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JimB

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The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« on: April 01, 2016, 06:34:35 PM »
Chap. 76 - Judas


Listen to  Judas


 




     The history of Judas presents the sad ending of a life that might have been honored of God. Had Judas died before his last journey to Jerusalem he would have been regarded as a man worthy of a place among the twelve, and one who would be greatly missed. The abhorrence which has followed him through the centuries would not have existed but for the attributes revealed at the close of his history. But it was for a purpose that his character was laid open to the world. It was to be a warning to all who, like him, should betray sacred trusts. 
     A little before the Passover, Judas had renewed his contract with the priests to deliver Jesus into their hands. Then it was arranged that the Saviour should be taken at one of His resorts for meditation and prayer. Since the feast at the house of Simon, Judas had had opportunity to reflect upon the deed which he had covenanted to perform, but his purpose was unchanged. For thirty pieces of silver--the price of a slave--he sold the Lord of glory to ignominy and death.   
     Judas had naturally a strong love for money; but he had not always been corrupt enough to do such a deed as this. He had fostered the evil spirit of avarice until it had become the ruling motive of his life. The love of mammon overbalanced his love for Christ. Through becoming the slave of one vice he gave himself to Satan, to be driven to any lengths in sin. 
     Judas had joined the disciples when multitudes were following Christ. The Saviour's teaching moved their hearts as they hung entranced upon His words, spoken in the synagogue, by the seaside, upon the mount. Judas saw the sick, the lame, the blind, flock to Jesus from the towns and cities. He saw the dying laid at His feet. He witnessed the Saviour's mighty works in healing the sick, casting out devils, and raising the dead. He felt in his own person the evidence of Christ's power. He recognized the teaching of Christ as superior to all that he had ever heard. He loved the Great Teacher, and desired to be with Him. He felt a desire to be changed in character and life, and he hoped to experience this through connecting himself with Jesus. The Saviour did not repulse Judas. He gave him a place among the twelve. He trusted him to do the work of an evangelist. He endowed him with power to heal the sick and to cast out devils. But Judas did not come to the point of surrendering himself fully to Christ. He did not give up his worldly ambition or his love of money. While he accepted the position of a minister of Christ, he did not bring himself under the divine molding. He felt that he could retain his own judgment and opinions, and he cultivated a disposition to criticize and accuse. 
     Judas was highly regarded by the disciples, and had great influence over them. He himself had a high opinion of his own qualifications, and looked upon his brethren as greatly inferior to him in judgment and ability. They did not see their opportunities, he thought, and take advantage of circumstances. The church would never prosper with such shortsighted men as leaders. Peter was impetuous; he would move without consideration. John, who was treasuring up the truths that fell from Christ's lips, was looked upon by Judas as a poor financier. Matthew, whose training had taught him accuracy in all things, was very particular in regard to honesty, and he was ever contemplating the words of Christ, and became so absorbed in them that, as Judas thought, he could not be trusted to do sharp, far-seeing business. Thus Judas summed up all the disciples, and flattered himself that the church would often be brought into perplexity and embarrassment if it were not for his ability as a manager. Judas regarded himself as the capable one, who could not be overreached. In his own estimation he was an honor to the cause, and as such he always represented himself. 
     Judas was blinded to his own weakness of character, and Christ placed him where he would have an opportunity to see and correct this. As treasurer for the disciples, he was called upon to provide for the needs of the little company, and to relieve the necessities of the poor. When in the Passover chamber Jesus said to him, "That thou doest, do quickly" (John 13:27), the disciples thought He had bidden him buy what was needed for the feast, or give something to the poor. In ministering to others, Judas might have developed an unselfish spirit. But while listening daily to the lessons of Christ and witnessing His unselfish life, Judas indulged his covetous disposition. The small sums that came into his hands were a continual temptation. Often when he did a little service for Christ, or devoted time to religious purposes, he paid himself out of this meager fund. In his own eyes these pretexts served to excuse his action; but in God's sight he was a thief.
     Christ's oft-repeated statement that His kingdom was not of this world offended Judas. He had marked out a line upon which he expected Christ to work. He had planned that John the Baptist should be delivered from prison. But lo, John was left to be beheaded. And Jesus, instead of asserting His royal right and avenging the death of John, retired with His disciples into a country place. Judas wanted more aggressive warfare. He thought that if Jesus would not prevent the disciples from carrying out their schemes, the work would be more successful. He marked the increasing enmity of the Jewish leaders, and saw their challenge unheeded when they demanded from Christ a sign from heaven. His heart was open to unbelief, and the enemy supplied thoughts of questioning and rebellion. Why did Jesus dwell so much upon that which was discouraging? Why did He predict trial and persecution for Himself and for His disciples? The prospect of having a high place in the new kingdom had led Judas to espouse the cause of Christ. Were his hopes to be disappointed? Judas had not decided that Jesus was not the Son of God; but he was questioning, and seeking to find some explanation of His mighty works. 
     Notwithstanding the Saviour's own teaching, Judas was continually advancing the idea that Christ would reign as king in Jerusalem. At the feeding of the five thousand he tried to bring this about. On this occasion Judas assisted in distributing the food to the hungry multitude. He had an opportunity to see the benefit which it was in his power to impart to others. He felt the satisfaction that always comes in service to God. He helped to bring the sick and suffering from among the multitude to Christ. He saw what relief, what joy and gladness, come to human hearts through the healing power of the Restorer. He might have comprehended the methods of Christ. But he was blinded by his own selfish desires. Judas was first to take advantage of the enthusiasm excited by the miracle of the loaves. It was he who set on foot the project to take Christ by force and make Him king. His hopes were high. His disappointment was bitter. 
     Christ's discourse in the synagogue concerning the bread of life was the turning point in the history of Judas. He heard the words, "Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, ye have no life in you." John 6:53. He saw that Christ was offering spiritual rather than worldly good. He regarded himself as farsighted, and thought he could see that Jesus would have no honor, and that He could bestow no high position upon His followers. He determined not to unite himself so closely to Christ but that he could draw away. He would watch. And he did watch.
     From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.
     When Jesus presented to the rich young ruler the condition of discipleship, Judas was displeased. He thought that a mistake had been made. If such men as this ruler could be connected with the believers, they would help sustain Christ's cause. If Judas were only received as a counselor, he thought, he could suggest many plans for the advantage of the little church. His principles and methods would differ somewhat from Christ's, but in these things he thought himself wiser than Christ.   
     In all that Christ said to His disciples, there was something with which, in heart, Judas disagreed. Under his influence the leaven of disaffection was fast doing its work. The disciples did not see the real agency in all this; but Jesus saw that Satan was communicating his attributes to Judas, and thus opening up a channel through which to influence the other disciples. This, a year before the betrayal, Christ declared. "Have not I chosen you twelve," He said, "and one of you is a devil?" John 6:70. 
     Yet Judas made no open opposition, nor seemed to question the Saviour's lessons. He made no outward murmur until the time of the feast in Simon's house. When Mary anointed the Saviour's feet, Judas manifested his covetous disposition. At the reproof from Jesus his very spirit seemed turned to gall. Wounded pride and desire for revenge broke down the barriers, and the greed so long indulged held him in control. This will be the experience of everyone who persists in tampering with sin. The elements of depravity that are not resisted and overcome, respond to Satan's temptation, and the soul is led captive at his will. 
     But Judas was not yet wholly hardened. Even after he had twice pledged himself to betray the Saviour, there was opportunity for repentance. At the Passover supper Jesus proved His divinity by revealing the traitor's purpose. He tenderly included Judas in the ministry to the disciples. But the last appeal of love was unheeded. Then the case of Judas was decided, and the feet that Jesus had washed went forth to the betrayer's work. 
     Judas reasoned that if Jesus was to be crucified, the event must come to pass. His own act in betraying the Saviour would not change the result. If Jesus was not to die, it would only force Him to deliver Himself. At all events, Judas would gain something by his treachery. He counted that he had made a sharp bargain in betraying his Lord. 
     Judas did not, however, believe that Christ would permit Himself to be arrested. In betraying Him, it was his purpose to teach Him a lesson. He intended to play a part that would make the Saviour careful thenceforth to treat him with due respect. But Judas knew not that he was giving Christ up to death. How often, as the Saviour taught in parables, the scribes and Pharisees had been carried away with His striking illustrations! How often they had pronounced judgment against themselves! Often when the truth was brought home to their hearts, they had been filled with rage, and had taken up stones to cast at Him; but again and again He had made His escape. Since He had escaped so many snares, thought Judas, He certainly would not now allow Himself to be taken. 
     Judas decided to put the matter to the test. If Jesus really was the Messiah, the people, for whom He had done so much, would rally about Him, and would proclaim Him king. This would forever settle many minds that were now in uncertainty. Judas would have the credit of having placed the king on David's throne. And this act would secure to him the first position, next to Christ, in the new kingdom.   
     The false disciple acted his part in betraying Jesus. In the garden, when he said to the leaders of the mob, "Whomsoever I shall kiss, that same is He: hold Him fast" (Matthew 26:48), he fully believed that Christ would escape out of their hands. Then if they should blame him, he could say, Did I not tell you to hold Him fast? 
     Judas beheld the captors of Christ, acting upon his words, bind Him firmly. In amazement he saw that the Saviour suffered Himself to be led away. Anxiously he followed Him from the garden to the trial before the Jewish rulers. At every movement he looked for Him to surprise His enemies, by appearing before them as the Son of God, and setting at nought all their plots and power. But as hour after hour went by, and Jesus submitted to all the abuse heaped upon Him, a terrible fear came to the traitor that he had sold his Master to His death.   
     As the trial drew to a close, Judas could endure the torture of his guilty conscience no longer. Suddenly a hoarse voice rang through the hall, sending a thrill of terror to all hearts: He is innocent; spare Him, O Caiaphas! 
     The tall form of Judas was now seen pressing through the startled throng. His face was pale and haggard, and great drops of sweat stood on his forehead. Rushing to the throne of judgment, he threw down before the high priest the pieces of silver that had been the price of his Lord's betrayal. Eagerly grasping the robe of Caiaphas, he implored him to release Jesus, declaring that He had done nothing worthy of death. Caiaphas angrily shook him off, but was confused, and knew not what to say. The perfidy of the priests was revealed. It was evident that they had bribed the disciple to betray his Master.
     "I have sinned," again cried Judas, "in that I have betrayed the innocent blood." But the high priest, regaining his self-possession, answered with scorn, "What is that to us? see thou to that." Matthew 27:4. The priests had been willing to make Judas their tool; but they despised his baseness. When he turned to them with confession, they spurned him. 
     Judas now cast himself at the feet of Jesus, acknowledging Him to be the Son of God, and entreating Him to deliver Himself. The Saviour did not reproach His betrayer. He knew that Judas did not repent; his confession was forced from his guilty soul by an awful sense of condemnation and a looking for of judgment, but he felt no deep, heartbreaking grief that he had betrayed the spotless Son of God, and denied the Holy One of Israel. Yet Jesus spoke no word of condemnation. He looked pityingly upon Judas, and said, For this hour came I into the world.
     A murmur of surprise ran through the assembly. With amazement they beheld the forbearance of Christ toward His betrayer. Again there swept over them the conviction that this Man was more than mortal. But if He was the Son of God, they questioned, why did He not free Himself from His bonds and triumph over His accusers?   
     Judas saw that his entreaties were in vain, and he rushed from the hall exclaiming, It is too late! It is too late! He felt that he could not live to see Jesus crucified, and in despair went out and hanged himself.   
     Later that same day, on the road from Pilate's hall to Calvary, there came an interruption to the shouts and jeers of the wicked throng who were leading Jesus to the place of crucifixion. As they passed a retired spot, they saw at the foot of a lifeless tree, the body of Judas. It was a most revolting sight. His weight had broken the cord by which he had hanged himself to the tree. In falling, his body had been horribly mangled, and dogs were now devouring it. His remains were immediately buried out of sight; but there was less mockery among the throng, and many a pale face revealed the thoughts within. Retribution seemed already visiting those who were guilty of the blood of Jesus.   
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2016, 04:30:22 AM »
This is another sad story in a chapter of the life of Christ. One of His own disciples betrays Him. :(  Like the rich young ruler Judas dis not completely surrender his life to Christ and in so doing we are left with an example of warning. Here is why Judas never fully gave himself over to Christ.

      But Judas did not come to the point of surrendering himself fully to Christ. He did not give up his worldly ambition or his love of money. While he accepted the position of a minister of Christ, he did not bring himself under the divine molding. He felt that he could retain his own judgment and opinions, and he cultivated a disposition to criticize and accuse.   
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2016, 05:50:54 AM »
Judas had a fallen nature. He was aligned with Satan and sin from birth. But, some in life have had a much worse battle to fight because of where they were born and the circumstances surrounding their lives. They have a character that is very hard to change. Judas had Jesus to help him. What hope is there for us who have not had the benefit of good circumstances including being with Jesus?

We have the promises of God and the personal attention and grace extended by Jesus. He knows our every thought. He knows the number of hairs on your head. He knows where you live. He knows just how to draw each of us. But, there is a part for us to play, no matter what anyone else teaches. Our part is immeasurably small, God's part is immeasurably large. Without us doing our part we shall be forever lost. What is our part?

First let us remember some of the promises made that reveal there is no excuse even for the worst sinner not to be saved. How about John 3:16. "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life." "For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.  He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God." John 3:17,18. 

Some we have seen who had fallen very low have become reflections of Christ. Did they have promises also? "Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool." Isaiah 1:18. What is meant by "scarlet"?

All are without excuse for knowing God. And knowing God is the solution for our fallen condition. "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who hold the truth in unrighteousness; Because that which may be known of God is manifest in them; for God hath showed [it] unto them. For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, [even] his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse." Romans 1:18-20.

What went wrong with Judas? If we can understand this, then we understand how important it is to perfect a Christian character while our probation remains open. It is what we do each day that is going to determine what is the final product. Do we understand what each sin will do? Or do we excuse our little sins not knowing they condemn us also, and they are forming a character which unfits us for heaven? Each day Judas was forming habits that would make it more difficult to follow Christ.

     When Mary anointed the Saviour's feet, Judas manifested his covetous disposition. At the reproof from Jesus his very spirit seemed turned to gall. Wounded pride and desire for revenge broke down the barriers, and the greed so long indulged held him in control. This will be the experience of everyone who persists in tampering with sin. The elements of depravity that are not resisted and overcome, respond to Satan's temptation, and the soul is led captive at his will.
     But Judas was not yet wholly hardened. Even after he had twice pledged himself to betray the Saviour, there was opportunity for repentance. At the Passover supper Jesus proved His divinity by revealing the traitor's purpose. He tenderly included Judas in the ministry to the disciples. But the last appeal of love was unheeded. Then the case of Judas was decided, and the feet that Jesus had washed went forth to the betrayer's work. 


When we come into this world, we have a fallen nature and have no "enmity" towards Satan and sin. But, by sinning after we have a knowledge of the God, then we are forming a character that is hardening the heart and making it harder to turn from sin. We read that Judas had not yet hardened his heart past change, but at this point change was very hard since his character was so far along. Yet, there was still hope. He could hear the voice of the Spirit speaking to him. But, he resisted God's love right to the end.

Think about the excuses made for your sins. What we do today to a large degree is going to determine what we do tomorrow. But, Christ can change this. The sooner we surrender our will to His will, the easier it will be to do so. While sin abounds in the world and in our lives, grace much more abounds. We need that grace each day to convert the heart so that we have power to resist the smallest temptation to sin. Sin reveals a separation between man and God, no matter how small or even if it was not premeditated. The only way we can not sin, is to be reconciled to God. And then we must maintain that connection in order to do any good thing.

This is the desire of God, that we be wholly sanctified through the power of His grace. We must feed upon Jesus if we want to have spiritual life. We must know God. "According as his divine power hath given unto us all things that pertain unto life and godliness, through the knowledge of him that hath called us to glory and virtue: Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust." What a promise!!

Lastly, if we want to have a character fit for heaven, then we are told what we must do in order to be changed into that character. It is a secret that most have never heard. Let us make it known by our words and our deeds. "We all, with open face beholding as in a glass the glory of the Lord, are changed into the same image from glory to glory, even as by the Spirit of the Lord." 2 Corinthians 3:18. Amen!! Where can we behold the glory of the Lord?

Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2016, 10:15:21 AM »
One of the best ways to behold the glory of the Lord is in reading the Bible and the Spirit of Prophecy, especially what we are doing together here in reading together from the Desire of Ages. I appreciate the points that you brought out, Richard. The way to salvation is made plain to each of us, and there is no excuse for sin.

Christ's discourse in the synagogue concerning the bread of life was the turning point in the history of Judas. He heard the words, "Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, ye have no life in you." John 6:53. He saw that Christ was offering spiritual rather than worldly good. He regarded himself as farsighted, and thought he could see that Jesus would have no honor, and that He could bestow no high position upon His followers. He determined not to unite himself so closely to Christ but that he could draw away. He would watch. And he did watch.

Let us remember that we are offered from Jesus what we most need--spiritual regeneration, a new heart, and a place with Him in selfless ministry in our own sphere.

It is not the amount of light we receive that determines our standing before God, but whether we have submitted our will to Christ so that He can give us a new heart that makes the difference.

Jesus did ALL THAT HE COULD to redeem Judas--the only reason Judas was lost in his sin was that he resisted the constraining love of Jesus.

We too need to behold the loveliness of Jesus. When we do, we see how unlike Him we are by nature, and that our hearts, if not entirely surrendered to Him now, are still selfish and unable to do any good thing. But when we not only see Jesus' loveliness and our sinfulness, but we take the next step in yielding our will entirely to Him, then we can have a new heart, and that new heart will bring forth all the fruits of the Spirit--not one will be missing.

We see from Judas the lesson that sin is dangerous, for it separates us from our Savior, whom we continually need! Praise the Lord for Jesus!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

colporteur

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2016, 01:28:45 PM »

Several times I have heard ministers use the situation of Jesus allowing Judas to be one of the twelve as a rationalization to let sin run riot among church members and leaders.

Why would we not allow a thief to be the treasurer in church today even though Jesus had one among the twelve ?
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Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2016, 06:36:12 AM »
Yes, cp, we do hear from some that Judas is an example of why we are to allow unconverted men to occupy positions of responsibility. After all, Jesus did just that.  They have a point, but they do not understand the principles involved. They do not understand that much of the difficulties the other disciples encountered were brought about by Judas. He was always fomenting trouble and unbelief. Jesus did not want Judas to be one of the twelve, He tried to discourage him, but Judas pushed himself among the group. Jesus worked with him for a number of reasons. And, yes in included wanting to save him.

     From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.
     When Jesus presented to the rich young ruler the condition of discipleship, Judas was displeased. He thought that a mistake had been made. If such men as this ruler could be connected with the believers, they would help sustain Christ's cause. If Judas were only received as a counselor, he thought, he could suggest many plans for the advantage of the little church. His principles and methods would differ somewhat from Christ's, but in these things he thought himself wiser than Christ.   
     In all that Christ said to His disciples, there was something with which, in heart, Judas disagreed. Under his influence the leaven of disaffection was fast doing its work. The disciples did not see the real agency in all this; but Jesus saw that Satan was communicating his attributes to Judas, and thus opening up a channel through which to influence the other disciples. This, a year before the betrayal, Christ declared. "Have not I chosen you twelve," He said, "and one of you is a devil?" John 6:70. 


At times we may face a similar situation. We may find one who is unconverted in the church, in a position of responsibility. For a number of reasons, we may find it best to work with the individual rather than removing him from his position. This is much different than placing and unconverted person in such a position. And, that person ought never have been brought into the church unconverted, much less baptized by a Seventh-day Adventist pastor. Judas stands on record as to why we ought not do so.

How do we explain this statement: "Christ declared. 'Have not I chosen you twelve,' He said, 'and one of you is a devil?'"
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2016, 09:23:41 AM »
Richard, I appreciated your post, and as I reflect upon John 6:70, it becomes clear that Christ was aware of the unconverted state of Judas, and that Judas was possessed of a devil. We actually read about this earlier in The Desire of Ages, and Jesus already knew that this man was tampering with sin to the extend that Satan was holding him under his power:

Before the Passover Judas had met a second time with the priests and scribes, and had closed the contract to deliver Jesus into their hands. Yet he afterward mingled with the disciples as though innocent of any wrong, and interested in the work of preparing for the feast. The disciples knew nothing of the purpose of Judas. Jesus alone could read his secret. Yet He did not expose him. Jesus hungered for his soul. He felt for him such a burden as for Jerusalem when He wept over the doomed city. His heart was crying, How can I give thee up? The constraining power of that love was felt by Judas. When the Saviour's hands were bathing those soiled feet, and wiping them with the towel, the heart of Judas thrilled through and through with the impulse then and there to confess his sin. But he would not humble himself. He hardened his heart against repentance; and the old impulses, for the moment put aside, again controlled him. Judas was now offended at Christ's act in washing the feet of His disciples. If Jesus could so humble Himself, he thought, He could not be Israel's king. All hope of worldly honor in a temporal kingdom was destroyed. Judas was satisfied that there was nothing to be gained by following Christ. After seeing Him degrade Himself, as he thought, he was confirmed in his purpose to disown Him, and confess himself deceived. He was possessed by a demon, and he resolved to complete the work he had agreed to do in betraying his Lord. {DA 645.1}

We do not know at what point exactly Judas became "possessed by a demon," but it is clear that at the time of the foot washing performed by Christ, Satan had such hold of Judas that Judas chose to continue in the way of perdition. Jesus had done all that could be done to save this poor, wretched man who thought himself wiser than Christ. After Judas left the passover supper, we read that his probation closed (while he was still alive!):

     As they realized the import of His words, and remembered how true His sayings were, fear and self-distrust seized them. They began to search their own hearts to see if one thought against their Master were harbored there. With the most painful emotion, one after another inquired, “Lord, is it I?” But Judas sat silent. John in deep distress at last inquired, “Lord, who is it?” And Jesus answered, “He that dippeth his hand with Me in the dish, the same shall betray Me. The Son of man goeth as it is written of Him: but woe unto that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! it had been good for that man if he had not been born.” The disciples had searched one another's faces closely as they asked, “Lord, is it I?” And now the silence of Judas drew all eyes to him. Amid the confusion of questions and expressions of astonishment, Judas had not heard the words of Jesus in answer to John's question. But now, to escape the scrutiny of the disciples, he asked as they had done, “Master, is it I?” Jesus solemnly replied, “Thou hast said.” {DA 654.2}
     In surprise and confusion at the exposure of his purpose, Judas rose hastily to leave the room. “Then said Jesus unto him, That thou doest, do quickly.... He then having received the sop went immediately out: and it was night.” Night it was to the traitor as he turned away from Christ into the outer darkness. {DA 654.3}
     Until this step was taken, Judas had not passed beyond the possibility of repentance. But when he left the presence of his Lord and his fellow disciples, the final decision had been made. He had passed the boundary line. {DA 654.4}


Another way to say that "He had passed the boundary line" is "He closed his probation in rejecting his Lord's final plea to repent." When we read of Judas in today's chapter, we see Jesus interact with a man who is unrepentant, but who sorrowed over the effects of his sin:

 Judas now cast himself at the feet of Jesus, acknowledging Him to be the Son of God, and entreating Him to deliver Himself. The Saviour did not reproach His betrayer. He knew that Judas did not repent; his confession was forced from his guilty soul by an awful sense of condemnation and a looking for of judgment, but he felt no deep, heartbreaking grief that he had betrayed the spotless Son of God, and denied the Holy One of Israel. Yet Jesus spoke no word of condemnation. He looked pityingly upon Judas, and said, For this hour came I into the world.

Such a sad record of how dangerous it is to tamper with sin and sacred trusts! Let us take heed to the warning!

But what also stands out to me in this chapter is how Christ dealt with this wicked, base man who would stoop to do such a thing. As Judas "repented himself" (Matthew 27:3) it was not true repentance that is the gift of God received into the soul that changes the heart (see how Acts 5:31 speaks of how through Christ, God is able to "give repentance"). Judas' "repentance" was but a response of self, from a man who was lost and whose probation had closed. What more could God do for Judas? Jesus did all He could to save this man, but Judas chose to walk in darkness, to live for self and to cherish the way of the flesh rather than to value the things of the spiritual kingdom. Satan had control of him, because Judas refused the help offered him in Christ.

As I see Jesus' dealings with Judas, I am encouraged to know that this is also how we are to deal with the grievously erring, for we are to do all that is possible to give them opportunity to repent. But like Judas, each will close his or her own probation by coming to the point when they will not turn and any additional light will not be received. Because we do not know when that point is reached as we deal with souls (for we cannot read hearts), let us be kind, patient, and forbearing (by beholding Jesus' loveliness and abiding in Him through His Spirit).

We need Jesus continually to be able to deal graciously with souls who are unconverted, and yet who make a high profession of religion as did Judas. We have no wisdom of ourselves, and it is as we abide in Christ that divine grace is given us in our dealing with souls. Praise the Lord!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #7 on: December 24, 2016, 03:53:43 AM »
It is a sad story. All that Christ did for Judas, yet he betrayed the Son of God.

It is opened to our view that we might learn from the story of Judas.

It is moving that Jesus did not condemn Judas, but pitied him. Are we of the same Spirit? Do we love those who despitefully use us?

When unconverted men are hired by conferences to pastor churches, what is the result? Is it possible Satan can use them in a similar manner as he used Judas? And when blind pastors baptize those who are not converted, is it possible they too could be used as was Judas?

   From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.

It is all too common for pastors and church members to not understand one gives evidence of conversion, therefore the blind continue to baptize and ordain those who like Judas are unconverted.
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Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #8 on: December 24, 2016, 12:16:59 PM »
Amen, Richard! When one reveals all of the fruits of the Spirit, that is true conversion evidence. Such an experience is to be continually maintained by faith.

  The history of Judas presents the sad ending of a life that might have been honored of God. Had Judas died before his last journey to Jerusalem he would have been regarded as a man worthy of a place among the twelve, and one who would be greatly missed. The abhorrence which has followed him through the centuries would not have existed but for the attributes revealed at the close of his history. But it was for a purpose that his character was laid open to the world. It was to be a warning to all who, like him, should betray sacred trusts.

Let us be converted and surrender to all Jesus reveals!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2017, 06:35:09 AM »
In beholding the loveliness of Jesus, we also see the contrast of the character of one who would not yield his life to the Savior. May we experience true repentance, and not follow the evil example of Judas who would not separate from sin:

Judas now cast himself at the feet of Jesus, acknowledging Him to be the Son of God, and entreating Him to deliver Himself. The Saviour did not reproach His betrayer. He knew that Judas did not repent; his confession was forced from his guilty soul by an awful sense of condemnation and a looking for of judgment, but he felt no deep, heartbreaking grief that he had betrayed the spotless Son of God, and denied the Holy One of Israel. Yet Jesus spoke no word of condemnation. He looked pityingly upon Judas, and said, For this hour came I into the world.

Jesus came not to condemn, but to save. In rejecting Jesus' call to repentance, Judas chose the way of destruction. We need Jesus to heal us from sin and to keep us from the way of hardness of heart.
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #10 on: March 21, 2017, 09:24:26 AM »
While reading this chapter is not a joyous occasion, we can appreciate its importance. How do we deal with devils in the church? We do as did Jesus. But, it is not an excuse to place devils in leadership positions in the church. If they are already there, then it may be best to leave them there for a time. Never think that the lesson about Judas allows for the voting into membership or placing in a leadership position one who is not converted. That is a false teaching that has come into God's church. Judas was used by Satan to instigate great trouble in those whom Jesus had chosen as leaders.

    Notwithstanding the Saviour's own teaching, Judas was continually advancing the idea that Christ would reign as king in Jerusalem. At the feeding of the five thousand he tried to bring this about. On this occasion Judas assisted in distributing the food to the hungry multitude. He had an opportunity to see the benefit which it was in his power to impart to others. He felt the satisfaction that always comes in service to God. He helped to bring the sick and suffering from among the multitude to Christ. He saw what relief, what joy and gladness, come to human hearts through the healing power of the Restorer. He might have comprehended the methods of Christ. But he was blinded by his own selfish desires. Judas was first to take advantage of the enthusiasm excited by the miracle of the loaves. It was he who set on foot the project to take Christ by force and make Him king. His hopes were high. His disappointment was bitter. 


So, it was the great deception Satan had brought into the Jewish nation that the Lamb  did not have to die. It was a meritorious sacrifice on the part of the Jew that would elevate the giver. Lost was the significance of the slain Lamb. But, it did not stop with this deception. As we read, Satan used Judas to prosper the idea the Lamb did not come to die, but to reign upon an earthly throne....no matter how many times Jesus said He was going to Jerusalem to die.

Such is result of the error in placing devils in high places in God's church. God give us wisdom to know what to do in situations when they are already there.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2017, 04:50:26 AM »
I was deeply moved by this chapter this morning--seeing all that Christ did to reach Judas, and thinking of how Jesus is that earnest and persevering in His efforts to save us, too. May we learn from the experience of how Christ treated Judas how to deal with the most grievously erring--not to sanction known sin in the church--but to help those who are struggling to come to repentance. Had Judas fully surrendered himself to Jesus, how different would be the chapter we read today--rather than a story of his great guilt in betraying Jesus, a testimony of how great God's grace is to change sinners. But is God's grace not strong enough? No--but grace also includes love, and love never forces its way. God lets us choose if we will believe the wonderful revelation we see in Jesus' character. I receive Jesus anew today, how about you?

But Judas was not yet wholly hardened. Even after he had twice pledged himself to betray the Saviour, there was opportunity for repentance. At the Passover supper Jesus proved His divinity by revealing the traitor's purpose. He tenderly included Judas in the ministry to the disciples. But the last appeal of love was unheeded. Then the case of Judas was decided, and the feet that Jesus had washed went forth to the betrayer's work. 

Let us heed Jesus' invitation today, and never separate from Him by sin. Behold the lovely Jesus constantly today!!!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2017, 05:31:13 AM »
Amen, Pastor Sean. It is dangerous to resist the grace offered. Judas did it for the last time when he refused the grace offered when Jesus washed his feet. Yes, Jesus was his feet, but it did not convert him as it did the other disciples. 

Judas stands on record as to the results if unconverted men are brought into the ministry. We see this today. Many wonder how rebellion has entered the church. We may understand when we review the thoughts and deeds of Judas.

     Christ's discourse in the synagogue concerning the bread of life was the turning point in the history of Judas. He heard the words, "Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, ye have no life in you." John 6:53. He saw that Christ was offering spiritual rather than worldly good. He regarded himself as farsighted, and thought he could see that Jesus would have no honor, and that He could bestow no high position upon His followers. He determined not to unite himself so closely to Christ but that he could draw away. He would watch. And he did watch.
     From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.


Unless self dies, it works selfishness and leads to death. It's influence is not an influence for good.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2017, 06:19:50 AM »
In all that Christ said to His disciples, there was something with which, in heart, Judas disagreed. Under his influence the leaven of disaffection was fast doing its work. The disciples did not see the real agency in all this; but Jesus saw that Satan was communicating his attributes to Judas, and thus opening up a channel through which to influence the other disciples. This, a year before the betrayal, Christ declared. "Have not I chosen you twelve," He said, "and one of you is a devil?" John 6:70.

I know I've said it before and I'm saying it again. I really don't like reading this chapter. It is not pleasant but I understand it's there for a reason and a good reason at that. What is hard for me to relate to is that it sounds like that Judas disagreed with much that Christ said and yet he stayed fostering a rebellious spirit. There have been times in my life that the Word has stepped on my toes in a hard way and deeply convicted me but never was I tempted to disagree with it? How can I? I may not like it at first but disagree? Disagree with God Himself?

Let us all pray for a teachable attitude and learn to love the Words of Christ and even His reproof.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2017, 09:47:19 AM »
Amen, Jim! Reproof may not be comfortable, but it is the heart of infinite love that administers it. Judas' sad ending is laid open to us so that we will not be deceived to think that we can retain one sinful trait in our characters and yet not have it ultimately destroy us. Judas is a clear example of the danger of not surrendering FULLY to Christ. If we do not surrender the heart fully to Christ, who controls us? Satan does, for he controls all whose fallen natures are not crucified with Christ.

I love how Jesus is revealed in the chapter of The Desire of Ages on Judas--Christ did all He could to save Judas, and Christ did all He could to reveal Himself to others when Judas was manifesting the character of Satan.

A murmur of surprise ran through the assembly. With amazement they beheld the forbearance of Christ toward His betrayer. Again there swept over them the conviction that this Man was more than mortal. But if He was the Son of God, they questioned, why did He not free Himself from His bonds and triumph over His accusers?  {The Desire of Ages, page 722, paragraph 3}
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2017, 09:30:52 PM »

I know I've said it before and I'm saying it again. I really don't like reading this chapter. It is not pleasant but I understand it's there for a reason and a good reason at that. What is hard for me to relate to is that it sounds like that Judas disagreed with much that Christ said and yet he stayed fostering a rebellious spirit.

Jim, you are right, it is not pleasant to read such a story, but there is a very good reason to read it. Israel is an ensample for those whom the ends of the world is come upon. How Jesus dealt with Judas is an example for us, but even more important is the lesson we are to learn about how Satan works from within the church to destroy souls and delay the soon coming of Christ.

What we see in this reading is the same thing we see in how Lucifer caused the loss of 1/3 of the heavenly angels. His method of operation has not changed. He has just refined his deceptions to cause millions to follow the path to perdition. We are to learn this lesson and do all we can to keep the church from going down the path any longer.

When Judas heard Christ say "Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, ye have no life in you," he saw that Christ was offering spiritual rather than worldly good.
     From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.

Should we place such a one on the platform in the church?
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #16 on: December 07, 2017, 05:19:32 AM »
Judas now cast himself at the feet of Jesus, acknowledging Him to be the Son of God, and entreating Him to deliver Himself. The Saviour did not reproach His betrayer. He knew that Judas did not repent; his confession was forced from his guilty soul by an awful sense of condemnation and a looking for of judgment, but he felt no deep, heartbreaking grief that he had betrayed the spotless Son of God, and denied the Holy One of Israel. Yet Jesus spoke no word of condemnation. He looked pityingly upon Judas, and said, For this hour came I into the world.

This is how I imagine in the end when every knee shall bow and acknowledge Christ as Lord that lost do it. They are no longer blinded by sin but neither is their character changed. If allowed to live they would again shake their fist at Christ just like the lost do during the last plagues. Let us NOW while there is still yet time truly learn of Christ and His character so that it will soften our hearts and be molded to be like Him. Let us be willing to be the blob of clay that He will shape into something beautiful.


Isaiah 64:8 But now, O Lord, thou art our father; we are the clay, and thou our potter; and we all are the work of thy hand.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #17 on: December 07, 2017, 07:27:13 AM »
Amen, Jim. It is our choice as to whom we shall serve. It is sad that with Bibles all around us, so many do not know Jesus intimately, and believe they are saved even while sinning a known sin. Let us do all we can to establish and maintain our connection with Christ that we might be witnesses and teachers of the truth. If we do not yield our selfish hearts to Christ fully, then we will like Judas be working against our Lord.

Let us take a look at the truth about Judas and what it means to allow those who are not fully surrendered into church membership, or positions of leadership such as Judas held. We shall see why there are so many perplexities in the church of God.

     Christ's discourse in the synagogue concerning the bread of life was the turning point in the history of Judas. He heard the words, "Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink His blood, ye have no life in you." John 6:53. He saw that Christ was offering spiritual rather than worldly good. He regarded himself as farsighted, and thought he could see that Jesus would have no honor, and that He could bestow no high position upon His followers. He determined not to unite himself so closely to Christ but that he could draw away. He would watch. And he did watch.
     From that time he expressed doubts that confused the disciples. He introduced controversies and misleading sentiments, repeating the arguments urged by the scribes and Pharisees against the claims of Christ. All the little and large troubles and crosses, the difficulties and the apparent hindrances to the advancement of the gospel, Judas interpreted as evidences against its truthfulness. He would introduce texts of Scripture that had no connection with the truths Christ was presenting. These texts, separated from their connection, perplexed the disciples, and increased the discouragement that was constantly pressing upon them. Yet all this was done by Judas in such a way as to make it appear that he was conscientious. And while the disciples were searching for evidence to confirm the words of the Great Teacher, Judas would lead them almost imperceptibly on another track. Thus in a very religious, and apparently wise, way he was presenting matters in a different light from that in which Jesus had given them, and attaching to His words a meaning that He had not conveyed. His suggestions were constantly exciting an ambitious desire for temporal preferment, and thus turning the disciples from the important things they should have considered. The dissension as to which of them should be greatest was generally excited by Judas.
     When Jesus presented to the rich young ruler the condition of discipleship, Judas was displeased. He thought that a mistake had been made. If such men as this ruler could be connected with the believers, they would help sustain Christ's cause. If Judas were only received as a counselor, he thought, he could suggest many plans for the advantage of the little church. His principles and methods would differ somewhat from Christ's, but in these things he thought himself wiser than Christ.   
     In all that Christ said to His disciples, there was something with which, in heart, Judas disagreed. Under his influence the leaven of disaffection was fast doing its work. The disciples did not see the real agency in all this; but Jesus saw that Satan was communicating his attributes to Judas, and thus opening up a channel through which to influence the other disciples. This, a year before the betrayal, Christ declared. "Have not I chosen you twelve," He said, "and one of you is a devil?" John 6:70.
     Yet Judas made no open opposition, nor seemed to question the Saviour's lessons. He made no outward murmur until the time of the feast in Simon's house. When Mary anointed the Saviour's feet, Judas manifested his covetous disposition. At the reproof from Jesus his very spirit seemed turned to gall. Wounded pride and desire for revenge broke down the barriers, and the greed so long indulged held him in control. This will be the experience of everyone who persists in tampering with sin. The elements of depravity that are not resisted and overcome, respond to Satan's temptation, and the soul is led captive at his will. 


Some may wonder why the church faces so many problems, even rebellion in the highest ranks. It is because the church remains in a Laodicean condition. Laodicean is a lost state,  but not hopeless. Jesus gave the solution at the same time He reproved us as a people. There are too many who when baptized were not dead to self. Too many in the church were buried alive and believe they are in a saved condition when they are not. It may be hard for many to believe, but this situation has existed from the time a prophet was in the church. Like Judas many of these who do not love Jesus supremely, work in the same manner as did Judas. They take the simple statement of truth and twist it to make it tell a lie. We see this with the rebellion taking place. Simple truths are taken out of context and used to lead many astray.

The new birth is a rare experience in this age of the world. This is the reason why there are so many perplexities in the churches. Many, so many, who assume the name of Christ are unsanctified and unholy. They have been baptized, but they were buried alive. Self did not die, and therefore they did not rise to newness of life in Christ (Manuscript 148, 1897).  6BC 1075.


What does a "rare experience" denote? It means the same thing as does "Laodicean condition." Let us press together and make sure the revival and reformation that is promised begins with us.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #18 on: December 07, 2017, 10:06:49 AM »

The new birth is a rare experience in this age of the world. This is the reason why there are so many perplexities in the churches. Many, so many, who assume the name of Christ are unsanctified and unholy. They have been baptized, but they were buried alive. Self did not die, and therefore they did not rise to newness of life in Christ (Manuscript 148, 1897).  6BC 1075.

What does a "rare experience" denote? It means the same thing as does "Laodicean condition." Let us press together and make sure the revival and reformation that is promised begins with us.

Richard, as I was reflecting on the meaning of the "rare experience" which is spoken of in the the inspired statement as "the new birth," it would actually be the opposite of remaining in a "Laodicean condition," where the soul is not experiencing the new birth (true conversion through a full heart surrender so that all of the fruits of the Spirit are in the life without one missing). Something is rare when there is not much of it in existence. It is so true. Few are TRULY converted. How does Isaiah describe it? "I will make a man more precious than fine gold; even a man than the golden wedge of Ophir" (Isaiah 13:12). But each who will come and learn of Christ can experience a transformation of character, and be truly converted (and remain converted) by a full surrender to Jesus moment by moment.

In reflecting on Judas' experience this morning, I was drawn to reflect also on the case of Lucifer and his fall, and why God allows time for the wicked to reveal their character. It is so that none will be deceived, and that the sympathy which might accrue to the wicked if their real character is not known will be eternally uprooted, and that "affliction shall not rise up the second time" (Nahum 1:9). I praise God for how thorough He is in dealing with evil, even though it takes considerable time and struggle.

"The history of Judas presents the sad ending of a life that might have been honored of God. Had Judas died before his last journey to Jerusalem he would have been regarded as a man worthy of a place among the twelve, and one who would be greatly missed. The abhorrence which has followed him through the centuries would not have existed but for the attributes revealed at the close of his history. But it was for a purpose that his character was laid open to the world. It was to be a warning to all who, like him, should betray sacred trusts." {The Desire of Ages, page 716, paragraph 1}

Could we not say the same of Lucifer? What if he had been immediately blotted out at the outset of rebellion? How many of the angels were sympathetic with him? One-third! And it will only be after the whole controversy is ended that all sympathy with Lucifer, with the wicked, and the ways of sin will be fully and finally uprooted so that we will not have to repeat this terrible experience of sin and suffering--even while still having free will for all of eternity! By beholding the loveliness of Jesus, and the cost He paid to save us from sin, we will forever praise Him and never again tamper with that which caused our precious Jesus infinite pain and suffering.

 
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

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Re: The Desire of Ages--76--Judas
« Reply #19 on: December 07, 2017, 02:19:10 PM »
Amen , pastor Sean. It also comes to mind that if Jesus came today and blotted the wicked out of existence all the questions would still not be answered. Otherwise, Jesus would come today instead of waiting one day longer. Even in this late stage of the game all is not finished in the great controversy. In fact, there is quite a bit to take place yet howbeit in rapid succession. And then after the thousands years there is still a battle that will ensue.
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