Author Topic: Raised Bed Gardens  (Read 20884 times)

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Dorine

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #60 on: May 16, 2013, 03:44:56 PM »
Wow I wonder what has happened. I will try and repost the pictures that have been deleted. I checked Photobucket out and they are still there. Thank you Mimi.
But this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press  toward the mark. Phil. 3:13,14

Dorine

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #61 on: May 16, 2013, 04:06:34 PM »


This is a raised bed with bell peppers, sweet basil, and yellow eyed beans. Not a weed all summer with the wood chips down.



Note the difference in a bed of sage with no wood chips. Could not keep up to the weeds.



My tomato patch was the same. Not a weed.



Another tomato patch. This was the first year for the Eva Purple tomato and I'm hooked. All my tomatoes this year are from seed saved from 2012. I have about 150 plants in my greenhouse this year. Extra's are sold for investment.



This is my woodchip pile that is running low. What a back breaking job this was to collect but it has been worth it so far.


But this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press  toward the mark. Phil. 3:13,14

Mimi

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #62 on: May 16, 2013, 06:44:42 PM »
Oh, Dorine! What a beauty! I am so happy for you. I have a smaller version of your first one and it is mighty humble, but it is my first time out of the chute, as they say. The chips make a world of difference. I plan on using them, too. Am also going to use hay bales. A friend has a beautiful start on her garden and it is all hay bales.

Now, something funny happened the other day when I went to check on the potatoes. The hay had sprouted and was growing while the potatoes were doing nothing, so I removed most of it until the potato leaves begin to come up. Thought that was hysterical!
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Dorine

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #63 on: May 17, 2013, 05:40:27 AM »
When my wood chip pile is gone I will start using hay also. I use leaves and seaweed for the paths between the beds. I have a few more pictures to post that I will take this morning.
I had to smile at your experience with the hay and potatoes. Do you think that will be a problem? I've heard conflicting views on using hay but it's all I have access to once the chips are gone.
But this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press  toward the mark. Phil. 3:13,14

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #64 on: June 12, 2013, 04:16:25 PM »
My son has a problem with deer also. :(     He has raised beds.  He bent pvc over the beds and then covered the beds with netting. It works. Today, I did some research on different drip systems for raised beds. While looking around I found something I think is fantastic.  It is a support system for raised bed covers. I like it because it does not require expensive pvc connectors. Instead it uses heat to bend the pvc.  pvc is available in 20 ft lengths. Here is a video explaining the process. I think you will like it.

Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Mimi

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #65 on: July 16, 2013, 04:52:52 PM »
 ;D Have been eating homegrown kale and chard from my garden for the very first time in my life. What a blessing! And today, the drink of the day is a watermelon and banana smoothie. What a great combination on a summer's day! Wish it got hot enough to grow melons at this altitude. Can't have it all. Get this: The temperature outside is presently 66o. I wasn't going to say anything but it is so unusual that it is worth a mention. The monsoons have begun and for the first time this summer, the fields are green. Am so blest! 
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #66 on: July 16, 2013, 10:05:51 PM »
Growing bananas is good enough. You can buy the watermelons!  :)  66? Is that cool ? At the elevation you are at, it would not seem unusual. On the other hand, a 66 day in New Mexico sounds pretty cool! Is this a portent of things to come?  I am planning on living on Kale when the time comes. Kale and collards. Congratulations! Good job!!!
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Mimi

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #67 on: July 22, 2013, 08:30:52 PM »
Little garden update. I had to move the squash a month ago to a warmer bed. If you can believe it, I planted it way too early, yet it still only has four leaves and is very small. It may not grow well at this altitude. :( We simply do not have the heat to sustain it.

The kale and chard are so very happy and green and tall and lush! I have been pulling plants and eating of them daily and sharing with friends. What a blessing. Same with the lettuces. Just glorious. This afternoon, I started my third and fourth plantings of lettuce and a second crop of kale. Those, along with the tomatoes will probably be the limit of what I can grow. Am very happy, very pleased and grateful to God for this experience. 
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Mark W

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #68 on: July 22, 2013, 09:22:23 PM »
Well Mimi, what you got growing is probably some of the best stuff for you. Got to love them greens. I would branch out into more line of the same like cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts maybe. Might even try some asian greens like bok choi or asian cabbage. If you can get a tomato to grow then you should be able to plant some early potatoes, or many of the other cool weather root crops. Look at Territorial Seed catalog on line or ask for one for they and Fedco seed do some catering to those in cool climates. 

Mimi

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #69 on: July 23, 2013, 05:09:48 AM »
Thanks, Mark, I will. My neighbor is having great success with broccoli and cabbage. My broccoli is just coming up. And, we are experimenting with new potatoes. I harvested a dozen of them (I suspected a problem with sour soil) and discovered the organic russet turned to mush while the reds were perfect, so that is what I will pursue in a much longer, sandy bed. There should be time for a second crop.

The cilantro is doing well, too.  The German, Zebra and Roma tomato plants are loaded with fruit. What excitement!
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #70 on: July 25, 2013, 05:26:02 PM »
Amen!! God is so very GOOD!  It is exciting to see the plants then the fruit and veggies coming along.  I found out why I have no squash. Never before did the dear eat them, but now they eat the blooms, the leaves, and the fruit!! Going to cover them up!!!
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Mimi

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #71 on: July 25, 2013, 05:59:13 PM »
Yes, cover them up while you round up some buck shot and spray the deer quite thoroughly! I'm serious. Or, use rubber bullets. They get the message very quickly. It took 4 rounds of rubber bullets to scare away our resident bobcat. It was determined to stay and continue eating our domesticated animals, but the pain of that 4th bullet convinced him to leave and not return. He had our neighbor's cat in his mouth at the time of his departure.  :( 
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #72 on: October 22, 2013, 11:58:25 AM »
The raised beds are making gardening a little easier. And, I have not had to buy gas for the tiller. That is a good thing since we know in the future things will be more difficult. We can learn to garden without tilling open ground also. Where the soil needs a lot of amending, the raised beds seem to be a good choice.

I got a good buy on some redwood 2x6s, so I put together a new bed yesterday. Leveling the ground was the hardest and took the most time in creating the raised bed. But, if you have not tried making one, it is very easy. Buy three 8 foot 2x6s. Cut one in half, Home Depot will do it for you. You now have your  sides and end pieces. I lay them out on the ground to get the dimensions on the ground, to know where it must be leveled. When I get the ground close, I then place two or three screws in each corner and finish the leveling.  You can double dig before or after, or you don't need to dig at all. I think you will be better off digging down if you have enough good replacement soil to go deeper with it. Or if your soil is good, then double digging is going to loosen it up.

In my other beds, I placed chicken wire on the bottom to keep out the gophers. I did not on this bed. We will see how it works. I never used chicken wire on my open bed gardens, and did not have a lot of trouble with gophers even though they make a mess in the lawn.


Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Mimi

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #73 on: October 22, 2013, 12:30:56 PM »
Excellent! What is your fall crop, Richard?
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #74 on: October 22, 2013, 02:09:42 PM »
If you are speaking of what is already growing, there is kale, collards, chard, spinach, carrots, and snow peas. If you are looking at the empty bed, I am not sure. Thinking about some garlic and more carrots.  I am also thinking that I might cover it or a smaller bed and try to keep the greens growing through the winter.  The collards and kale survive the winter, but stop growing in the cold weather. If I can cover them, then the sun will heat the soil on sunny, but cold days. That ought to cause them to keep growing so we can eat them all winter. Just a thought. I am growing more concerned about commercial food. And, a thinking ahead. My neighbor introduced a new thought as I shared this with him. He said that if I would burn my cutting torch in the enclosed space, the plants will thrive on the carbon dioxide given off.  :)  As it stands, according to Al Gore, my plants don't need any extra co2, they already have too much.  And, if you believe that, the Golden Gate Bridge is for sale.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #75 on: October 23, 2013, 12:26:17 PM »
When encouraging how easy it is to make a raised bed, I suggested 2x6 boards.  You could even use 2x4 boards. It depends on what you are wanting to plant, how fertile your soil is and if you are going to double dig down. Most of my beds are 2x8 boards. Some will place another board on top of the first creating a much deeper bed. That will be more expensive for the boards and the soil to fill the bed. 

If you have never built a raised  bed, you might want to make the first one very easy. Use 2x4s and make it small. Maybe 2 feet by 4 feet. Plant flowers or lettuce. See how easy it is to make and how much fun it is to weed!!   I think I may have talked myself into making one.  :)
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #76 on: June 06, 2014, 01:06:04 PM »
Dorine, thank you for sharing. I am posting this photo for you. I finally got the wood chips in the bed instead of in the pathways!!



And, thank you, Mark. Those are tomato plants from your seeds.  They are doing well, except for one Brandywine that came from the store.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Dorine

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #77 on: June 06, 2014, 01:58:32 PM »
Looks good Richard. I think a mulched raised bed looks so neat and clean. I notice your plants are spaced at quite a distance from each other. Is that so you can tend them easier or are you going to plant other things with them?
But this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press  toward the mark. Phil. 3:13,14

Richard Myers

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #78 on: June 06, 2014, 07:58:58 PM »
They will take up the room. At least they did last year. They were too close. I am hoping that this will be about right. Most of the heirlooms were reaching for seven feet when my support gave way. Not sure what will happen this year. :)

Notice the chips are like yours. All wood and no leaf.  I separated the logs from the junk and got a small amount of wood chips. I know they will not break down as fast, but they look nice and are easy to work with.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

colporteur

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Re: Raised Bed Gardens
« Reply #79 on: February 27, 2017, 04:44:53 PM »

I have done a fair bit of research on treated wood for raised beds. I am hearing everything from bad news to harmless. Arsenic was the biggest concern with the idea that it may leach into the soil and be picked up by the plants. While that being a safety hazard has always been controversial they say that arsenic is no longer used in treating wood. Copper is still used and apparently some chemicals but any information on what that includes seems to be very evasive. The verdict by the most wary seems to be "we really don't know so better to err on the side of safety." There seems to be some consensus that to use heavy plastic liner on the inside of the boards is a good idea in most any bed #1 because it will largely waterproof the boards and make them last longer and #2 if the boards are treated plastic will keep any leaching to a minimum. I am planning to put in 20, 4' x 10' beds but the verdict is still out on what I will use for construction. I'm looking at double stacked treated 2x6 pine, untreated 2x6 pine, and rough sawn, wet 2x 7 1/2 white oak. The oak is the cheapest and would fall in between the treated and untreated pine in terms of duration from rotting. Cedar is sky high in cost and some of the other desirable wood like hemlock is not available here. My beds will not be cheap but neither is produce. With the hauling in of good soil they will run in the neighborhood of $150.00 each. I can skimp in terms of depth and soil but I feel if I'm going to go to the work and expense I want to be happy with my beds. I prefer to have my beds over 12"" deep and more like 15" as underneath is a very dense and semi sterile clay. The roots can go down for moisture after I dig it up with a spade  but I do not think they will get much nutrient beneath the bottom of the bed. Since plants often get most of their nutrients in the top layer of soil anyway maybe deep nutrients is not that vital.
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