Author Topic: Binding Aspects of the Mosaic Law  (Read 59898 times)

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Mimi

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Binding Aspects of the Mosaic Law
« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2007, 01:58:00 PM »
Here it is, Richard and Arnold:

The SOP tells us the judgments and statutes guarded the Ten Commandments ...

June 17, 1880 The Law of Moses.
-
By Mrs. E. G. White.
-

    The Lord did not leave his people with the precepts of the decalogue alone. Moses was commanded to write, as God should bid him, judgments and laws giving minute directions in regard to their duty, thereby guarding the commandments engraved on the tables of stone. Thus did the Lord seek to lead erring man to a strict obedience to that holy law which he is so prone to transgress. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 1}

    If man had kept the law of God, as given to Adam after his fall, preserved in the ark by Noah, and observed by Abraham, there would have been no necessity for the ordinance of circumcision. And if the descendants of Abraham had kept the covenant, of which circumcision was a token or pledge, they would never have gone into idolatry, nor been suffered to go down into Egypt; and there would have been no necessity for God to proclaim his law from Sinai, engraving it upon tables of stone, or guard it by definite directions in the judgments and statutes given to Moses. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 2}

    Moses wrote these judgments and statutes from the mouth of God while he was with him in the mount. The definite directions in regard to the duty of his people to one another, and to the stranger, are the principles of the ten commandments simplified and given in a definite manner, that they need not err. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 3}

    The Lord said of the children of Israel, "Because they had not executed my judgments, but had despised my statutes, and had polluted my Sabbaths, and their eyes were after their fathers' idols, wherefore I gave them also statutes that were not good, and judgments whereby they should not live." Because of continual disobedience, the Lord annexed penalties to the transgression of his law, which were not good for the transgressor, or whereby he should not live in his rebellion. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 4}

    By transgressing the law which God had given in such majesty, and amid glory which was unapproachable, the people showed open contempt of the great Lawgiver, and death was the penalty. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 5}

    "Moreover also, I gave them my Sabbaths, to be a sign between me and them, that they might know that I am the Lord that sanctify them. But the house of Israel rebelled against me in the wilderness: they walked not in my statutes, and they despised my judgments, which if a man do, he shall even live in them; and my Sabbaths they greatly polluted. Then I said, I would pour out my fury upon them in the wilderness, to consume them." {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 6}

    The statutes and judgments given of God were good for the obedient. "They shall live in them." But they were not good for the transgressor; for in the civil law given to Moses, punishment was to be inflicted on the transgressor, that others should be restrained by fear. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 7}

    Moses charged the children of Israel to obey God. He said unto them, "Now therefore hearken, O Israel, unto the statutes and unto the judgments, which I teach you, for to do them, that ye may live, and go in and possess the land which the Lord God of your fathers giveth you." {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 8}

    The Lord gave Moses definite instructions in regard to the ceremonial offerings which were to cease at the death of Christ. This system, first established with Adam after his fall, and taught by him to his descendants, was corrupted before the flood, and also by those who separated themselves from the faithful followers of God, and engaged in the building of the tower of Babel. They had no faith in the Redeemer to come, and they sacrificed to gods of their own choosing, instead of the God of Heaven. Their superstition led them to great extravagances. They taught the people that the more valuable their offerings, the greater would be the pleasure of their gods, and consequently the greater the prosperity and riches of their nation. Hence, human beings were often sacrificed to these senseless idols. Many of the laws which governed these nations were cruel in the extreme. They were made by men whose hearts were not softened by divine grace, and while the most debasing crimes were passed over lightly, a small offense would be visited by the most cruel punishment. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 9}

    Moses had this in view when he said to Israel, "Behold, I have taught you statutes and judgments, even as the Lord my God commanded me, that ye should do so in the land whither ye go to possess it. Keep, therefore, and do them; for this is your wisdom and your understanding in the sight of the nations which shall hear all these statutes, and say, Surely this great nation is a wise and understanding people. For what nation is there so great, who hath God so nigh unto them, as the Lord our God is in all things that we call upon him for? and what nation is there so great, that hath statutes and judgments so righteous as all this law, which I set before you this day?" {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 10}

    God was a wise and compassionate lawgiver, judging all cases righteously, and without partiality. While the Israelites were in Egyptian bondage, they were surrounded with idolatry. The Egyptians were regarded as the most learned nation then in existence, and their worship was conducted with great pomp and ceremony. Other nations held the most cruel and absurd traditions as a part of their religion, and revolting customs found a place in their idolatrous service. Prominent among these was the practice of causing their children to pass through the fire,--to leap over the altar upon which a fire was burning before their idol. If a person could do this without injury, the people received it as evidence that the god accepted their offerings, and favored especially the one who had passed through the fiery ordeal. He was loaded with benefits, and was ever afterward greatly esteemed by all the people. He was never punished however aggravated might be his crimes. Should another person be burned in passing through the fire, his fate was sealed; the people believed that their gods were angry and could be appeased only by the life of the unhappy victim, and he was accordingly offered as a sacrifice. Even some of the children of Israel had so far degraded themselves as to practice these abominations. The Lord manifested his displeasure by causing the fire to consume their children in the act of passing through it. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 11}

    Because the people of God had confused ideas of the sacrificial offerings, and mingled heathen customs with their ceremonial worship, the Lord condescended to give them definite directions, that they might understand the true import of those sacrifices which were to last only till the Lamb of God should be slain, who was the great Antitype of all their sacrificial offerings. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 12}

    Moses understood the plan of salvation through Christ, by these sacrificial offerings, and by the manifestation of his glory which he had been permitted to behold. The perfection of God's goodness, his image, his excellency and glory had been revealed to him. He saw the suffering, self-denial and self-sacrifice of Him who was one with the Father, to save fallen man. It had been revealed to Moses that the glory enshrouded in the pillar of cloud was the Son of the infinite God, whom the sacrificial offerings typified. In answer to his most earnest pleadings, "Show me thy way," the future had been opened before him when the type would meet antitype in the death of Christ. He saw mercy and justice blended in harmony and love expressed without a parallel. Israel was just as fully and amply saved through Christ as we are-today. Moses had the assurance that the Mediator of Israel had the guardianship of his people, and that he was just the protection which their necessities required. If disaster came upon them, if their enemies prevailed against them in battle, it was the rebuke of God upon them because they had sinned and in sinning had broken the law of God. {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 13}


This Signs of the Times article is astoundingly enlightening and has caused me to edit this post. The statutes and judgments were a hedge, so to speak, guarding the Ten Commandments.  

And however we look at these laws and judgments that were meant to teach the COI the various aspects of the TC, we know the health laws are still binding - we do know this ... can we agree that they are still binding?

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-23-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

JimB

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Binding Aspects of the Mosaic Law
« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2007, 02:05:00 PM »
I also will start digging up what I can. I am anxious to develop some principles that will aid us in deciding which ones are still binding.

I agree that the health laws are still binding. It only makes sense to me since the physiology of the pig did not magically change at the cross.

However, are all the hygiene laws still binding?

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Mimi

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« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2007, 02:08:00 PM »
Again, having to edit this post because of a seemingly better understanding, the statues and judgments have a direct bearing on the Ten Commandments and must be laid over them and decided upon which ones are related to God, Commandments 1 through 4 and which ones are related to man, 5 through 10.

Civil laws typically relate to how man is to treat man.

I am thinking ... bear with me as I am from Texas and am slower than most!  ;D

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-23-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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Binding Aspects of the Mosaic Law
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2007, 02:16:00 PM »
   
quote:
Originally posted by Jim B:

However, are all the hygiene laws still binding?


Outside the ceremonial system? Like burying human excrement instead of wasting good fresh water to flush it away? Good question ... my first impression is that they are, indeed,  because they are directly related to the health of the individual and of those around the individual, but let's find out!


[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-23-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2007, 02:29:00 PM »
This is going to be a huge job of categorizing  on second thought. Let's begin with Exodus 21 - the judgments and take them as they come.

KJV-R (Webster) Exodus 21:1 Now these arethe judgments which thou shalt set before them.

2 If thou buy an Hebrew servant, six years he shall serve: and in the seventh he shall go out free for nothing.

3 If he came in by himself, he shall go out by himself: if he were married, then his wife shall go out with him.

4 If his master have given him a wife, and she have born him sons or daughters; the wife and her children shall be her master's, and he shall go out by himself.

5 And if the servant shall plainly say, I love my master, my wife, and my children; I will not go out free:

6 Then his master shall bring him unto the judges; he shall also bring him to the door, or unto the door post; and his master shall bore his ear through with an aul; and he shall serve him for ever.

7 And if a man sell his daughter to be a maidservant, she shall not go out as the menservants do.

8 If she please not her master, who hath betrothed her to himself, then shall he let her be redeemed: to sell her unto a strange nation he shall have no power, seeing he hath dealt deceitfully with her.

9 And if he have betrothed her unto his son, he shall deal with her after the manner of daughters.

10 If he take him another wife; her food, her raiment, and her duty of marriage, shall he not diminish.

11 And if he do not these three unto her, then shall she go out free without money.

12 He that smiteth a man, so that he die, shall be surely put to death.

13 And if a man lie not in wait, but God deliver himinto his hand; then I will appoint thee a place whither he shall flee.

14 But if a man come presumptuously upon his neighbour, to slay him with guile; thou shalt take him from mine altar, that he may die.

15 And he that smiteth his father, or his mother, shall be surely put to death.

16 And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.

17 And he that curseth his father, or his mother, shall surely be put to death.

18 And if men strive together, and one smite another with a stone, or with hisfist, and he die not, but keepeth hisbed:

19 If he rise again, and walk abroad upon his staff, then shall he that smote himbe quit: only he shall pay forthe loss of his time, and shall cause himto be thoroughly healed.

20 And if a man smite his servant, or his maid, with a rod, and he die under his hand; he shall be surely punished.

21 Notwithstanding, if he continue a day or two, he shall not be punished: for he is his money.

22 If men strive, and hurt a woman with child, so that her fruit depart from her, and yet no mischief follow: he shall be surely punished, according as the woman's husband will lay upon him; and he shall pay as the judges determine.

23 And if anymischief follow, then thou shalt give life for life,

24 Eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot,

25 Burning for burning, wound for wound, stripe for stripe.

26 And if a man smite the eye of his servant, or the eye of his maid, that it perish; he shall let him go free for his eye's sake.

27 And if he smite out his manservant's tooth, or his maidservant's tooth; he shall let him go free for his tooth's sake.

28 If an ox gore a man or a woman, that they die: then the ox shall be surely stoned, and his flesh shall not be eaten; but the owner of the ox shall bequit.

29 But if the ox were wont to push with his horn in time past, and it hath been testified to his owner, and he hath not kept him in, but that he hath killed a man or a woman; the ox shall be stoned, and his owner also shall be put to death.

30 If there be laid on him a sum of money, then he shall give for the ransom of his life whatsoever is laid upon him.

31 Whether he have gored a son, or have gored a daughter, according to this judgment shall it be done unto him.

32 If the ox shall push a manservant or a maidservant; he shall give unto their master thirty shekels of silver, and the ox shall be stoned.

33 And if a man shall open a pit, or if a man shall dig a pit, and not cover it, and an ox or an ass fall therein;

34 The owner of the pit shall make itgood, andgive money unto the owner of them; and the dead beastshall be his.

35 And if one man's ox hurt another's, that he die; then they shall sell the live ox, and divide the money of it; and the dead ox also they shall divide.

36 Or if it be known that the ox hath used to push in time past, and his owner hath not kept him in; he shall surely pay ox for ox; and the dead shall be his own.

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #25 on: May 23, 2007, 02:43:00 PM »
Exodus 21 clearly has to do with Commandments Five through Ten. How we deal with people and their property: slaves, husbands and wives and parents. Notice there are some death penalty offenses listed.

Verse 12 - smiting a man so that he dies - you die. Sixth Commandment

Verse 15 - smiting father or mother - you die. Fifth Commandment

Verse 16 - steal a person (kidknapping a slave?) - you die. Eighth Commandment

Verse 17 - cursing father or mother - you die. Fifth Commandment

Verse 23 - life for life. Sixth Commandment

Verse 29 - you have an ox that kills and you do not notify people of it and it kills someone - you and the ox die. Ninth Commandment

These are all commandment based - they are still binding but the state does not enforce them except for murder and even special circumstances, at that.


[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-23-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2007, 02:58:00 PM »
Time for a question ... and be gentle with me as I have six thousand years of sin and degradation, along with inherited sinful tendencies - as this question is burning in my mind at this point in my schooling on this subject.

Why did we quit killing witches, sorcerers, adulterers, idolators, rebellious children who cursed parents, homosexuals, and people who defamed the Sabbath?

Is it because we became a secular society and got accustomed to the sin and just let it slide, like so many things these days, or chose more "civilized ways" to deal with it?  

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-23-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2007, 05:48:00 PM »
KJV-R (Webster) Exodus 22:1 If a man shall steal an ox, or a sheep, and kill it, or sell it; he shall restore five oxen for an ox, and four sheep for a sheep.

2 If a thief be found breaking up, and be smitten that he die, there shall no blood be shedfor him.

3 If the sun be risen upon him, there shall beblood shedfor him; forhe should make full restitution; if he have nothing, then he shall be sold for his theft.

4 If the theft be certainly found in his hand alive, whether it be ox, or ass, or sheep; he shall restore double.

5 If a man shall cause a field or vineyard to be eaten, and shall put in his beast, and shall feed in another man's field; of the best of his own field, and of the best of his own vineyard, shall he make restitution.

6 If fire break out, and catch in thorns, so that the stacks of corn, or the standing corn, or the field, be consumed therewith; he that kindled the fire shall surely make restitution.

7 If a man shall deliver unto his neighbour money or stuff to keep, and it be stolen out of the man's house; if the thief be found, let him pay double.

8 If the thief be not found, then the master of the house shall be brought unto the judges, to seewhether he have put his hand unto his neighbour's goods.

9 For all manner of trespass, whether it befor ox, for ass, for sheep, for raiment, orfor any manner of lost thing, which anotherchallengeth to be his, the cause of both parties shall come before the judges; andwhom the judges shall condemn, he shall pay double unto his neighbour.

10 If a man deliver unto his neighbour an ass, or an ox, or a sheep, or any beast, to keep; and it die, or be hurt, or driven away, no man seeing it:

11 Thenshall an oath of the LORD be between them both, that he hath not put his hand unto his neighbour's goods; and the owner of it shall accept thereof, and he shall not make it good.

12 And if it be stolen from him, he shall make restitution unto the owner thereof.

13 If it be torn in pieces, thenlet him bring it forwitness, andhe shall not make good that which was torn.

14 And if a man borrow oughtof his neighbour, and it be hurt, or die, the owner thereof beingnot with it , he shall surely make it good.

15 But if the owner thereof bewith it, he shall not make itgood: if it bean hired thing, it came for his hire.

16 And if a man entice a maid that is not betrothed, and lie with her, he shall surely endow her to be his wife.

17 If her father utterly refuse to give her unto him, he shall pay money according to the dowry of virgins.

18 Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live.

19 Whosoever lieth with a beast shall surely be put to death.

20 He that sacrificeth unto anygod, save unto the LORD only, he shall be utterly destroyed.

21 Thou shalt neither vex a stranger, nor oppress him: for ye were strangers in the land of Egypt.

22 Ye shall not afflict any widow, or fatherless child.

23 If thou afflict them in any wise, and they cry at all unto me, I will surely hear their cry;

24 And my wrath shall wax hot, and I will kill you with the sword; and your wives shall be widows, and your children fatherless.

25 If thou lend money to any of my people that ispoor by thee, thou shalt not be to him as an usurer, neither shalt thou lay upon him usury.

26 If thou at all take thy neighbour's raiment to pledge, thou shalt deliver it unto him by that the sun goeth down:

27 For that ishis covering only, it ishis raiment for his skin: wherein shall he sleep? and it shall come to pass, when he crieth unto me, that I will hear; for I amgracious.

28 Thou shalt not revile the gods, nor curse the ruler of thy people.

29 Thou shalt not delay to offerthe first of thy ripe fruits, and of thy liquors: the firstborn of thy sons shalt thou give unto me.

30 Likewise shalt thou do with thine oxen, and with thy sheep: seven days it shall be with his dam; on the eighth day thou shalt give it me.

31 And ye shall be holy men unto me: neither shall ye eat any flesh that is torn of beasts in the field; ye shall cast it to the dogs.

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Cop

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« Reply #28 on: May 23, 2007, 10:52:00 PM »
 
quote:
Originally posted by Sybil:
Time for a question ... and be gentle with me as I have six thousand years of sin and degradation, along with inherited sinful tendencies - as this question is burning in my mind at this point in my schooling on this subject.

Why did we quit killing witches, sorcerers, adulterers, idolators, rebellious children who cursed parents, homosexuals, and people who defamed the Sabbath?

Is it because we became a secular society and got accustomed to the sin and just let it slide, like so many things these days, or chose more "civilized ways" to deal with it?  

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-23-2007).]


Good question! I've been wondering when, or if, this very question would come up. Where is the command or direction from God saying the penalty proclaimed against these sins has been repealed? Have we becomed so "civilized" that we have turned against God's commands in this?


Mimi

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« Reply #29 on: May 24, 2007, 06:42:00 AM »
Brother Cop: I have not yet looked for it and from the appearance of things, it probably does not exist.


  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #30 on: May 24, 2007, 08:05:00 AM »
 
quote:
Originally posted by Jim B:

However, are all the hygiene laws still binding?


SOP on this issue and a few others:

Ministry of Healing Chap. 21 - Hygiene Among the Israelites

    In the teaching that God gave to Israel, the preservation of health received careful attention. The people who had come from slavery with the uncleanly and unhealthful habits which it engenders, were subjected to the strictest training in the wilderness before entering Canaan. Health principles were taught and sanitary laws enforced.  {MH 277.1}

               Prevention of Disease

    Not only in their religious service, but in all the affairs of daily life was observed the distinction between clean and unclean. All who came in contact with contagious or contaminating diseases were isolated from the encampment, and they were not permitted to return without thorough cleansing of both the person and the clothing. In the case of one afflicted with a contaminating disease, the direction was given:  {MH 277.2}
   
"Every bed, whereon he lieth, . . . is unclean: and everything, whereon he sitteth, shall be unclean. And whosoever toucheth his bed shall wash his clothes, and bathe himself in water, and be unclean until the even. And he that sitteth on anything whereon he sat . . . shall wash his clothes, and bathe himself in water, and be unclean until the even. And he that toucheth the flesh of him . . . shall wash his clothes,and bathe himself in water
                                                                 , and be unclean until the even. . . . And whosoever toucheth anything that was under him shall be unclean until the even: and he that beareth any of those things shall wash his clothes, and bathe himself in water, and be unclean until the even. And whomsoever he toucheth . . . and hath not rinsed his hands in water, he shall wash his clothes, and bathe himself in water, and be unclean until the even. And the vessel of earth, that he toucheth, . . . shall be broken: and every vessel of wood shall be rinsed in water." Leviticus 15:4-12.  {MH 277.3}
   
The law concerning leprosy is also an illustration of the thoroughness with which these regulations were to be enforced:  {MH 278.1}
   
"All the days wherein the plague shall be in him [the leper] he shall be defiled; he is unclean: he shall dwell alone; without the camp shall his habitation be. The garment also that the plague of leprosy is in, whether it be a woolen garment, or a linen garment; whether it be in the warp, or woof; of linen, or of woolen; whether in a skin, or in anything made of skin; . . . the priest shall look upon the plague: . . . if the plague be spread in the garment, either in the warp, or in the woof, or in a skin, or in any work that is made of skin; the plague is a fretting leprosy; it is unclean. He shall therefore burn that garment, whether warp or woof, in woolen or in linen, or anything of skin, wherein the plague is: for it is a fretting leprosy; it shall be burnt in the fire." Leviticus 13:46-52.  {MH 278.2}
   
So, too, if a house gave evidence of conditions that rendered it unsafe for habitation, it was destroyed. The priest was to "break down the house, the stones of it, and the timber thereof, and all the mortar of the house; and he shall carry them forth out of the city into an unclean place. Moreover
                                                                        he that goeth into the house all the while that it is shut up shall be unclean until the even. And he that lieth in the house shall wash his clothes; and he that eateth in the house shall wash his clothes." Leviticus 14:45-47.  {MH 278.3}

                    Cleanliness

    The necessity of personal cleanliness was taught in the most impressive manner. Before gathering at Mount Sinai to listen to the proclamation of the law by the voice of God, the people were required to wash both their persons and their clothing. This direction was enforced on pain of death. No impurity was to be tolerated in the presence of God.  {MH 279.1}
   
During the sojourn in the wilderness the Israelites were almost continually in the open air, where impurities would have a less harmful effect than upon the dwellers in close houses. But the strictest regard to cleanliness was required both within and without their tents. No refuse was allowed to remain within or about the encampment. The Lord said:                                                                            

    "The Lord thy God walketh in the midst of thy camp, to deliver thee, and to give up thine enemies before thee; therefore shall thy camp be holy." Deuteronomy 23:14.  {MH 280.1}

                       Diet

    The distinction between clean and unclean was made in all matters of diet:  {MH 280.2}
   
"I am the Lord thy God, which have separated you from other people. Ye shall therefore put difference between clean beasts and unclean, and between unclean fowls and clean: and ye shall not make your souls abominable by beast, or by fowl, or by any manner of living thing, . . . which I have separated from you as unclean." Leviticus 20:24, 25.  {MH 280.3}
   
Many articles of food eaten freely by the heathen about them were forbidden to the Israelites. It was no arbitrary distinction that was made. The things prohibited were unwholesome. And the fact that they were pronounced unclean taught the lesson that the use of injurious foods is defiling. That which corrupts the body tends to corrupt the soul. It unfits the user for communion with God, unfits him for high and holy service.  {MH 280.4}
   
In the Promised Land the discipline begun in the wilderness was continued under circumstances favorable to the formation of right habits. The people were not crowded together in cities, but each family had its own landed possession, ensuring to all the health-giving blessings of a natural, unperverted life.  {MH 280.5}
   
Concerning the cruel, licentious practices of the Canaanites, who were dispossessed by Israel, the Lord said:  {MH 280.6}
   
"Ye shall not walk in the manners of the nation, which I cast out before you: for they committed all these things, and therefore I abhorred them." Verse 23. "Neither shalt thou
                                                                          bring an abomination into thine house, lest thou be a cursed thing like it." Deuteronomy 7:26.  {MH 280.7}
   
In all the affairs of their daily life, the Israelites were taught the lesson set forth by the Holy Spirit:  {MH 281.1}
   
"Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you? If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which temple ye are." 1 Corinthians 3:16, 17.  {MH 281.2}

                     Rejoicing

    "A merry [rejoicing] heart doeth good like a medicine." Proverbs 17:22. Gratitude, rejoicing, benevolence, trust in God's love and care--these are health's greatest safeguard. To the Israelites they were to be the very keynote of life.  {MH 281.3}
   
The journey made three times a year to the annual feasts at Jerusalem, the week's sojourn in booths during the Feast of Tabernacles, were opportunities for outdoor recreation and social life. These feasts were occasions of rejoicing, made sweeter and more tender by the hospitable welcome given to the stranger, the Levite, and the poor.  {MH 281.4}
   
"Rejoice in every good thing which the Lord thy God hath given unto thee, and unto thine house, thou, and the Levite, and the stranger that is among you." Deuteronomy 26:11.  {MH 281.5}
   
So, in later years, when the law of God was read in Jerusalem to the captives returned from Babylon, and the people wept because of their transgressions, the gracious words were spoken:  {MH 281.6}
   
"Mourn not. . . . Go your way, eat the fat, and drink the sweet, and send portions unto them for whom nothing is prepared: for this day is holy unto our Lord: neither be ye sorry; for the joy of the Lord is your strength." Nehemiah 8:9, 10                                                                            

And it was published and proclaimed "in all their cities, and in Jerusalem, saying, Go forth unto the mount, and fetch olive branches, and pine branches, and myrtle branches, and palm branches, and branches of thick trees, to make booths, as it is written. So the people went forth, and brought them, and made themselves booths, everyone upon the roof of his house, and in their courts, and in the courts of the house of God, and in the street of the water gate, and in the street of the gate of Ephraim.
                                                                         
And all the congregation of them that were come again out of the captivity made booths, and sat under the booths. . . . And there was very great gladness." Verses 15-17.  {MH 282.1}
   
God gave to Israel instruction in all the principles essential to physical as well as to moral health, and it was concerning these principles no less than concerning those of the moral law that He commanded them:  {MH 283.1}
   
"These words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. And thou shalt bind them for a sign upon thine hand, and they shall be as frontlets between thine eyes. And thou shalt write them upon the posts of thy house, and on thy gates." Deuteronomy 6:6-9.  {MH 283.2}
   
"And when thy son asketh thee in time to come, saying, What mean the testimonies, and the statutes, and the judgments, which the Lord our God hath commanded you? Then thou shalt say unto thy son, . . . The Lord commanded us to do all these statutes, to fear the Lord our God, for our good always, that He might preserve us alive, as it is at this day." Verses 20-24.  {MH 283.3}
   
Had the Israelites obeyed the instruction they received, and profited by their advantages, they would have been the world's object lesson of health and prosperity. If as a people they had lived according to God's plan, they would have been preserved from the diseases that afflicted other nations. Above any other people they would have possessed physical strength and vigor of intellect. They would have been the mightiest nation on the earth. God said:  {MH 283.4}
   
"Thou shalt be blessed above all people." Deuteronomy 7:14.
                                                                           
   
"The Lord hath avouched thee this day to be His peculiar people, as He hath promised thee, and that thou shouldest keep all His commandments; and to make thee high above all nations which He hath made, in praise, and in name, and in honor; and that thou mayest be an holy people unto the Lord thy God, as He hath spoken." Deuteronomy 26:18, 19.  {MH 284.1}
   
"And all these blessings shall come on thee, and overtake thee, if thou shalt hearken unto the voice of the Lord thy God. Blessed shalt thou be in the city, and blessed shalt thou be in the field. Blessed shall be the fruit of thy body, and the fruit of thy ground, and the fruit of thy cattle, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep. Blessed shall be thy basket and thy store. Blessed shalt thou be when thou comest in, and blessed shalt thou be when thou goest out." Deuteronomy 28:2-6.  {MH 284.2}
   
"The Lord shall command the blessing upon thee in thy storehouses, and in all that thou settest thine hand unto; and He shall bless thee in the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee. The Lord shall establish thee an holy people unto Himself, as He hath sworn unto thee, if thou shalt keep the commandments of the Lord thy God, and walk in His ways. And all people of the earth shall see that thou art called by the name of the Lord; and they shall be afraid of thee. And the Lord shall make thee plenteous in goods, in the fruit of thy body, and in the fruit of thy cattle, and in the fruit of thy ground, in the land which the Lord sware unto thy fathers to give thee. The Lord shall open unto thee His good treasure, the heaven to give the rain unto thy land in his season, and to bless all the work of thine hand. . . . And the Lord shall make thee the head, and not the tail; and thou shalt be above only, and thou shalt not be beneath; if that thou hearken unto                                                                               the commandments of the Lord thy God, which I command thee this day, to observe and to do them." Verses 8-13.  {MH 284.3}
   
To Aaron the high priest and his sons the direction was given:  {MH 285.1}
    "On this wise ye shall bless the children of Israel, saying unto them,


    "Jehovah bless thee, and keep thee:
     Jehovah make His face to shine upon thee,
     And be gracious unto thee:
     Jehovah lift up His countenance upon thee,
     And give thee peace.
     So shall they put My name upon the children of Israel;
     And I will bless them."


    "As thy days, so shall thy strength be.
     There is none like unto God, O Jeshurun,
     Who rideth upon the heaven for thy help,
     And in His excellency on the skies.
     The eternal God is thy dwelling place,
     And underneath are the everlasting arms. . . .
     Israel dwelleth in safety,
     The fountain of Jacob alone,


    "In a land of corn and wine;
     Yea, His heavens drop down dew.
     Happy art thou, O Israel:
     Who is like unto thee, a people saved by the Lord,
     The shield of thy help,
     And that is the sword of thy excellency!"
                    Numbers 6:23; 6:24-27, A.R.V.;
                      Deuteronomy 33:25-29, R.V.  {MH 285.2}
   
The Israelites failed of fulfilling God's purpose, and thus failed of receiving the blessings that might have been theirs. But in Joseph and Daniel, in Moses and Elisha, and many others, we have noble examples of the results of the true plan of living. Like faithfulness today will produce like results. To us it is written:
                                                                           
    "Ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should show forth the praises of Him who hath called you out of darkness into His marvelous light." 1 Peter 2:9.


    "Blessed is the man that trusteth in the Lord,
      And whose hope the Lord is."
    He "shall flourish like the palm tree:
      He shall grow like a cedar in Lebanon.
    Those that be planted in the house of the Lord
      Shall flourish in the courts of our God.
    They shall still bring forth fruit in old age."
      "They shall be vigorous and covered with foliage."


    "Let thine heart keep My commandments:
     For length of days, and long life,
     And peace, shall they add to thee."
    "Then shalt thou walk in thy way safely,
     And thy foot shall not stumble.
     When thou liest down, thou shalt not be afraid:
     Yea, thou shalt lie down, and thy sleep shall be sweet.
     Be not afraid of sudden fear,
     Neither of the desolation of the wicked, when it cometh.
     For the Lord shall be thy confidence,
     And shall keep thy foot from being taken."
             Jeremiah 17:7; Psalm 92:12-14; 92:14, Leeser;
                                    Proverbs 3:1, 2, 23-26.  {MH 286.1}

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #31 on: May 24, 2007, 08:12:00 AM »
Regarding the additional statutes and judgments, the SOP says this in Patriarchs and Prophets:

That the obligations of the Decalogue might be more fully understood and enforced, additional precepts were given, illustrating and applying the principles of the Ten Commandments. These laws were called judgments, both because they were framed in infinite wisdom and equity and because the magistrates were to give judgment according to them. Unlike the Ten Commandments, they were delivered privately to Moses, who was to communicate them to the people.  {PP 310.1}
   
The first of these laws related to servants. In ancient times criminals were sometimes sold into slavery by the judges; in some cases, debtors were sold by their creditors; and poverty even led persons to sell themselves or their children. But a Hebrew could not be sold as a slave for life. His term of service was limited to six years; on the seventh he was to be set at liberty. Manstealing, deliberate murder, and rebellion against parental authority were to be punished with death. The holding of slaves not of Israelitish birth was permitted, but their life and person were strictly guarded. The murderer of a slave was to be punished; an injury inflicted upon one by his master, though no more than the loss of a tooth, entitled him to his freedom.  {PP 310.2}

    The Israelites had lately been servants themselves, and now that they were to have servants under them, they were to beware of indulging the spirit of cruelty and exaction from which they had suffered under their Egyptian taskmasters. The memory of their own bitter servitude should enable them to put themselves in the servant's place, leading them to be kind and compassionate, to deal with others as they would wish to be dealt with.  {PP 310.3}

    The rights of widows and orphans were especially guarded, and a tender regard for their helpless condition was enjoined.                                                                            "If thou afflict them in any wise," the Lord declared, "and they cry at all unto Me, I will surely hear their cry; and My wrath shall wax hot, and I will kill you with the sword; and your wives shall be widows, and your children fatherless." Aliens who united themselves with Israel were to be protected from wrong or oppression. "Thou shalt not oppress a stranger: for ye know the heart of a stranger, seeing ye were strangers in the land of Egypt."  {PP 310.4}
   
The taking of usury from the poor was forbidden. A poor man's raiment or blanket taken as a pledge, must be restored to him at nightfall. He who was guilty of theft was required to restore double. Respect for magistrates and rulers was enjoined, and judges were warned against perverting judgment, aiding a false cause, or receiving bribes. Calumny and slander were prohibited, and acts of kindness enjoined, even toward personal enemies.  {PP 311.1}
   
Again the people were reminded of the sacred obligation of the Sabbath. Yearly feasts were appointed, at which all the men of the nation were to assemble before the Lord, bringing to Him their offerings of gratitude and the first fruits of His bounties. The object of all these regulations was stated: they proceeded from no exercise of mere arbitrary sovereignty; all were given for the good of Israel. The Lord said, "Ye shall be holy men unto Me"--worthy to be acknowledged by a holy God.  {PP 311.2}
   
These laws were to be recorded by Moses, and carefully treasured as the foundation of the national law, and, with the ten precepts which they were given to illustrate, the condition of the fulfillment of God's promises to Israel.  {PP 311.3}

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2007, 08:22:00 AM »
The law of God existed before the creation of man or else Adam could not have sinned. After the transgression of Adam the principles of the law were not changed, but were definitely arranged and expressed to meet man in his fallen condition. Christ, in counsel with His Father, instituted the system of sacrificial offerings; that death, instead of being immediately visited upon the transgressor, should be transferred to a victim which should prefigure the great and perfect offering of the son of God (Ibid., March 14, 1878).  {1BC 1104.5}
   
Precepts Given to Guard Decalogue.--In consequence of continual transgression, the moral law was repeated in awful grandeur from Sinai. Christ gave to Moses religious precepts which were to govern everyday life. These statutes were explicitly given to guard the ten commandments. They were not shadowy types to pass away with the death of Christ. They were to be binding upon men in every age as long as time should last. These commands were enforced by the power of the moral law, and they clearly and definitely explained that law (Ibid., April 15, 1875).  {1BC 1104.6}

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-24-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2007, 09:10:00 AM »
It is interesting that the SOP does not separate those statutes and judgments that applied to a specific time or place - she makes rather a blanket statement saying they "were" to be binding for all ages.
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2007, 10:18:00 AM »
From EGW comments in the SDA Bible Commentary regarding statutes and judgments. We cannot help but see how these are still binding.

1, 2. Become Familiar With Levitical Law.--We are to become familiar with the Levitical law in all its bearings; for it contains rules that must be obeyed; it contains the instruction that if studied will enable us to understand better the rule of faith and practice that we are to follow in our dealings with one another. No soul has any excuse for being in darkness. Those who receive Christ by faith will receive also power to become the sons of God (Letter 3, 1905).  {1BC 1110.4}


Agricultural and Tithing Laws a Test. --The tithing system was instituted by the Lord as the very best arrangement to help the people in carrying out the principles of the law. If this law were obeyed, the people would be entrusted with the entire vineyard, the whole earth. [Quotes Lev. 25:18-22.] . . .  {1BC 1112.5}
   
Men were to cooperate with God in restoring the diseased land to health, that it might be a praise and a glory to His name. And as the land they possessed would, if managed with skill and earnestness, produce its treasures, so their hearts, if controlled by God, would reflect His character. . . .  {1BC 1112.6}
   
In the laws which God gave for the cultivation of the soil, He was giving the people opportunity to overcome their selfishness and become heavenly-minded. Canaan would be to them as Eden if they obeyed the Word of the Lord. Through them the Lord designed to teach all the nations of the world how to cultivate the soil so that it would yield healthy fruit, free from disease. The earth is the Lord's vineyard, and is to be treated according to His plan. Those who cultivated the soil were to realize that they were doing God service. They were as truly in their lot and place as were the men appointed to minister in the priesthood and in work connected with the tabernacle. God told the people that the Levites were a gift to them, and no matter what their trade, they were to help to support them (Ibid.).

Diet Modified Disposition, Activated Mind. --The state of the mind has largely to do with the health of the body, and especially with the health of the digestive organs. As a general thing, the Lord did not provide His people with flesh meat in the desert, because He knew that the use of this diet would create disease and                                                                              insubordination. In order to modify the disposition, and bring the higher powers of the mind into active exercise, He removed from them the flesh of dead animals. He gave them angel's food, manna from heaven (MS 38, 1898).  {1BC 1112.8}


No Thread of Selfishness in Web of Life.--Deuteronomy contains much instruction regarding what the law is to us, and the relation we shall sustain to God as we reverence and obey His law.  {1BC 1118.6}
   
We are God's servants, doing His service. Into the great web of life we are to draw no thread of selfishness; for this would spoil the pattern. But, oh, how thoughtless men are apt to be! How seldom do they make the interests of God's suffering ones their own. The poor are all around them, but they pass on, thoughtless and indifferent, regardless of the widows and orphans who, left without resources, suffer, but do not tell their need. If the rich would place a small fund in the bank, at the disposal of the needy ones, how much suffering would be saved. The holy love of God should lead every one to see that it is his duty to care for some other one, and thus keep alive the spirit of benevolence. . . . With what goodness, mercy, and love God lays His requirements before His children, telling them what they
                                                                           1119
are to do. He honors us by making us His helping hand. Instead of complaining, let us rejoice that we have the privilege of serving under so good and merciful a Master (Letter 112, 1902).  {1BC 1118.7}


No Uncleanness of Body, Word, or Spirit. --In order to be acceptable in God's sight, the leaders of the people were to give strict heed to the sanitary condition of the armies of Israel, even when they went forth to battle. Every soul, from the commander-in-chief to the lowest soldier in the army, was sacredly charged to preserve cleanliness in his person and surroundings; for the Israelites were chosen by God as His peculiar people. They were sacredly bound to be holy in body and spirit. They were not to be careless or neglectful of their personal duties. In every respect they were to preserve cleanliness. They were to allow nothing untidy or unwholesome in their surroundings, nothing which would taint the purity of the atmosphere. Inwardly and outwardly they were to be pure [Deut. 23:14 quoted] (Letter 35, 1901).  {1BC 1119.4}
   
We know His will, and any departure from it to follow ideas of your own is a dishonor to His name, a reproach to His sacred truth. Everything that relates to the worship of God on earth, is to bear in appearance a striking resemblance to heavenly things. There must be no careless disregard in these things, if you expect the Lord to favor you with His presence. He will not have His work placed on a level with common, temporal things (MS 7, 1889).  {1BC 1119.5}
   
All those who come into His presence should give special attention to the body and the clothing. Heaven is a clean and holy place. God is pure and holy. All who come into His presence should take heed to His directions, and have the body and the clothing in a pure, clean condition, thus showing respect to themselves and to Him. The heart must also be sanctified. Those who do this will not dishonor His sacred name by worshiping Him while their hearts are polluted and their apparel is untidy.
                                                                         
God sees these things. He marks the heart- preparation, the thoughts, the cleanliness in appearance, of those who worship Him (MS 126 1901).  {1BC 1119.6}

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mimi

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« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2007, 02:10:00 PM »
Jim and I have come up with five categories for the OT civil laws. If anyone can discover more, please advise.

Ceremonial, health, hygiene, agricultural and civil.

For the sake of this examination, we will not address the ceremonial aspects of the first five books of the Bible. And we will label the judgments into one of the remaining  categories and whether or not they are still applicable today.

How's that?

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-25-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Liane H

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« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2007, 02:34:00 PM »
I came across this statement and do not see it here, so let me share:

"It would be a scene well-pleasing to God and angels, would His professed followers in this generation unite, as did Israel of old [referring especially to the revival in the days of Nehemiah], in a solemn covenant to "observe and do all the commandments of the Lord our Lord, and his judgments and his statutes" (SW June 7, 1904).  {3BC 1139.2}

So does the word all apply to the judgments and statutes?

------------------
Liane, the Zoo Mama
Romans 8:19   For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God.

Liane, the Zoo Mama
Romans 8:19   For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God.

Mimi

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« Reply #37 on: May 24, 2007, 02:47:00 PM »
Liane: I believe the SOP can even answer that:

 

quote:
They were not shadowy types to pass away with the death of Christ. They were to be binding upon men in every age as long as time should last. These commands were enforced by the power of the moral law, and they clearly and definitely explained that law (Ibid., April 15, 1875). {1BC 1104.6}

Also - from everything I have read, it appears that the statutes belonging to hygiene also apply to us today.

[This message has been edited by Sybil (edited 05-24-2007).]

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

asygo

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« Reply #38 on: May 24, 2007, 02:48:00 PM »
Thanks to Sis Sybil, I got the quotes I was thinking about. Here they are, all together:

quote:
    The minds of the people, blinded and debased by slavery and heathenism, were not prepared to appreciate fully the far-reaching principles of God's ten precepts. That the obligations of the Decalogue might be more fully understood and enforced, additional precepts were given, illustrating and applying the principles of the Ten Commandments. These laws were called judgments, both because they were framed in infinite wisdom and equity and because the magistrates were to give judgment according to them. Unlike the Ten Commandments, they were delivered privately to Moses, who was to communicate them to the people.  {PP 310.1}

    Moses wrote these judgments and statutes from the mouth of God while he was with him in the mount. If the people of God had obeyed the principles of the ten commandments, there would have been no need of the specific directions given to Moses, which he wrote in a book, relative to their duty to God and to one another. The definite directions which the Lord gave to Moses in regard to the duty of his people to one another, and to the stranger, are the principles of the ten commandments simplified and given in a definite manner, that they need not err.  {1SP 265.1}

    In consequence of continual transgression, the moral law was repeated in awful grandeur from Sinai. Christ gave to Moses religious precepts which were to govern the everyday life. These statutes were explicitly given to guard the ten commandments. They were not shadowy types to pass away with the death of Christ. They were to be binding upon man in every age as long as time should last. These commands were enforced by the power of the moral law, and they clearly and definitely explained that law.  {RH, May 6, 1875 par. 10}

    Moses wrote these judgments and statutes from the mouth of God while he was with him in the mount. The definite directions in regard to the duty of his people to one another, and to the stranger, are the principles of the ten commandments simplified and given in a definite manner, that they need not err.  {ST, June 17, 1880 par. 3}


These statements seem to say that the statutes were based on the 10C, and therefore are just as binding today. WDYT?

------------------
By God's grace,
Arnold M. Sy Go
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By God's grace,
Arnold M. Sy Go
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Mimi

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« Reply #39 on: May 24, 2007, 02:53:00 PM »
Arnold, my brother! Glad to see you once more!

Yes - when they are solidly attached to the Ten Commandments, they are binding.

What do you think of the four categories thus far? Can you think of any others we have missed?

  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89