 50 years. The lesson does rightly use these texts to describe the relationship of the slave to his Redeemer (here exemplified by Christ in the grandest sense or as a type of Christ).

Once again, the lesson gets confused about what Adam’s sin did and did not do. The belief that we are condemned by Adam’s sin (even though they state, “our transgression”, which would be true, they lump this in with the results of Adam’s sin thereby making the death penalty part of his actions, which is not true), is also called “Original Sin” (since it occurred at the “origin” of man). Although many pastors and leaders have adopted this belief into Adventism it is not an Adventist belief and is to be objected to. In Ezekiel 18, God states that ancient Israel held a similar teaching, that is, that they charged God falsely by saying, “The fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children's teeth are set on edge”. (Ezekiel 18:2) Thus, they were being punished for something their ancestral fathers did. God vehemently denied this charge by stating, “As I live, saith the Lord GOD, ye shall not have occasion any more to use this proverb in Israel”. (Ezekiel 18:3) Everyone who dies the first death is bearing out a consequence of Adam’s Sin – this is true; but only those who sin, as Adam did (and we all will sin unless aided by the power of Christ) will receive of the second death. Though this may seem a technicality it is an important distinction because God has condemned the belief in Original Sin Himself. Ellen White also denies this belief in the following statement:
“Visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate Me.” It is inevitable that children should suffer from the consequences of parental wrongdoing, but they are not punished for the parents’ guilt, except as they participate in their sins. It is usually the case, however, that children walk in the steps of their parents. By inheritance and example the sons become partakers of the father’s sin. Wrong tendencies, perverted appetites, and debased morals, as well as physical disease and degeneracy, are transmitted as a legacy from father to son, to the third and fourth generation. This fearful truth should have a solemn power to restrain men from following a course of sin. {Patriarchs & Prophets, page 306.3}

Tuesday:

IMPORTANT – Does everyone notice the problem of Jesus being like us “in all things” yet not having our tendencies? How He could be tempted yet not from within? This is where the lesson veers of an established “thus saith the Lord” for a “this is how we need to understand these verses”. In the second paragraph, the author separates (First…) from (Second…) when they say the same thing! Jesus did not commit sin (action or thought, commission or omission) and therefore was “holy, innocent, unstained, separate from sinner”. Notice, that is “therefore” and not First and Second – they say the same thing! Did Jesus share our nature? Yes or No. Was He in all things tempted as we are? Yes or No. I guess that depends on whether you are asking the Bible or a pastor (teacher, leader, etc.). The Bible answers are Yes! The lesson says Yes to being like us but No to actually being like us. What’s wrong? We have the Bible answers, let’s look at the Spirit of Prophecy.

Trials and temptations may come; but the child of God, whether minister or layman, knows that Jesus is his helper. Jesus is stronger than the strong man armed, and will rescue from the power of Satan every soul that relies wholly upon him. Although we may be weak and helpless in ourselves, yet all the forces of heaven are at the command of the believing child of God, and the hosts of hell cannot make him depart from the right course if he clings to God by living faith. Temptation is no sin; the sin is in yielding to temptation. “Count it all joy,” says the apostle James, “when ye fall into divers temptations, knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing.” God permits us to be placed under circumstances that will test us, to increase our love and to perfect our trust in him. Through self-denial and suffering with Christ, we grow in grace and in the knowledge of the truth. Trials will come, but they are an evidence that we are children of God. Paul passed through great trials, but he did not despair as though his Father in heaven were dead. He rejoiced in tribulation; for he desired, through participation in the sufferings of Christ, to be conformed to his image. Let this hero of faith speak for himself. He says, “I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecution, in distresses for Christ’s sake.” {Review & Herald May 20, 1884, par. 8}

So, Jesus could be tempted, as long as He did not give in to temptation. But was He tempted with the same things we are tempted with?

In Christ were united the human and the divine. His mission was to reconcile God and man, to unite the finite with the infinite. This was the only way in which fallen men could be exalted through the merits of the blood of Christ to be partakers of the divine nature. Taking human nature fitted Christ to understand man’s trials and sorrows, and all the temptations wherewith he is beset. Angels who were unacquainted with sin could not sympathize with man in his peculiar trials. Christ condescended to take man’s nature and was tempted in all points like as we, that He might know how to succor all who should be tempted. {Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 2, page 201.1} 1871

Christ must bear the sins of the world. As they were now laid upon Him, they seemed more than He could endure. The guilt of sin was so terrible, He was tempted to fear that God could no longer love Him. {Story of Jesus, page 102.2} 1900

Even doubts assailed the dying Son of God. He could not see through the portals of the tomb. Bright hope did not present to Him His coming forth from the tomb a conqueror and His Father’s acceptance of His sacrifice. The sin of the world, with all its terribleness, was felt to the utmost by the Son of God. The displeasure of the Father for sin, and its penalty, which is death, were all that He could realize through this amazing darkness. He was tempted to fear that sin was so offensive in the sight of His Father that He could not be reconciled to His Son. The fierce temptation that His own Father had forever left Him caused that piercing cry from the cross: “My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?” {Testimonies for the Church, Vol. 2, page 209.3}

Sunday afternoon I spoke in the same hall on the subject of temperance to a good congregation, who listened with the deepest interest. I had freedom and power in presenting Jesus, who took upon himself the infirmities and bore the griefs and sorrows of humanity, and conquered in our behalf. He was made like unto his brethren, with the same susceptibilities, mental and physical. He was tempted in all points like as we are, yet without sin; and he knows how to succor those who are tempted. Are you harassed and perplexed? So was Jesus. Do you feel the need of encouragement? So did Jesus. As Satan tempts you, so he tempted the Majesty of heaven. Jesus, as your representative and substitute, did not yield on the field of conflict; and in his strength you may resist and conquer. Every fallen son and daughter of Adam may rejoice that they are prisoners of hope, and that Satan can be vanquished. {Review & Herald February 10, 1885 par. 7}

Satan had pointed to Adam’s sin as proof that God’s law was unjust, and could not be obeyed. In our humanity, Christ was to redeem Adam’s failure. But when Adam was assailed by the tempter, none of the effects of sin were upon him. He stood in the strength of perfect manhood, possessing the full vigor of mind and body. He was surrounded with the glories of Eden, and was in daily communion with heavenly beings. It was not thus with Jesus when He entered the wilderness to cope with Satan. (What was “not thus” with Jesus? That the effects of sin were, therefore, upon Him? It must be as she goes on to say…) For four thousand years the race had been decreasing in physical strength, in mental power, and in moral worth; and Christ took upon Him the infirmities of degenerate humanity. Only thus could He rescue man from the lowest depths of his degradation.
Many claim that it was impossible for Christ to be overcome by temptation. Then He could not have been placed in Adam’s position; He could not have gained the victory that Adam failed to gain. If we have in any sense a more trying conflict than had Christ, then He would not be able to succor us. But our Saviour took humanity, with all its liabilities. He took the nature of man, with the possibility of yielding to temptation. We have nothing to bear which He has not endured. {Desire of Ages, page 117}

The human family have all the help that Christ had in their conflicts with Satan. They need not be overcome. They may be more than conquerors through Him who has loved them and given His life for them. “Ye are bought with a price” ( 1 Corinthians 6:20). And what a price! The Son of God in His humanity wrestled with the very same fierce, apparently overwhelming temptations that assail men—temptations to indulgence of appetite, to presumptuous venturing where God has not led them, and to the worship of the God of this world, to sacrifice an eternity of bliss for the fascinating pleasures of this life. Everyone will be tempted, but the Word declares that we shall not be tempted above our ability to bear. We may resist and defeat the wily foe. {Selected Messages, Vol. 1, page 95.3}

I think it is very easy to understand what the Bible is trying to tell us.

-Bill Wennell
Bill Wennell<BR>Medical-missionary Brazil<BR>BiblicalTruths2000@Juno.com

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #15 on: January 21, 2022, 07:55:29 PM »

 “Count it all joy,” says the apostle James, “when ye fall into divers temptations, knowing this, that the trying of your faith worketh patience. But let patience have her perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing.” God permits us to be placed under circumstances that will test us, to increase our love and to perfect our trust in him. Through self-denial and suffering with Christ, we grow in grace and in the knowledge of the truth. Trials will come, but they are an evidence that we are children of God. Paul passed through great trials, but he did not despair as though his Father in heaven were dead. He rejoiced in tribulation; for he desired, through participation in the sufferings of Christ, to be conformed to his image. Let this hero of faith speak for himself. He says, “I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in necessities, in persecution, in distresses for Christ’s sake.” {Review & Herald May 20, 1884, par. 8}

Amen Brother Bill. This addresses a question asked in Friday's lesson about suffering.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Al

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 369
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2022, 06:42:40 AM »
Thoughts on the current lesson:

Sabbath Afternoon:

The quotation from Hebrews that Jesus was made a little lower than the “angels” (aggelos – Strong’s #G32, meaning a “messenger”) is from the Septuagint (the Septuagint, sometimes abbreviated as LXX, was the Hebrew Old Testament translated into Greek when they were the world's ruling power. It differs significantly from the Hebrew Old Testament and explains why many New Testament quotations from the Old Testament do not use the same wording as they are manly from the Septuagint) and not a translation from the Hebrew Old Testament even though it is a quote from Psalms 8:5 (which, although it reads the same in the King James Bible, reads “angels” but in the Hebrew Old Testament of Psalms 8:5 the word “angels” is the Hebrew word “Elohim” (Strong’s #H430) commonly translated as “God” in the Old Testament but was also translated to the English word “angel” due to the New Testament usage. However, there is indication that the original sense was “a little lower than God”.

Bill, I can see how you came to your conclusion on the use of the word “angel” but we need to be careful not to make Christ “a little lower than God.” Paul has just made the point that Christ came in the fullness of God the exact copy “Who being the brightness of his glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high;” Hebrews 1:3

“Was the human nature of the Son of Mary changed into the divine nature of the Son of God? No; the two natures were mysteriously blended in one person--the man Christ Jesus. In Him dwelt all the fullness of the Godhead bodily. When Christ was crucified, it was His human nature that died. Deity did not sink and die; that would have been impossible. Christ, the sinless One, will save every son and daughter of Adam who accepts the salvation proffered them, consenting to become the children of God. The Saviour has purchased the fallen race with His own blood.” Lift Him Up p. 76.

The Pen of Inspiration shows that Paul was speaking of angels as the heavenly host. It can also be seen in the larger context of Hebrews.

 “The angels prostrated themselves at the feet of their Commander and offered to become a sacrifice for lost humans. But an angel’s life could not pay the debt; only He who created them had power to redeem them. Yet the angels were to have a part to act in the plan of redemption. Christ was to be made “a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death.” As He should take human nature upon Him, His strength would not be equal to theirs, and they were to minister to Him, to strengthen and soothe Him under His sufferings. They were also to be ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who should be heirs of salvation. They would guard the subjects of grace from the power of evil angels and from the darkness constantly thrown around them by Satan.” Patriarchs and Prophets p. 64, 65

Jesus looked upon the distressed and heart burdened, those whose hopes were blighted, and who with earthly joys were seeking to quiet the longing of the soul, and He invited all to find rest in Him.  {DA 328.3}

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 42708
  • Grace, more than a word, it is transforming power
    • The Remnant Online
Re: SDA Sabbath School Lesson 4--1st Quarter 2022--Jesus, Our Faithful Brother
« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2022, 07:07:12 AM »
Jesus came in both ways. How can that be? He had a divine nature and a fallen nature. As I pointed out, it ought not be a surprise to all who believe we can keep the commandments of God, all of them all of the time, as long as we abide in Christ so that we also will have two natures. We become a partaker of God's divine nature as long as the third person of the godhead dwells in the heart. So, in His human nature He was a little lower than the angels, but in His divine nature, He was still God. His human nature died, but divinity cannot die. Many in the church object, but that does not undo the truth. "Deity did not sink and die; that would have been impossible."

Thank you both for being faithful Bible students. Have a blessed Sabbath.

Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.