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JimB

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The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« on: March 19, 2016, 04:26:38 PM »
Chap. 63 - "Thy King Cometh"

     "Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: He is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass." Zechariah 9:9.  {DA 569.1} 
     Five hundred years before the birth of Christ, the prophet Zechariah thus foretold the coming of the King to Israel. This prophecy is now to be fulfilled. He who has so long refused royal honors now comes to Jerusalem as the promised heir to David's throne. 
     It was on the first day of the week that Christ made His triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Multitudes who had flocked to see Him at Bethany now accompanied Him, eager to witness His reception. Many people were on their way to the city to keep the Passover, and these joined the multitude attending Jesus. All nature seemed to rejoice. The trees were clothed with verdure, and their blossoms shed a delicate fragrance on the air. A new life and joy animated the people. The hope of the new kingdom was again springing up. 
     Purposing to ride into Jerusalem, Jesus had sent two of His disciples to bring to Him an ass and its colt. At His birth the Saviour was dependent upon the hospitality of strangers. The manger in which He lay was a borrowed resting place. Now, although the cattle on a thousand hills are His, He is dependent on a stranger's kindness for an animal on which to enter Jerusalem as its King. But again His divinity is revealed, even in the minute directions given His disciples for this errand. As He foretold, the plea, "The Lord hath need of them," was readily granted. Jesus chose for His use the colt on which never man had sat. The disciples, with glad enthusiasm, spread their garments on the beast, and seated their Master upon it. Heretofore Jesus had always traveled on foot, and the disciples had at first wondered that He should now choose to ride. But hope brightened in their hearts with the joyous thought that He was about to enter the capital, proclaim Himself King, and assert His royal power. While on their errand they communicated their glowing expectations to the friends of Jesus, and the excitement spread far and near, raising the expectations of the people to the highest pitch. 
     Christ was following the Jewish custom for a royal entry. The animal on which He rode was that ridden by the kings of Israel, and prophecy had foretold that thus the Messiah should come to His kingdom. No sooner was He seated upon the colt than a loud shout of triumph rent the air. The multitude hailed Him as Messiah, their King. Jesus now accepted the homage which He had never before permitted, and the disciples received this as proof that their glad hopes were to be realized by seeing Him established on the throne. The multitude were convinced that the hour of their emancipation was at hand. In imagination they saw the Roman armies driven from Jerusalem, and Israel once more an independent nation. All were happy and excited; the people vied with one another in paying Him homage. They could not display outward pomp and splendor, but they gave Him the worship of happy hearts. They were unable to present Him with costly gifts, but they spread their outer garments as a carpet in His path, and they also strewed the leafy branches of the olive and the palm in the way. They could lead the triumphal procession with no royal standards, but they cut down the spreading palm boughs, Nature's emblem of victory, and waved them aloft with loud acclamations and hosannas.
     As they proceeded, the multitude was continually increased by those who had heard of the coming of Jesus and hastened to join the procession. Spectators were constantly mingling with the throng, and asking, Who is this? What does all this commotion signify? They had all heard of Jesus, and expected Him to go to Jerusalem; but they knew that He had heretofore discouraged all effort to place Him on the throne, and they were greatly astonished to learn that this was He. They wondered what could have wrought this change in Him who had declared that His kingdom was not of this world.   
     Their questionings are silenced by a shout of triumph. Again and again it is repeated by the eager throng; it is taken up by the people afar off, and echoed from the surrounding hills and valleys. And now the procession is joined by crowds from Jerusalem. From the multitudes gathered to attend the Passover, thousands go forth to welcome Jesus. They greet Him with the waving of palm branches and a burst of sacred song. The priests at the temple sound the trumpet for evening service, but there are few to respond, and the rulers say to one another in alarm. "The world is gone after Him."   
     Never before in His earthly life had Jesus permitted such a demonstration. He clearly foresaw the result. It would bring Him to the cross. But it was His purpose thus publicly to present Himself as the Redeemer. He desired to call attention to the sacrifice that was to crown His mission to a fallen world. While the people were assembling at Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover, He, the antitypical Lamb, by a voluntary act set Himself apart as an oblation. It would be needful for His church in all succeeding ages to make His death for the sins of the world a subject of deep thought and study. Every fact connected with it should be verified beyond a doubt. It was necessary, then, that the eyes of all people should now be directed to Him; the events which preceded His great sacrifice must be such as to call attention to the sacrifice itself. After such a demonstration as that attending His entry into Jerusalem, all eyes would follow His rapid progress to the final scene.
     The events connected with this triumphal ride would be the talk of every tongue, and would bring Jesus before every mind. After His crucifixion, many would recall these events in their connection with His trial and death. They would be led to search the prophecies, and would be convinced that Jesus was the Messiah; and in all lands converts to the faith would be multiplied.   
     In this one triumphant scene of His earthly life, the Saviour might have appeared escorted by heavenly angels, and heralded by the trump of God; but such a demonstration would have been contrary to the purpose of His mission, contrary to the law which had governed His life. He remained true to the humble lot He had accepted. The burden of humanity He must bear until His life was given for the life of the world.   
     This day, which seemed to the disciples the crowning day of their lives, would have been shadowed with gloomy clouds had they known that this scene of rejoicing was but a prelude to the suffering and death of their Master. Although He had repeatedly told them of His certain sacrifice, yet in the glad triumph of the present they forgot His sorrowful words, and looked forward to His prosperous reign on David's throne. 
     New accessions were made continually to the procession, and, with few exceptions, all who joined it caught the inspiration of the hour, and helped to swell the hosannas that echoed and re-echoed from hill to hill and from valley to valley. The shouts went up continually, "Hosanna to the Son of David: Blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest." 
     Never before had the world seen such a triumphal procession. It was not like that of the earth's famous conquerors. No train of mourning captives, as trophies of kingly valor, made a feature of that scene. But about the Saviour were the glorious trophies of His labors of love for sinful man. There were the captives whom He had rescued from Satan's power, praising God for their deliverance. The blind whom He had restored to sight were leading the way. The dumb whose tongues He had loosed shouted the loudest hosannas. The cripples whom He had healed bounded with joy, and were the most active in breaking the palm branches and waving them before the Saviour. Widows and orphans were exalting the name of Jesus for His works of mercy to them. The lepers whom He had cleansed spread their untainted garments in His path, and hailed Him as the King of glory. Those whom His voice had awakened from the sleep of death were in that throng. Lazarus, whose body had seen corruption in the grave, but who now rejoiced in the strength of glorious manhood, led the beast on which the Saviour rode. 
     Many Pharisees witnessed the scene, and, burning with envy and malice, sought to turn the current of popular feeling. With all their authority they tried to silence the people; but their appeals and threats only increased the enthusiasm. They feared that this multitude, in the strength of their numbers, would make Jesus king. As a last resort they pressed through the crowd to where the Saviour was, and accosted Him with reproving and threatening words: "Master, rebuke Thy disciples." They declared that such noisy demonstrations were unlawful, and would not be permitted by the authorities. But they were silenced by the reply of Jesus, "I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out." That scene of triumph was of God's own appointing. It had been foretold by the prophet, and man was powerless to turn aside God's purpose. Had men failed to carry out His plan, He would have given a voice to the inanimate stones, and they would have hailed His Son with acclamations of praise. As the silenced Pharisees drew back, the words of Zechariah were taken up by hundreds of voices: "Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: He is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass."   
     When the procession reached the brow of the hill, and was about to descend into the city, Jesus halted, and all the multitude with Him. Before them lay Jerusalem in its glory, now bathed in the light of the declining sun. The temple attracted all eyes. In stately grandeur it towered above all else, seeming to point toward heaven as if directing the people to the only true and living God. The temple had long been the pride and glory of the Jewish nation. The Romans also prided themselves in its magnificence. A king appointed by the Romans had united with the Jews to rebuild and embellish it, and the emperor of Rome had enriched it with his gifts. Its strength, richness, and magnificence had made it one of the wonders of the world.
     While the westering sun was tinting and gilding the heavens, its resplendent glory lighted up the pure white marble of the temple walls, and sparkled on its gold-capped pillars. From the crest of the hill where Jesus and His followers stood, it had the appearance of a massive structure of snow, set with golden pinnacles. At the entrance to the temple was a vine of gold and silver, with green leaves and massive clusters of grapes executed by the most skillful artists. This design represented Israel as a prosperous vine. The gold, silver, and living green were combined with rare taste and exquisite workmanship; as it twined gracefully about the white and glistening pillars, clinging with shining tendrils to their golden ornaments, it caught the splendor of the setting sun, shining as if with a glory borrowed from heaven. 
     Jesus gazes upon the scene, and the vast multitude hush their shouts, spellbound by the sudden vision of beauty. All eyes turn upon the Saviour, expecting to see in His countenance the admiration they themselves feel. But instead of this they behold a cloud of sorrow. They are surprised and disappointed to see His eyes fill with tears, and His body rock to and fro like a tree before the tempest, while a wail of anguish bursts from His quivering lips, as if from the depths of a broken heart. What a sight was this for angels to behold! their loved Commander in an agony of tears! What a sight was this for the glad throng that with shouts of triumph and the waving of palm branches were escorting Him to the glorious city, where they fondly hoped He was about to reign! Jesus had wept at the grave of Lazarus, but it was in a godlike grief in sympathy with human woe. But this sudden sorrow was like a note of wailing in a grand triumphal chorus. In the midst of a scene of rejoicing, where all were paying Him homage, Israel's King was in tears; not silent tears of gladness, but tears and groans of insuppressible agony. The multitude were struck with a sudden gloom. Their acclamations were silenced. Many wept in sympathy with a grief they could not comprehend. 
     The tears of Jesus were not in anticipation of His own suffering. Just before Him was Gethsemane, where soon the horror of a great darkness would overshadow Him. The sheepgate also was in sight, through which for centuries the beasts for sacrificial offerings had been led. This gate was soon to open for Him, the great Antitype, toward whose sacrifice for the sins of the world all these offerings had pointed. Near by was Calvary, the scene of His approaching agony. Yet it was not because of these reminders of His cruel death that the Redeemer wept and groaned in anguish of spirit. His was no selfish sorrow. The thought of His own agony did not intimidate that noble, self-sacrificing soul. It was the sight of Jerusalem that pierced the heart of Jesus--Jerusalem that had rejected the Son of God and scorned His love, that refused to be convinced by His mighty miracles, and was about to take His life. He saw what she was in her guilt of rejecting her Redeemer, and what she might have been had she accepted Him who alone could heal her wound. He had come to save her; how could He give her up?
     Israel had been a favored people; God had made their temple His habitation; it was "beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth." Psalm 48:2. The record of more than a thousand years of Christ's guardian care and tender love, such as a father bears his only child, was there. In that temple the prophets had uttered their solemn warnings. There had the burning censers waved, while incense, mingled with the prayers of the worshipers, had ascended to God. There the blood of beasts had flowed, typical of the blood of Christ. There Jehovah had manifested His glory above the mercy seat. There the priests had officiated, and the pomp of symbol and ceremony had gone on for ages. But all this must have an end. Jesus raised His hand,--that had so often blessed the sick and suffering,--and waving it toward the doomed city, in broken utterances of grief exclaimed: "If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace!--" Here the Saviour paused, and left unsaid what might have been the condition of Jerusalem had she accepted the help that God desired to give her,--the gift of His beloved Son. If Jerusalem had known what it was her privilege to know, and had heeded the light which Heaven had sent her, she might have stood forth in the pride of prosperity, the queen of kingdoms, free in the strength of her God-given power. There would have been no armed soldiers standing at her gates, no Roman banners waving from her walls. The glorious destiny that might have blessed Jerusalem had she accepted her Redeemer rose before the Son of God. He saw that she might through Him have been healed of her grievous malady, liberated from bondage, and established as the mighty metropolis of the earth. From her walls the dove of peace would have gone forth to all nations. She would have been the world's diadem of glory.
     But the bright picture of what Jerusalem might have been fades from the Saviour's sight. He realizes what she now is under the Roman yoke, bearing the frown of God, doomed to His retributive judgment. He takes up the broken thread of His lamentation: "But now they are hid from thine eyes. For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side, and shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation."   
     Christ came to save Jerusalem with her children; but Pharisaical pride, hypocrisy, jealousy, and malice had prevented Him from accomplishing His purpose. Jesus knew the terrible retribution which would be visited upon the doomed city. He saw Jerusalem encompassed with armies, the besieged inhabitants driven to starvation and death, mothers feeding upon the dead bodies of their own children, and both parents and children snatching the last morsel of food from one another, natural affection being destroyed by the gnawing pangs of hunger. He saw that the stubbornness of the Jews, as evinced in their rejection of His salvation, would also lead them to refuse submission to the invading armies. He beheld Calvary, on which He was to be lifted up, set with crosses as thickly as forest trees. He saw the wretched inhabitants suffering torture on the rack and by crucifixion, the beautiful palaces destroyed, the temple in ruins, and of its massive walls not one stone left upon another, while the city was plowed like a field. Well might the Saviour weep in agony in view of that fearful scene.
     Jerusalem had been the child of His care, and as a tender father mourns over a wayward son, so Jesus wept over the beloved city. How can I give thee up? How can I see thee devoted to destruction? Must I let thee go to fill up the cup of thine iniquity? One soul is of such value that, in comparison with it, worlds sink into insignificance; but here was a whole nation to be lost. When the fast westering sun should pass from sight in the heavens, Jerusalem's day of grace would be ended. While the procession was halting on the brow of Olivet, it was not yet too late for Jerusalem to repent. The angel of mercy was then folding her wings to step down from the golden throne to give place to justice and swift-coming judgment. But Christ's great heart of love still pleaded for Jerusalem, that had scorned His mercies, despised His warnings, and was about to imbrue her hands in His blood. If Jerusalem would but repent, it was not yet too late. While the last rays of the setting sun were lingering on temple, tower, and pinnacle, would not some good angel lead her to the Saviour's love, and avert her doom? Beautiful and unholy city, that had stoned the prophets, that had rejected the Son of God, that was locking herself by her impenitence in fetters of bondage,--her day of mercy was almost spent!
     Yet again the Spirit of God speaks to Jerusalem. Before the day is done, another testimony is borne to Christ. The voice of witness is lifted up, responding to the call from a prophetic past. If Jerusalem will hear the call, if she will receive the Saviour who is entering her gates, she may yet be saved. 
     Reports have reached the rulers in Jerusalem that Jesus is approaching the city with a great concourse of people. But they have no welcome for the Son of God. In fear they go out to meet Him, hoping to disperse the throng. As the procession is about to descend the Mount of Olives, it is intercepted by the rulers. They inquire the cause of the tumultuous rejoicing. As they question, "Who is this?" the disciples, filled with the spirit of inspiration, answer this question. In eloquent strains they repeat the prophecies concerning Christ:
     Adam will tell you, It is the seed of the woman that shall bruise the serpent's head. 
     Ask Abraham, he will tell you, It is "Melchizedek King of Salem," King of Peace. Genesis 14:18.
     Jacob will tell you, He is Shiloh of the tribe of Judah.  { 
     Isaiah will tell you, "Immanuel," "Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace." Isaiah 7:14; 9:6. 
     Jeremiah will tell you, The Branch of David, "the Lord our Righteousness." Jeremiah 23:6. 
     Daniel will tell you, He is the Messiah. 
     Hosea will tell you, He is "the Lord God of hosts; the Lord is His memorial." Hosea 12:5. 
     John the Baptist will tell you, He is "the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." John 1:29.   
     The great Jehovah has proclaimed from His throne, "This is My beloved Son." Matthew 3:17.   
     We, His disciples, declare, This is Jesus, the Messiah, the Prince of life, the Redeemer of the world. 
     And the prince of the powers of darkness acknowledges Him, saying, "I know Thee who Thou art, the Holy One of God." Mark 1:24.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2016, 04:47:48 AM »
Yet another wonderful chapter from an inspired book. Give us your thoughts.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2016, 07:59:13 AM »
While we are waiting for others to respond, let me share what I have seen today in this most beautiful chapter on the life of Christ.

First, notice these last 25 chapters of Desire of Ages cover the last week before His death until He is reunited with His Father in heaven.

Jesus again weeps, but not as He wept when Lazarus laid in the tomb.

     Israel had been a favored people; God had made their temple His habitation; it was "beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth." Psalm 48:2. The record of more than a thousand years of Christ's guardian care and tender love, such as a father bears his only child, was there. In that temple the prophets had uttered their solemn warnings. There had the burning censers waved, while incense, mingled with the prayers of the worshipers, had ascended to God. There the blood of beasts had flowed, typical of the blood of Christ. There Jehovah had manifested His glory above the mercy seat. There the priests had officiated, and the pomp of symbol and ceremony had gone on for ages. But all this must have an end. Jesus raised His hand,--that had so often blessed the sick and suffering,--and waving it toward the doomed city, in broken utterances of grief exclaimed: "If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace!--" Here the Saviour paused, and left unsaid what might have been the condition of Jerusalem had she accepted the help that God desired to give her,--the gift of His beloved Son. If Jerusalem had known what it was her privilege to know, and had heeded the light which Heaven had sent her, she might have stood forth in the pride of prosperity, the queen of kingdoms, free in the strength of her God-given power. There would have been no armed soldiers standing at her gates, no Roman banners waving from her walls. The glorious destiny that might have blessed Jerusalem had she accepted her Redeemer rose before the Son of God. He saw that she might through Him have been healed of her grievous malady, liberated from bondage, and established as the mighty metropolis of the earth. From her walls the dove of peace would have gone forth to all nations. She would have been the world's diadem of glory.
     But the bright picture of what Jerusalem might have been fades from the Saviour's sight. He realizes what she now is under the Roman yoke, bearing the frown of God, doomed to His retributive judgment. He takes up the broken thread of His lamentation: "But now they are hid from thine eyes. For the days shall come upon thee, that thine enemies shall cast a trench about thee, and compass thee round, and keep thee in on every side, and shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation."   
     Christ came to save Jerusalem with her children; but Pharisaical pride, hypocrisy, jealousy, and malice had prevented Him from accomplishing His purpose. Jesus knew the terrible retribution which would be visited upon the doomed city. He saw Jerusalem encompassed with armies, the besieged inhabitants driven to starvation and death, mothers feeding upon the dead bodies of their own children, and both parents and children snatching the last morsel of food from one another, natural affection being destroyed by the gnawing pangs of hunger. He saw that the stubbornness of the Jews, as evinced in their rejection of His salvation, would also lead them to refuse submission to the invading armies. He beheld Calvary, on which He was to be lifted up, set with crosses as thickly as forest trees. He saw the wretched inhabitants suffering torture on the rack and by crucifixion, the beautiful palaces destroyed, the temple in ruins, and of its massive walls not one stone left upon another, while the city was plowed like a field. Well might the Saviour weep in agony in view of that fearful scene.
     Jerusalem had been the child of His care, and as a tender father mourns over a wayward son, so Jesus wept over the beloved city. How can I give thee up? How can I see thee devoted to destruction? Must I let thee go to fill up the cup of thine iniquity? One soul is of such value that, in comparison with it, worlds sink into insignificance; but here was a whole nation to be lost.


What happened to Jerusalem is not to happen to God's church today. It was prophesied that Israel would be cut off 3 1/2 years after the death of Christ, when Stephen was stoned. But, not so with the last church on this Earth. No, the promises to Israel found in Ezekiel chapters 36 and 37 are for us today. We are "modern Israel". 

 36:22   Therefore say unto the house of Israel, Thus saith the Lord GOD; I do not [this] for your sakes, O house of Israel, but for mine holy name's sake, which ye have profaned among the heathen, whither ye went. 
 36:23   And I will sanctify my great name, which was profaned among the heathen, which ye have profaned in the midst of them; and the heathen shall know that I [am] the LORD, saith the Lord GOD, when I shall be sanctified in you before their eyes. 
 36:24   For I will take you from among the heathen, and gather you out of all countries, and will bring you into your own land. 
 36:25   Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and ye shall be clean: from all your filthiness, and from all your idols, will I cleanse you. 
 36:26   A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh. 
 36:27   And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my judgments, and do [them].
 

Such an important promise!!!
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2016, 09:48:30 AM »
I am reflecting on the blindness of Jesus' disciples who could and should have clearly understood that the Messiah, Jesus, had to die. This is an amazing statement:

 This day, which seemed to the disciples the crowning day of their lives, would have been shadowed with gloomy clouds had they known that this scene of rejoicing was but a prelude to the suffering and death of their Master. Although He had repeatedly told them of His certain sacrifice, yet in the glad triumph of the present they forgot His sorrowful words, and looked forward to His prosperous reign on David's throne.
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2016, 10:19:27 AM »
Amen!   They had been so deceived that they refused to accept the Words of Jesus regarding His death. When He hung on the cross, they doubted His divinity. They lacked spiritual discernment because they wandered in and out of conversion. They did not see their continual need of Jesus, so they allowed their minds to wander away from Him. Without Him they, and we, have no power to resist the smallest sin. Known sin, whether premeditated or not, reveals a separation between man and God.

   Every Christian must stand on guard continually, watching every avenue of the soul where Satan might find access. He must pray for divine help and at the same time resolutely resist every inclination to sin. By courage, by faith, by persevering toil, he can conquer. But let him remember that to gain the victory Christ must abide in him and he in Christ.  Vol 5, Testimonies; pg 47.


As I was contemplating today's reading, the coming of Jesus to Jerusalem caused me to think of Jesus second coming. Jerusalem was not ready for Jesus as their Messiah. Are we ready today? How long before Jesus comes again? It will be soon. Do you want it to be soon? When we look around, we see the condition of the world is as it was just before the great flood wherein God destroyed every living thing off the face of the Earth, except what was in the ark and in the sea.

My thought is that many of us do not want Jesus to come too quickly. Why not? Yet, the last scenes of this Earth's history will be rapid ones. Jesus loves us, just as He revealed His love for Jerusalem. Will He cry in the same manner for you and for me? Today is the day of salvation. Today, by beholding Him and His love we can be converted.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2016, 07:05:16 AM »
Many today do not see the great love God has for the unrepentant sinner. Some have been taught He will burn the wicked for eternity. Others believe God is just waiting for us to sin so He can punish us. Still others think God to be arbitrary and at any moment our probation will close because God has decided our time is up. But, when we read this chapter today we find His character to be quite different. He loves us with a love that far surpasses the love we can have for those we love so very much.

    Before them lay Jerusalem in its glory, now bathed in the light of the declining sun.....     Jesus gazes upon the scene, and the vast multitude hush their shouts, spellbound by the sudden vision of beauty. All eyes turn upon the Saviour, expecting to see in His countenance the admiration they themselves feel. But instead of this they behold a cloud of sorrow. They are surprised and disappointed to see His eyes fill with tears, and His body rock to and fro like a tree before the tempest, while a wail of anguish bursts from His quivering lips, as if from the depths of a broken heart. What a sight was this for angels to behold! their loved Commander in an agony of tears! What a sight was this for the glad throng that with shouts of triumph and the waving of palm branches were escorting Him to the glorious city, where they fondly hoped He was about to reign! Jesus had wept at the grave of Lazarus, but it was in a godlike grief in sympathy with human woe. But this sudden sorrow was like a note of wailing in a grand triumphal chorus. In the midst of a scene of rejoicing, where all were paying Him homage, Israel's King was in tears; not silent tears of gladness, but tears and groans of insuppressible agony. The multitude were struck with a sudden gloom. Their acclamations were silenced. Many wept in sympathy with a grief they could not comprehend.
     The tears of Jesus were not in anticipation of His own suffering. Just before Him was Gethsemane, where soon the horror of a great darkness would overshadow Him. The sheepgate also was in sight, through which for centuries the beasts for sacrificial offerings had been led. This gate was soon to open for Him, the great Antitype, toward whose sacrifice for the sins of the world all these offerings had pointed. Near by was Calvary, the scene of His approaching agony. Yet it was not because of these reminders of His cruel death that the Redeemer wept and groaned in anguish of spirit. His was no selfish sorrow. The thought of His own agony did not intimidate that noble, self-sacrificing soul. It was the sight of Jerusalem that pierced the heart of Jesus--Jerusalem that had rejected the Son of God and scorned His love, that refused to be convinced by His mighty miracles, and was about to take His life. He saw what she was in her guilt of rejecting her Redeemer, and what she might have been had she accepted Him who alone could heal her wound. He had come to save her; how could He give her up?


It was not the temple nor the city He wept over, but the souls for whom He was about to suffer and die for that caused such grief. He would do the same for you or for me. He loves us with an unfathomable love!
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2016, 09:04:11 AM »
Amen, Richard! What unfathomable love! We can be so thankful for the gift of a probationary life in which to form character. Yet there is a limit to God's merciful forbearance. That limit was about to be reached for the precious souls whom Jesus came to save in Jerusalem. They resisted the only way of their salvation. I pray that each of us will continually respond to Christ and His drawing upon our hearts by His Spirit.

 Jerusalem had been the child of His care, and as a tender father mourns over a wayward son, so Jesus wept over the beloved city. How can I give thee up? How can I see thee devoted to destruction? Must I let thee go to fill up the cup of thine iniquity? One soul is of such value that, in comparison with it, worlds sink into insignificance; but here was a whole nation to be lost. When the fast westering sun should pass from sight in the heavens, Jerusalem's day of grace would be ended. While the procession was halting on the brow of Olivet, it was not yet too late for Jerusalem to repent. The angel of mercy was then folding her wings to step down from the golden throne to give place to justice and swift-coming judgment. But Christ's great heart of love still pleaded for Jerusalem, that had scorned His mercies, despised His warnings, and was about to imbrue her hands in His blood. If Jerusalem would but repent, it was not yet too late. While the last rays of the setting sun were lingering on temple, tower, and pinnacle, would not some good angel lead her to the Saviour's love, and avert her doom? Beautiful and unholy city, that had stoned the prophets, that had rejected the Son of God, that was locking herself by her impenitence in fetters of bondage,--her day of mercy was almost spent!

May we see in this picture of love and entreaty an appeal to God's remnant church--God is calling upon His people to repent, and receive the abiding presence of Jesus by His Spirit.

Revelation 3
14 And unto the angel of the church of the Laodiceans write; These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning of the creation of God;
15 I know thy works, that thou art neither cold nor hot: I would thou wert cold or hot.
16 So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.
17 Because thou sayest, I am rich, and increased with goods, and have need of nothing; and knowest not that thou art wretched, and miserable, and poor, and blind, and naked:
18 I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; and white raiment, that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear; and anoint thine eyes with eyesalve, that thou mayest see.
19 As many as I love, I rebuke and chasten: be zealous therefore, and repent.
20 Behold, I stand at the door, and knock: if any man hear my voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with me.
21 To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne.


Sinning one known sin reveals a separation from Christ, the source of life. 

"But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid his face from you, that he will not hear" (Isaiah 59:2).

We cannot rest ourselves on a supposed hope, and nothing more. We cannot make the spiritual standard of those around us our standard of character. Christ is our only Savior and perfect Example. We need the living reality of Jesus' presence in our hearts. Apart from Him we cannot resist one temptation to sin. And as the Israelites resisted Jesus, they were utterly fastening themselves in Satan's grasp. Let us pray, oh pray, for God to give us a living faith experience through continual surrender to our Savior! Without Him abiding in our hearts and minds as evidenced by all of the fruits of the Spirit being in our lives without one missing, we also will be lost. But thank God He mercifully is still calling upon our hearts to turn to Him entirely. I choose Jesus. I pray you will, too.
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2016, 06:23:57 AM »
What love is revealed as Jesus approached Jerusalem. And, what great sorrow!

They are surprised and disappointed to see His eyes fill with tears, and His body rock to and fro like a tree before the tempest, while a wail of anguish bursts from His quivering lips, as if from the depths of a broken heart. What a sight was this for angels to behold! their loved Commander in an agony of tears! .......

The tears of Jesus were not in anticipation of His own suffering. Just before Him was Gethsemane, where soon the horror of a great darkness would overshadow Him. The sheepgate also was in sight, through which for centuries the beasts for sacrificial offerings had been led. This gate was soon to open for Him, the great Antitype, toward whose sacrifice for the sins of the world all these offerings had pointed. Near by was Calvary, the scene of His approaching agony. Yet it was not because of these reminders of His cruel death that the Redeemer wept and groaned in anguish of spirit. His was no selfish sorrow. The thought of His own agony did not intimidate that noble, self-sacrificing soul. It was the sight of Jerusalem that pierced the heart of Jesus--Jerusalem that had rejected the Son of God and scorned His love, that refused to be convinced by His mighty miracles, and was about to take His life. He saw what she was in her guilt of rejecting her Redeemer, and what she might have been had she accepted Him who alone could heal her wound. He had come to save her; how could He give her up?


So is His great love for you and for me!!! How do we respond to His great love? Will we break His heart also? Not if we will behold such love. For, it is by beholding that we become His disciples.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2016, 08:43:12 AM »
Amen, Richard! I was reflecting on your post's opening statement about what love and sorrow we see in Jesus life here, and it reminded me of the words of one my favorite hymn, "My Song Is Love Unknown" (SDAH 188), last line:

Here might I stay and sing,
no story so divine:
never was love, dear King,
never was grief like thine.

This is my friend,
in whose sweet praise
I all my days
could gladly spend.

As we become a true friend of Jesus by beholding His loveliness, we will be transformed in character, elevated in thought, and renewed in mind and heart! I reflect upon these words as well from our reading today:

 Jerusalem had been the child of His care, and as a tender father mourns over a wayward son, so Jesus wept over the beloved city. How can I give thee up? How can I see thee devoted to destruction? Must I let thee go to fill up the cup of thine iniquity? One soul is of such value that, in comparison with it, worlds sink into insignificance; but here was a whole nation to be lost. When the fast westering sun should pass from sight in the heavens, Jerusalem's day of grace would be ended. While the procession was halting on the brow of Olivet, it was not yet too late for Jerusalem to repent. The angel of mercy was then folding her wings to step down from the golden throne to give place to justice and swift-coming judgment. But Christ's great heart of love still pleaded for Jerusalem, that had scorned His mercies, despised His warnings, and was about to imbrue her hands in His blood. If Jerusalem would but repent, it was not yet too late. While the last rays of the setting sun were lingering on temple, tower, and pinnacle, would not some good angel lead her to the Saviour's love, and avert her doom? Beautiful and unholy city, that had stoned the prophets, that had rejected the Son of God, that was locking herself by her impenitence in fetters of bondage,--her day of mercy was almost spent!

Jesus rejoiced when even soul would repent and surrender to His love and entreaties by His Spirit, but to lose even one causes Him indescribable grief! But this was not just one soul perishing in impenitence, but an entire nation! May we also realize the times in which we live, and be actuated by Christ's Spirit to seek out the lost, and to let Him use us. By beholding His character, how He ministered, and the emotions we see expressed in His life, we gain a clear conception of ministry and the heart of our Father in heaven towards a perishing world. Let us pray that we may reveal that love today to those with whom we come in contact!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2017, 05:43:02 AM »
Yet again the Spirit of God speaks to Jerusalem. Before the day is done, another testimony is borne to Christ. The voice of witness is lifted up, responding to the call from a prophetic past. If Jerusalem will hear the call, if she will receive the Saviour who is entering her gates, she may yet be saved.

And so it is with us today. There is yet time to turn, look and live. We still have an intercessor that is pleading for us, Michael has not yet stood up. The Spirit is drawing the hearts of those who are willing. Let's pray for our family, friends, churches, and leadership that all may recognize the times we live in.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2017, 06:00:24 AM »
Amen, Jim! Our probation remains open, but the probation extended to Jerusalem and Israel as a people closed--and so few responded to the call. May we realize how great a Savior we have, and turn our eyes to the kind of victory He works out for those who yield to Him:

 Never before had the world seen such a triumphal procession. It was not like that of the earth's famous conquerors. No train of mourning captives, as trophies of kingly valor, made a feature of that scene. But about the Saviour were the glorious trophies of His labors of love for sinful man. There were the captives whom He had rescued from Satan's power, praising God for their deliverance. The blind whom He had restored to sight were leading the way. The dumb whose tongues He had loosed shouted the loudest hosannas. The cripples whom He had healed bounded with joy, and were the most active in breaking the palm branches and waving them before the Saviour. Widows and orphans were exalting the name of Jesus for His works of mercy to them. The lepers whom He had cleansed spread their untainted garments in His path, and hailed Him as the King of glory. Those whom His voice had awakened from the sleep of death were in that throng. Lazarus, whose body had seen corruption in the grave, but who now rejoiced in the strength of glorious manhood, led the beast on which the Saviour rode. 

To be a captive of Jesus means to truly be set free from thralldom of sin!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2017, 07:30:23 AM »
Amen, Jim and Pastor Sean! Such love!  And, for a people who were soon to murder Him!! Even some who rejoiced at His arrival in Jerusalem would soon call for His crucifixion.

As I read this morning, I saw the "great controversy" being acted out. We see what Satan was up to. Both the church and the state would join hands to put to death the Son of God. Notice how it was the church that was actively inciting the people to turn against Jesus. And, we know it was the church that forced the hand of Pilot to scourge and kill Jesus.

      Many Pharisees witnessed the scene, and, burning with envy and malice, sought to turn the current of popular feeling. With all their authority they tried to silence the people; but their appeals and threats only increased the enthusiasm. They feared that this multitude, in the strength of their numbers, would make Jesus king. As a last resort they pressed through the crowd to where the Saviour was, and accosted Him with reproving and threatening words: "Master, rebuke Thy disciples." They declared that such noisy demonstrations were unlawful, and would not be permitted by the authorities. But they were silenced by the reply of Jesus, "I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out." That scene of triumph was of God's own appointing. It had been foretold by the prophet, and man was powerless to turn aside God's purpose. Had men failed to carry out His plan, He would have given a voice to the inanimate stones, and they would have hailed His Son with acclamations of praise. As the silenced Pharisees drew back, the words of Zechariah were taken up by hundreds of voices: "Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: He is just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass."   


We see here that all of Satan's power is useless when it comes to stopping what God has said will happen. And, we also see that prophecy told the people that they could know when their Messiah would come. So it is today. There are those who see the signs of the times and know the coming of Jesus is near, even at the doors! We also see the tracks of the evil one in what he is doing to turn the world and the church from the invitation of salvation. But, as with the Jews, there is today a remnant that will follow the Lamb withersoever He goeth.

It is true for many probation remains open, but for many Jesus says "because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth." For others, today will be the last day of their probation. We know not who, but some will have resisted His Spirit for the last time. For some their hearts are like the Pharisees who could no longer hear the still small voice calling to repentance.

Jesus stands at the door of many of us, knocking, wanting in. O, let us behold such long-suffering love toward the children of men, and open the door wide that we might have the peace that only grace accepted can bring.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2017, 03:49:59 AM »
Praise the Lord for King Jesus! He was about to be crowned with thorns, and die an ignominious death to save us from sin, and what a glorious opportunity the disciples had of being able to confess their faith in Christ based upon the word of God, even though they did not know that He had to die. Their hopes were raised to the highest pitch, but all this would be worked together for good for them that love God, because they would see how Christ had fulfilled every particular of the prophecies pointing to His life, sufferings, death, resurrection, ascension, and promise to return! Our King also comes soon--in the clouds of glory to take us home--but first we must learn of Him so fully, and realize so completely HIs love for us, that we hate sin as He does, and choose never to separate from our lovely Jesus. Oh Lord, keep us moment-by-moment is my prayer!!

Reports have reached the rulers in Jerusalem that Jesus is approaching the city with a great concourse of people. But they have no welcome for the Son of God. In fear they go out to meet Him, hoping to disperse the throng. As the procession is about to descend the Mount of Olives, it is intercepted by the rulers. They inquire the cause of the tumultuous rejoicing. As they question, "Who is this?" the disciples, filled with the spirit of inspiration, answer this question. In eloquent strains they repeat the prophecies concerning Christ:
     Adam will tell you, It is the seed of the woman that shall bruise the serpent's head. 
     Ask Abraham, he will tell you, It is "Melchizedek King of Salem," King of Peace. Genesis 14:18.
     Jacob will tell you, He is Shiloh of the tribe of Judah.  { 
     Isaiah will tell you, "Immanuel," "Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace." Isaiah 7:14; 9:6. 
     Jeremiah will tell you, The Branch of David, "the Lord our Righteousness." Jeremiah 23:6. 
     Daniel will tell you, He is the Messiah. 
     Hosea will tell you, He is "the Lord God of hosts; the Lord is His memorial." Hosea 12:5. 
     John the Baptist will tell you, He is "the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world." John 1:29.   
     The great Jehovah has proclaimed from His throne, "This is My beloved Son." Matthew 3:17.   
     We, His disciples, declare, This is Jesus, the Messiah, the Prince of life, the Redeemer of the world. 
     And the prince of the powers of darkness acknowledges Him, saying, "I know Thee who Thou art, the Holy One of God." Mark 1:24.


As I was reflecting upon Christ's power to implant enmity in our hearts against sin, and of how Christ is "our Righteousness" when we are fully surrendered to Him (for He works in us), I was impressed by this Spirit of Prophecy statement as well:

Men sometimes become ashamed of their sinful ways, and give up some of their evil habits, before they are aroused to manifestly come to Christ; but it is the power of the gospel, the grace of Christ, that is drawing them to make reformation in their conduct. An influence of which they are unconscious works upon the soul, and the conscience is quickened, and the outward life is amended. And as Christ draws them to look upon his cross, to look upon him whom their sins have pierced, the commandment comes home to the conscience. The wickedness of their life, the deep-seated sin of the soul, is revealed to them. They begin to comprehend something of the righteousness of Christ, and exclaim, “Was all this love, all this suffering, all this humiliation demanded that we might not perish, but have everlasting life?” They then understand that it is the goodness of God that leadeth to repentance. A repentance such as this lies beyond the reach of our own powers to accomplish; it is obtained only from Christ, who ascended up on high, and has given gifts unto men. Christ is the source of every right impulse. He is the only one who can arouse in the natural heart enmity against sin. He is the source of our power if we would be saved. No soul can repent without the grace of Christ. The sinner may pray that he may know how to repent. God reveals Christ to the sinner, and when he sees the purity of the Son of God, he is not ignorant of the character of sin. By faith in the work and power of Christ, enmity against sin and Satan is created in his heart. Those whom God pardons are first made penitent. {RH April 1, 1890 Par. 5}

Hatred against sin is not natural to us--it is a gift from Jesus! Oh, let us behold Him and come to hate sin as He does, and come to love the sinner as He does! All this is ours through this wonderful "thoughtful hour" we get to spend with Jesus morning by morning, renewed with joy and love (and all the fruits of the Spirit) because Christ indwells our hearts through faith as we surrender all to Him!!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2017, 07:21:51 AM »
Amen Pastor Sean.  As we read of the love that Jesus had for Jerusalem, we understand He is speaking to us today also. As we realize the blindness of Israel, we also see ourselves and our church today. Jesus tells us we are as a people miserable, wretched, and poor, blind and naked. This ought to wake us up to our lost condition and our continual need of Jesus.

It is true that God is just. He will not excuse one sin. The wages of one sin is punishment and death. Christ suffered and died that we might live. God's justice does not set aside His mercy. Jesus stands at the door of many hearts today, seeking entrance. Just as Jesus wept over Jerusalem, so He weeps over His people today. He is slow to let even one go. He will speak again to you and to me. He is calling us to His side in the last great battle with evil.

      Yet again the Spirit of God speaks to Jerusalem. Before the day is done, another testimony is borne to Christ. The voice of witness is lifted up, responding to the call from a prophetic past. If Jerusalem will hear the call, if she will receive the Saviour who is entering her gates, she may yet be saved. 
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #14 on: August 29, 2017, 05:22:35 AM »
Jesus gazes upon the scene, and the vast multitude hush their shouts, spellbound by the sudden vision of beauty. All eyes turn upon the Saviour, expecting to see in His countenance the admiration they themselves feel. But instead of this they behold a cloud of sorrow. They are surprised and disappointed to see His eyes fill with tears, and His body rock to and fro like a tree before the tempest, while a wail of anguish bursts from His quivering lips, as if from the depths of a broken heart. What a sight was this for angels to behold! their loved Commander in an agony of tears! What a sight was this for the glad throng that with shouts of triumph and the waving of palm branches were escorting Him to the glorious city, where they fondly hoped He was about to reign! Jesus had wept at the grave of Lazarus, but it was in a godlike grief in sympathy with human woe. But this sudden sorrow was like a note of wailing in a grand triumphal chorus. In the midst of a scene of rejoicing, where all were paying Him homage, Israel's King was in tears; not silent tears of gladness, but tears and groans of insuppressible agony. The multitude were struck with a sudden gloom. Their acclamations were silenced. Many wept in sympathy with a grief they could not comprehend. ..... He had come to save her; how could He give her up?

It's hard for me to believe that we are yet at this point in the story already again. What a picture of Jesus for the imagination! Jesus wailing in sorrow (almost seems wrong for me to type that)!! But why? It wasn't for Himself. Until this morning I had not thought of this before but Christ had a goal when He came to earth and this particular way He was denied His goal. Have you (or I) ever worked to get somewhere or something? We put forth all our effort believing that in the end no matter how much it cost us in time, effort, and resources it would be worth it in the end but in the end only to have to have it swept away from you? Not because of something you did wrong but because of the wrong actions of others? How incredibly hurt and disappointed we would be!! Now magnify that by a few thousand and we might come close to how Christ felt. How terribly disappointing for Jesus! I see it much clearer this morning for some reason. Let's not be like the religious leaders of Christ's time here on earth. Let's make Christ joyous and come into full communion with Him by laying our hearts and wills open for Him to possess. Let's bring Him joy instead of sorrow.


Zephaniah 3:17  The Lord thy God in the midst of thee is mighty; he will save, he will rejoice over thee with joy; he will rest in his love, he will joy over thee with singing.




By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #15 on: August 29, 2017, 07:23:45 AM »
Amen, Jim!

Today I really contemplated how astounding it would be for all to behold--angels as well as the people around Him--as they saw Jesus in deep sorrow and wailing in tears for the loss of not just one soul, but an entire nation of souls! Oh, may we realize more fully the value of souls and go about ministering to others as did Jesus--even if it means that those we long to see converted resist God's Spirit and are lost. Let us not give up--Jesus knew that there would still be some who would repent, and one was so valuable to Him. Let us appreciate all that has been done (and is being done for us now) that we may surrender fully to Christ and be saved, that we may go forth to seek and save others!

Jerusalem had been the child of His care, and as a tender father mourns over a wayward son, so Jesus wept over the beloved city. How can I give thee up? How can I see thee devoted to destruction? Must I let thee go to fill up the cup of thine iniquity? One soul is of such value that, in comparison with it, worlds sink into insignificance; but here was a whole nation to be lost. When the fast westering sun should pass from sight in the heavens, Jerusalem's day of grace would be ended. While the procession was halting on the brow of Olivet, it was not yet too late for Jerusalem to repent. The angel of mercy was then folding her wings to step down from the golden throne to give place to justice and swift-coming judgment. But Christ's great heart of love still pleaded for Jerusalem, that had scorned His mercies, despised His warnings, and was about to imbrue her hands in His blood. If Jerusalem would but repent, it was not yet too late. While the last rays of the setting sun were lingering on temple, tower, and pinnacle, would not some good angel lead her to the Saviour's love, and avert her doom? Beautiful and unholy city, that had stoned the prophets, that had rejected the Son of God, that was locking herself by her impenitence in fetters of bondage,--her day of mercy was almost spent! {The Desire of Ages, page 577, paragraph 3}
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #16 on: August 29, 2017, 10:35:39 PM »
Amen, Pastor Sean.  What value we have. Jesus sees what we may become if we will give Him the whole heart.

Have you (or I) ever worked to get somewhere or something? We put forth all our effort believing that in the end no matter how much it cost us in time, effort, and resources it would be worth it in the end but in the end only to have to have it swept away from you? Not because of something you did wrong but because of the wrong actions of others? How incredibly hurt and disappointed we would be!! Now magnify that by a few thousand and we might come close to how Christ felt. How terribly disappointing for Jesus! I see it much clearer this morning for some reason. Let's not be like the religious leaders of Christ's time here on earth. Let's make Christ joyous and come into full communion with Him by laying our hearts and wills open for Him to possess. Let's bring Him joy instead of sorrow.

Zephaniah 3:17  The Lord thy God in the midst of thee is mighty; he will save, he will rejoice over thee with joy; he will rest in his love, he will joy over thee with singing.

Yes, Jim, we all have seen this, and it does not always result from others actions. I know that when I saw what was important to me being swept away, it brought me to my knees, and to Jesus. Indeed, let us not disappoint Jesus. He is our best Friend as well as our Savior.

The prince of the powers of darkness acknowledges Him, saying, "I know Thee who Thou art, the Holy One of God." Mark 1:24. If Satan recognizes Him as the Holy One, we ought to know this and act like He is the Holy One of God, our Savior and Brother.


Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2017, 05:54:22 AM »
We have great reason to rejoice in the Lord always! Jesus came not to conquer, but to deliver! Those whom He sets free from sin He empowers to go forth and minister WITH HIM, that they may have the joy of heralding His kingdom. While Jesus was going to Jerusalem, His followers were overjoyed at the thought of the kingdom about to be established. But Jesus also knew that the cross lay before Him, and it was His purpose that all would be turned to Him, that they would soon witness His suffering and humiliation to make His crowning sacrifice for our lost world. We also need to behold Jesus' sacrifice that we may be prepared to herald His kingdom in Spirit and in truth! Thank God for the gift of Jesus!

    Never before had the world seen such a triumphal procession. It was not like that of the earth's famous conquerors. No train of mourning captives, as trophies of kingly valor, made a feature of that scene. But about the Saviour were the glorious trophies of His labors of love for sinful man. There were the captives whom He had rescued from Satan's power, praising God for their deliverance. The blind whom He had restored to sight were leading the way. The dumb whose tongues He had loosed shouted the loudest hosannas. The cripples whom He had healed bounded with joy, and were the most active in breaking the palm branches and waving them before the Saviour. Widows and orphans were exalting the name of Jesus for His works of mercy to them. The lepers whom He had cleansed spread their untainted garments in His path, and hailed Him as the King of glory. Those whom His voice had awakened from the sleep of death were in that throng. Lazarus, whose body had seen corruption in the grave, but who now rejoiced in the strength of glorious manhood, led the beast on which the Saviour rode.  {The Desire of Ages, page 572, paragraph 2}
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #18 on: November 24, 2017, 08:13:52 AM »
Yes, the cross lay before Him, but He did not weep over what He was about to suffer. What was the concern upper most in His mind?

     The tears of Jesus were not in anticipation of His own suffering. Just before Him was Gethsemane, where soon the horror of a great darkness would overshadow Him. The sheepgate also was in sight, through which for centuries the beasts for sacrificial offerings had been led. This gate was soon to open for Him, the great Antitype, toward whose sacrifice for the sins of the world all these offerings had pointed. Near by was Calvary, the scene of His approaching agony. Yet it was not because of these reminders of His cruel death that the Redeemer wept and groaned in anguish of spirit. His was no selfish sorrow. The thought of His own agony did not intimidate that noble, self-sacrificing soul. It was the sight of Jerusalem that pierced the heart of Jesus--Jerusalem that had rejected the Son of God and scorned His love, that refused to be convinced by His mighty miracles, and was about to take His life. He saw what she was in her guilt of rejecting her Redeemer, and what she might have been had she accepted Him who alone could heal her wound. He had come to save her; how could He give her up?


Jesus does love us!! He would have suffered and died just for you if you were the only one to accept His offer of salvation. How sad that many do not know of this great love for them personally. God help us to learn of Him who gave all for us. that we might love Him supremely.   
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--63--Thy King Cometh
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2018, 06:00:32 AM »
Yet again the Spirit of God speaks to Jerusalem. Before the day is done, another testimony is borne to Christ. The voice of witness is lifted up, responding to the call from a prophetic past. If Jerusalem will hear the call, if she will receive the Saviour who is entering her gates, she may yet be saved.

While we know what happens this is still another revelation about the loving character of God. Even up to the seemingly very end God was ready to wrap His loving arms around the city. But it's religious leadership couldn't put down their pride and become humble. It also shows how hard it is to turn after many years of resistance. While it's talking about the city here the same is true for a person. How much better and easier it is to come to Christ with a surrendered heart in the time of youth then to wait to turn on your death bed. I do believe that death bed conversions happen but I also believe that it becomes harder the longer one waits.

Today is the day of salvation!
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}