Author Topic: Is It The Last Days Or What?  (Read 25172 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Cop

  • Guest
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #80 on: December 15, 2005, 06:15:00 AM »
[You're Safer in Iraq Than in California!]

California Homicides Dwarf Iraq Deaths

The homicide rate in California is 256% higher than the death rate of U.S. and British soldiers in Iraq. This statistic shows that Californians are killing each other at a higher rate than Iraqi insurgents are killing coalition forces.
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=47680


Liane H

  • Regular Member
  • Posts: 2365
    • http://
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #81 on: December 15, 2005, 08:05:00 AM »
I wonder if that number would change if one was to include the number of iraqi people killed by the insurgents?

Liane, the Zoo Mama  

Liane, the Zoo Mama
Romans 8:19   For the earnest expectation of the creature waiteth for the manifestation of the sons of God.

Cop

  • Guest
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #82 on: January 13, 2006, 06:09:00 AM »
New Journeys on Well-Worn Paths
Rediscovering ancient practices in spiritual formation.

Rick Crocker wanted to go home. Two weeks into his sabbatical at a monastery in Pecos, New Mexico, Crocker felt uncomfortable. This was a strange place for a Christian and Missionary Alliance pastor from Erie, Pennsylvania, to find himself. And the schedule of fixed-hour prayer five times a day felt strange. Crocker considered calling it quits, until a conversation with another retreatant convinced the pastor he was out of his element, but still in God's plan.

He's glad he stayed.

"One of the instructors, Bruce Demarest, is a professor at Denver Seminary who had studied spiritual direction there at Pecos," Crocker said. "To spend the time with someone who is thoroughly evangelical in the environment of Benedictine spirituality--ora et labora, prayer and work--with monks and nuns with a charismatic bent was thoroughly refreshing."

Six weeks among them changed the way Crocker views spiritual formation.

We want to make the spiritual disciplines gritty and normal, not just mystical.

"We evangelicals tend to act like nothing existed in church history prior to the Reformation. While this isn't our tradition and we don't agree in all areas of theology and doctrine, there are many things of great value that we can draw from these wells."

And Crocker is not alone in his view.

In the nearly 30 years since Richard Foster wrote the classic Celebration of Discipline, the study of the spiritual practices of the pre-Reformation church has enjoyed a growing audience. To many Protestants at the time, it seemed the Quaker theologian practically invented the disciplines, until his exhortations to solitude, fasting, contemplation, and the like fueled the study of the Desert Fathers, ascetics, and monastics whose teachings were mostly the domain of Catholic spirituality.

"A lot of Protestants have discovered we kind of threw the baby out with the bathwater in the Reformation, in terms of practices," said Presbyterian minister Marjorie Thompson, director for the Pathways Center for Spiritual Leadership. "Now we're coming back and rediscovering them, and turning to our Catholic sisters and brothers because they're the ones with the expertise."

So Protestants in increasing numbers are bringing the classic disciplines into their spiritual practice. Bible-only Baptists are finding Lent, exuberant Pentecostals are employing silence, staid Episcopalians are walking labyrinths, free churches are following lectio divina, and iconoclastic evangelicals everywhere are bringing art back into the sanctuary. Why, after five centuries of stripped-down, theologically precise worship and three decades of rhythm-driven contemporary relevance, are silence and stained glass cool again?

What's driving it? Postmodern church expert Len Sweet framed worship in the 21st century as EPIC: experiential, participatory, image-driven, and communal. His description applies equally to life in emerging churches as it does to the centuries-old monastic communities that birthed these ancient practices. The spiritual connection between the two is what's amazing.

"There is a movement not only back to the disciplines, but a kind of instinctive, if not fully articulated desire to know the whole heritage of Christianity," said Phyllis Tickle, an expert in religious publishing and author of a best-selling series of books on fixed-hour prayer, The Divine Hours.

When Tickle speaks on the disciplines, she starts with Abraham's offering to Melchizedek, showing the Abrahamic roots of what she calls the first discipline, tithing. Tickle finds strong new interest in the ancient practices among Pentecostals, citing the Vineyard denomination in particular, and of course among those under 40. "Over and over I hear from younger Christians, 'Don't give us cheap grace. Give us religion that costs us something.' The laity I hear from may not know Bonhoeffer, but they're using his words."

In Erie, Rick Crocker's congregation continues to grow, both in attendance and spiritual depth, he said. Several early morning prayer meetings have started since the pastor's own personal renewal. Twice yearly Crocker holds an all-day prayer session using the lectio divina. He encourages journaling and silence. And he offers formation classes as part of the midweek Christian education program. Crocker doesn't force his practices on the church, but many are curious.

"I don't think it's a good thing for us to force our pattern of spiritual formation on someone else. We can share what we are learning and encourage others to take a look at it as well. It's kind of unusual for us to be talking in these terms, after all, I'm Christian and Missionary Alliance," Crocker said. "Some of my colleagues think I'm into smells and bells--they may look at me suspiciously--but I'm enjoying the journey. I really am"
(Reed, Leadership Journal, Summer 2005, http://www.christianitytoday.com/le/2005/003 21.44.html


Cop

  • Guest
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #83 on: January 13, 2006, 06:12:00 AM »
What Jesus Would Say

So . . . what do you think Jesus would say to pop singer Madonna? While former reporter and atheist, now assistant pastor at Willow Creek Community Church Lee Strobel admits he's "not pretending to have divine revelation from God on what Jesus would say," his book title, "What Jesus Would Say," gives the impression he has a pretty good idea about what Jesus would say. But, we have to wonder what Jesus he's talking about, because his Jesus sounds more like a pop-psych-pastor than God the Son. Strobel's Jesus identifies Madonna's problem as a self-esteem issue. Self-esteem? That's because it's easier to get someone to come to church if you identify one's problem as low self-esteem instead of sin. And, contrary to what so many pastors-turned-pop-psychologist like Strobel would have you believe, the Bible says: "This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come. For men shall be lovers of their own selves. . ." (2 Timothy 3:1,2).

Christianity is about a loving relationship with the Lord and about loving one another. Christ did not teach his disciples to love themselves, but rather assumed that they already did when he said: "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself" (Luke 10:27). Just as we naturally care for ourselves and want what is good for ourselves, we are to care for others and want what is good for them
http://www.pamweb.org/selflove32.html


WendyForsyth

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 2410
    • http://
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #84 on: January 15, 2006, 01:56:00 PM »
"Over and over I hear from younger Christians, 'Don't give us cheap grace. Give us religion that costs us something.' The laity I hear from may not know Bonhoeffer, but they're using his words."
*******************************************

Although I know this is probably far from your point, I think there is alot that is good in the revival that is to come. Many will be saved outside of the church, the true revival will be outside of the Adventist church, not in it...such as with these young people. Hopefully young people within our church as well. Hopefully they will want to spend all they have for the pearl of great price, sparing naught.

I have no doubt that God considers you to be one of His friends; otherwise He would not trust you with so many crosses, sufferings and humiliations. Crosses are God's means of drawing souls closer to Himself.

Fenelon


Cop

  • Guest
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #85 on: March 24, 2006, 07:44:00 AM »
[Rick Warren's "The Purpose-Driven Life" heresy continues to evolve]

Torkelson: Purpose parties help point way [Excerpts] March 13, 2006

Cocktail napkins . . . coffee, soda and flavored tea close by . . . and copies of a slim, poetry-size book placed invitingly around the room, like a party favor. Looks like a party.

"If I ask you - 'Who are you?' - what would you say?" Linda Graber threw the challenge to the half-dozen women seated around the table. The stories that came back were threaded with good and bad: tales of miscarriages and missed chances, as well as long, good marriages and a new yearning to bring fresh purpose and passion to life.

Graber is co-host, along with Terri Baxter, of the first Purpose Party held in Colorado -- for that matter, among the first held anywhere.

If Purpose Parties sound familiar, it's because they are one degree of separation from Rick Warren's "The Purpose-Driven Life," which has sold more than 22 million copies since 2002. Publishers Weekly calls it "the best-selling hardcover nonfiction book in publishing history."

Among the book's admirers was Warren's research assistant, Katie Brazelton. With her boss' blessing, Brazelton kicked the "Purpose" franchise up a notch by writing Pathway to Purpose and gearing it to women.

Her twist: supplement the book with "Life Purpose Coaching" - a Christian take on the "life coach" idea in which a trained professional helps with everything from career to home organization. In this case, individual coaching runs between $50 and $125 an hour. In group settings they're called Purpose Parties.

"They're like hosting a Tupperware party," Graber says. "We're sharing a process."

The process, using scripture, Christian principles and Brazelton's book, "helps you discover God's purposes for your life and connect them to your passions," according to her Web site. One of her first fans was Graber, a 57-year-old pastor's wife who buttonholes her listeners with a cozy, mile-a-minute story-telling style wrapped in an Oklahoma drawl. Impressed with the book, she zapped out an e-mail to Brazelton's Web site. Lo and behold:

"Oh my gosh, I got a reply from Katie Brazelton herself!" she tells the group.

With winsome candor, Graber shares her own next purpose in life: "I want a house in the mountains and a coaching center where people will pay to come to me."

With 60 Life Purpose coaches scattered throughout several countries, Graber's pastor/husband Eddie also wants some credit for furthering the idea, especially if it ends up with a Colorado address.

"He needles me that if I get rich and famous, he wants everybody to know he bought Katie's book for me."

http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/news_c lumnists/article/0,1299,DRMN_86 _4537316,00.html



Cop

  • Guest
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #86 on: March 24, 2006, 07:48:00 AM »
When is a hate-crime not a hate-crime? Answer: when the powers-that-be say it isn't. [Excerpts]

One problem with hate-crime laws is that they're more the result of bad ideology than good criminology, and nothing illustrates this point better than the current spate of church burnings in Alabama.

As you may know, five churches were burned in rapid succession in the early morning hours of February 3, followed by four more overnight last Monday/Tuesday. Yet, while I had encountered much reportage on this story prior to writing this piece, I had yet to hear any government official or media figure hazard the guess that these acts could constitute a hate-crime. So I did a Google news search.

I entered the terms "church fires" and "hate crime" and, lo and behold, a search engine capable of plumbing the very depths of the Internet found a staggering twenty-two results (as of 2/7). More significantly, all the articles cited only one or the other of a mere two sources that mentioned hate-crime in relation to this arson-targeting of churches.

Twenty-one of the articles mentioned an FBI agent, Charles Regan, who said,

"We're looking to make sure this is not a hate crime and that we do everything that we need to do."

Now, I realize that this was more likely just a manner of speaking than a Freudian Slip, but it seems to me that, when the crime involves a favored group, the powers-that-be look to make sure that it is a hate-crime. And with great zeal too, I might add.

[C]ould you imagine the reaction if nine synagogues or mosques had been thus burned? The monolithic mainstream media would elevate the story to prominence and exhaust themselves pontificating about how dreadful these hate-crimes were. And the posturing by public officials, oh, the posturing, it would be intense enough to induce backache.

http://www.newswithviews.com/Duke/selwyn33.htm

[Is there a double standard when Christianity is involved?]


Cop

  • Guest
Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #87 on: April 10, 2006, 02:35:00 PM »
Court Allows Church's Hallucinogenic Tea [Excerpts]

The Supreme Court ruled unanimously [February 21, 2006] that a small congregation in New Mexico may use hallucinogenic tea as part of a four-hour ritual intended to connect with God.

Justices, in their first religious freedom decision under Chief Justice John Roberts, moved decisively to keep the government out of a church's religious practice. Federal drug agents should have been barred from confiscating the hoasca tea of the Brazil-based church, Roberts wrote in the decision.

The tea, which contains an illegal drug known as DMT, is considered sacred to members of O Centro Espirita Beneficiente Uniao do Vegetal, which has a blend of Christian beliefs and South American traditions. Members believe they can understand God only by drinking the tea, which is consumed twice a month at four-hour ceremonies.

http://www.breitbart.com/news/2006/02/21/D8FTJ9V82.html

[While the use of illicit drugs to contact God is counterproductive to finding the truth, one might also ask why someone would settle for a deity which is only accessible twice a month.]


colporteur

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 6537
Re: Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #88 on: August 14, 2019, 09:34:38 AM »
 Has anyone viewing had experience with Miller and Levine's matetrials ?
It's easier to slow a fast horse down than to get a dead one going.

colporteur

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 6537
Re: Is It The Last Days Or What?
« Reply #89 on: August 14, 2019, 09:38:37 AM »
<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">On Thursday, Miller, along with fellow teachers and scientists cheered a federal judge's ruling that ordered the Cobb County school board to immediately remove the stickers and never again hand them out in any form.</font><HR></BLOCKQUOTE> With the "religious right" gaining more and more influence here in this country I thought that maybe at some point that maybe teaching evolution in the schools might be thrown out or at least have creation taught along side of it. However, with the Pope saying a few years back that evolution could be a possible explination of creation I don't think that the true creation story will ever be taught again since evolution is an excellent way to get rid of the Sabbath.  :(

Miller's Biology book is accepted by the NAD and is being used in our schools. Chapter 15 subtly endorses GMO and has a section on cloning.
It's easier to slow a fast horse down than to get a dead one going.