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Suzanne

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The 2008 Vegetarian Congress
« on: March 06, 2008, 05:36:21 PM »
The 2008 Vegetarian Congress

More than 600 physicians, scientists and nutrition experts from 40 countries will gather at Loma Linda University beginning Tuesday, March 4, 2008 for a 3-day conference on the many benefits of the vegetarian lifestyle.

The Fifth International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition begins with a lecture from a UCLA nutrition expert on how eating broccoli can make up for a genetic flaw that leaves half of us at greater risk of colon and lung cancer.

"This is the biggest and most prestigious conference on vegetarian nutrition anywhere," notes Dr. Neal Barnard, a Washington, D.C., nutrition researcher who will participate. "They have really top nuitrition experts from around the world coming to speak. This is so important that the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, which is the #1 nutrition medical journal in the world, dedicates an entire issue to this conference."

The congress, which is open to the public will take place at the university's Drayson Center, in Loma Linda. The congress was organized 25 years ago by a group of dietitians, hospital administrators and health professionals, many of them Seventh-day Adventists. The original plan called for convening every 5 years as a tool to influence policymakers. The first 2 gatherings were held in Washington, D.C., in 1987 and 1992. The 2008 congress is Loma Linda's third and the first to be held in six years.

"Most medical congresses are financed by the pharmaceutical industry and medical-device manufacturers,s' according to Joan Sabate, who is the congress' chairman, and also is chairman of the Loma Linda University School of Public Health's nutrition department. "Ours is self-funded throuth registration fees."

On the last day of the congress researchers will discuss how climate changes are linked with food production. Led by Annika Carlsson-Kanyama of Sweden's Royal Institute of Technology, Gidon Eshel of the University of Chicago and Loma Linda University's Hal Marlow, scientists will review evidence suggesting that consumers can do more to fight climate change by foregoing steak dinners than they can by replacing SUVs with hybrid cars.

"Scientific research and social events worldwide have accelerated in such a way that this congress will confirm what we anticipated in a session at the last congress, that food choices are probably one of the greatest things we can do on the personal level to improve the chimate-change phenomenon," Sabate said.

Plant-based diets reduce the carbon footprint of mealtime by reducing the CO2 and methane emissions generated by raising cattle and the fuel-related pollution involved in refrigerating beef and the soy and corn needed to feed cattle.

Sabate will present research, from 20 years of clinical trials at Loma Linda, on the health benefits of eating nuts. Eating a handful of almonds, walnuts or pecans daily lowers the risk of heart disease, lowers blood pressure and reduces blood platelets that can lead to cardiovascular disease. They should be unsalted.

Dr. David Heber, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at UCLA, will deliver a keynote address touting his work on nutrition in cancer pervention. "All humans have DNA," he said. "We are all 99.9% genetically identical. But that .1% difference is very significant in that it can impact how we process our foods and may actually influence our predisposition to common forms of cancer."

He pointed out that a gene-formed enzyme in the bodies of about one-half of the world's population provides some protection against lung and colon cancer. Eating three servings a week of broccoli can actually provide more protection than the naturally occurring enzyme supplies, he said.

He noted the fact that many people in the Loma Linda area have a reduced risk for some forms of cancer. Much of the city's large Seventh-day Adventist community follows church-encouraged vegetarian diets which reduce the risk of colon, prostate and breast cancer.

Dr. Neal Barnard will detail his research indicating that eliminating meat can do more to prevent or treat diabetes than the most popular diet change recommended by doctors: cutting out sugar and starchy foods. He notes that the average person has no idea that eating a cheeseburger or a can contribute to diabetes.

Sabate said that in the last years it has become clear that plant-based diets seem to be the most protective for optimal health. --adapted from the Riverside, Calif. Press-Enterprise, March 2, 2008.

Suzanne

Richard Myers

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Re: The 2008 Vegetarian Congress
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2008, 09:10:26 AM »
A plant based diet does indeed help to heal diabetes, type 2. Along with exercise, this can reverse diabetes.

The church recommended "vegetarian diet" ought not be confused with a "plant based" Bible diet. The leukemia virus rampant in dairy disqualifies milk and milk products as a healthy food.  The original diet given to man did not include dairy, eggs, or fish, so parents need to not fear for the health of their children by excluding these unhealthy items from the diet. An intelligent decision to follow a Bible based diet after studying of the needs of the body will be blessed by God. We need not get our calcium and protein second hand from animals. If we do so, we shall put ourselves and our families at risk to contract the diseases they have.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of His Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

colporteur

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Re: The 2008 Vegetarian Congress
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2017, 10:27:04 AM »
Is  "plant based" an accurate description of the diet that is animal free ? I understand that "vegan" has some negative spiritual connotations but is "plant based" accurate for one who eats no meat, dairy or eggs ? It would seem that this description would be accurate for someone who eats largely plants but also eats some meat and dairy. If a person said that they have a " meat based" diet I don't think we would assume that they eat 100% meat and nothing else.  We would say that their menu is built around meat. That is the diet of most Amercians. The "based" means the foundation but not the entire substance. A house may have a block base or foundation. What sits on that foundation could be anything from more blocks, to bricks, to wood or bamboo. To say a "vegan diet" is a "plant based" diet seems inaccurate. One may have a plant based soup with a few pieces of bacon in it or broth. It is still plant based if the main quantity of the soup is plants.  It seems as though "animal free" or a "herbivore diet" would be more accurate.
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Richard Myers

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Re: The 2008 Vegetarian Congress
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2017, 07:34:03 AM »
cp, it often the case that we need to be aware of the fact that Satan is at work to deceive. I usually say I am a strict vegetarian and eat no animal products. But, that does not even come close to letting a chef know what my diet is like. It would allow him to use so many ingredients common in his work that would be injurious. If some are using the term "plant based" to include animal products, that would seem strange. But, I am sure ther are some who may do so. Are you aware of any Seventh-day Adventist health program that does this? I am not. If so, it would be good to know. We would not want to give influence to their program.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of His Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.