Author Topic: Keep a look out for.....  (Read 62448 times)

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JimB

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« on: June 20, 2005, 10:21:00 AM »
Here is something new for the sky watchers out there to keep an eye open for. Maybe some of you have seen them and not even realized it.

 

quote:
Noctilucent clouds (NLCs) are a mystery. They hover near the edge of space, far above ordinary clouds. Some researchers believe they're seeded by space dust. Others say they're a sign of global warming. Whatever they are, they're beautiful, and last week's sightings in Europe mark the beginning of the 2005 noctilucent cloud season. Northern summer is the best time to spot them.
Spaceweather.com
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JimB

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« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2005, 10:24:00 AM »
Summer Moon Illusion

The lowest-hanging full moon in 18 years is going to play tricks on you this week.

Step outside any evening at sunset and look around. You'll see a giant moon rising in the east. It looks like Earth's moon, round and cratered; the Man in the Moon is in his usual place. But something's wrong. This full moon is strangely inflated. It's huge!

You've just experienced the Moon Illusion.

Sky watchers have known this for thousands of years: moons hanging low in the sky look unnaturally big. Cameras don't see it, but our eyes do. It's a real illusion.  

Full story at science.nasa.gov

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2005, 05:59:00 AM »
Spectacular Conjunction

Mercury, Venus and Saturn are converging for a spectacular close encounter this weekend.

June 22, 2005: Stick up your thumb and hold it at arm's length. It doesn't seem very big, does it? But it is, big enough to hide three planets.

This weekend Mercury, Venus and Saturn are going to crowd together in a patch of sky no bigger than your thumb. Astronomers call it a "conjunction" and it's going to be spectacular.

The show begins on Saturday evening, June 25th. Step outside and look west toward the glow of the setting sun. Venus appears first, a bright point of light not far above the horizon. As the sky darkens, Saturn and Mercury pop into view. The three planets form a eye-catching triangle about 1.5o long, easily hidden by your thumb. Full Story

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Richard Myers

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« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2005, 01:42:00 PM »
I often wondered why the moon appears so large when rising. Now I think I know?   :)  Thanks for the note, Brother Jim. We will be watching tonight and tomorrow.  

It is also interesting to note that the change in moonrise is so great each nite. I never knew this until reading the link. A lot different than than the sunrise.  :)

Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

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« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2005, 07:00:00 AM »
If you live in the northern US or in Canada and happen to be up late at night, you might want to look north for the possibility of northern lights.  
quote:
Space Weather News for July 14, 2005
http://spaceweather.com

Solar activity has suddenly increased with a series of strong explosions from sunspot 786, including an X-category flare this morning. Because the sunspot is near the sun's western limb, none of the blasts was squarely Earth-directed. Nevertheless, coronal mass ejections hurled into space by these explosions could deliver glancing blows to Earth's magnetic field as early as tonight (July 14-15) and continuing through the weekend, possibly sparking geomagnetic storms and auroras.


By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2005, 02:37:00 PM »
July 22, 2005: Got a calendar? Circle this date: Friday, August 12th. Next to the circle write "before sunrise" and "Meteors!" Attach all of the above to your refrigerator in plain view so you won't miss the 2005 Perseid meteor shower.

The Perseids come every year, beginning in late July and stretching into August. Sky watchers outdoors at the right time can see colorful fireballs, occasional outbursts and, almost always, long hours of gracefully streaking meteors. Among the many nights of the shower, there is always one night that is best. This year: August 12th.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/22jul_perseids2005.htm?list100606

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Sister Marie

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« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2005, 04:26:00 PM »
tHANK you Brother Jim.  :)

------------------
With Christian Love,
Sister Marie

With Christian Love,
Marie

JimB

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« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2005, 06:04:00 AM »
August 4, 2005: If you live in south Florida, central Texas or near the Mississippi River Delta, you're in for a treat. This weekend the space shuttle Discovery and the International Space Station (ISS) are going to orbit over your part of the country. Shining like very bright stars, the two ships will glide in tandem across the sky--a lovely sight.

That's the good news. The bad news is that you have to wake up before dawn to see them, but they're worth waking up for.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/04aug_sightings.htm?list100606

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2005, 01:53:00 PM »
Space Weather News for 5 August 2005
http://spaceweather.com

PERSEID METEORS: Don't forget, the Perseid meteor shower peaks on Friday morning, August 12th. No matter where you live, the best time to look will be during the hours before local dawn when the constellation Perseus is high in the sky. While August 12th is best, the nights before and after the 12th can be good, too. Even now, sky watchers are seeing occasional bright Perseids before dawn.  

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Richard Myers

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« Reply #9 on: August 06, 2005, 01:29:00 PM »
Thanks, Brother Jim, I am going to look!  :)
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

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« Reply #10 on: August 11, 2005, 10:13:00 AM »
Just another reminder for those who find themselves up a littler later than normal.

Space Weather News for August 11, 2005
http://spaceweather.com

The Perseid meteor shower is underway.  The shower's broad peak extends from August 11th through 13th, with August 12th being best.  If you get away from bright city lights and watch the sky between local midnight and dawn on Friday morning, August 12th, you can expect to see dozens to hundreds of meteors.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2005, 08:47:00 AM »
Space Weather News for Sept. 14, 2004
http://spaceweather.com

Sunspot 798/808 flared twice more yesterday, and at least one of the X-class explosions propelled a coronal mass ejection (CME) toward Earth.  NOAA forecasters estimate a 70% chance of severe geomagnetic activity when the CME arrives--perhaps tonight, Sept. 14-15.  Sky watchers at all latitudes should be alert for auroras.

Observing tips:  Although auroras are sometimes bright enough to shine through city lights, you'll see more from a dark-sky site in the countryside.  The best time to look is usually during the hours around local midnight.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2005, 12:59:00 PM »
The Da Vinci Glow

October 4, 2005:
Little-known to most, one of Leonardo's finest works is not a painting or an invention, but rather something from astronomy: He solved the ancient riddle of Earthshine.

You can see Earthshine whenever there's a crescent Moon on the horizon at sunset. Thursday, Oct. 6, is a good night: sky map. Look between the horns of the crescent for a ghostly image of the full Moon. That's Earthshine.

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/04oct_leonardo.htm?list100606

[This message has been edited by JimB (edited 10-05-2005).]

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #13 on: October 24, 2005, 10:39:00 AM »
Space Weather News for Oct. 24, 2005
http://spaceweather.com

HERE COMES MARS: Mark your calendar: On Oct. 30th, Mars makes its closest approach to Earth for the next 13 years.  The view of Mars through backyard telescopes is already spectacular and getting better.  Amateur astronomers are monitoring a big dust storm that is "rewriting the map of Mars" from night to night.  You can see Mars with the unaided eye, too.  It looks like a brilliant orange star rising in the east after sunset.  Visit http://spaceweather.com for pictures and sky maps.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2005, 10:11:00 AM »
Space Weather News for Nov. 13, 2005
http://spaceweather.com

THE LEONIDS: The most famous of all meteor showers, the Leonids, peaks on Thursday, Nov. 17th. A few years ago, the Leonids were storming, filling the skies with bright meteors. But not this year. The 2005 Leonids are expected to be few (less than 20 per hour) and hard to see because of the glaring full Moon.

Nevertheless, if you're an enthusiast, you might want to go outside before sunrise on Nov. 17th and look up. The sparkling stars of northern winter will be on full display, along with Saturn and the full Moon, and you might spot a few meteors, too.

THE MOON & MARS: This is good: The Moon and Mars are getting together for a beautiful close encounter. You can see them rising in the east, side-by-side, at sundown on Monday, Nov. 14th.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2006, 12:51:00 PM »
FIREBALL ALERT: On Sunday morning, Jan. 15th, between approximately
1:56 and 1:59 a.m. PST (0956 - 0959 UT), a brilliant fireball will streak
over northern California and Nevada. It's NASA's Stardust capsule,
returning to Earth with samples of dust from Comet Wild 2. Observers along
the flight path should have a marvelous view of this rare man-made
meteor.  Radio signals reflected from the capsule's ionized tail may be
heard from a much wider area--hundreds to thousands of miles away.  Visit
http://spaceweather.com for maps and observing tips.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2006, 07:38:00 AM »
Space Weather News for March 12, 2006
http://spaceweather.com

LUNAR ECLIPSE:  When the full moon rises on Tuesday evening, March 14th, you might notice something odd--a pale shadow darkening the moon's southern hemisphere. That is the shadow of Earth, and if you can see it,
you've spotted a "penumbral" lunar eclipse.  Weather permitting, the eclipse will be visible from eastern parts of the USA and Canada, all of Europe and Africa, most of Asia and South America, and western
Australia. The eclipse will *not* be visible from California and other far western US states.

BLUE SUN:  Lately, the sun over Egypt has been turning a strange color--blue!  This is a side-effect of very fine particles in the air kicked up by seasonal dust storms. Where there are blue suns, there could be blue moons, too, and maybe even a blue lunar eclipse.  Observers in and around Egypt should keep an eye on the sky in the nights ahead.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2006, 11:40:00 AM »
NASA Science News for March 24, 2006

A cometary "string-of-pearls" will fly past Earth in May 2006 giving astronomers a fantastic view of a comet in its death throes.

FULL STORY at

http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2006/24mar_73p.htm?list845061

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2006, 12:17:00 PM »
Space Weather News for April 20, 2006
http://spaceweather.com

Earth is about to pass through the dusty tail of Comet Thatcher, and
this will cause the annual Lyrid meteor shower. Forecasters expect the
shower to peak on April 22nd, producing about 10 meteors per
hour--modest, but pretty.  The best time to look is during the hours before sunrise
on Saturday morning.  Go to a dark site away from city lights, if
possible.

The Moon will also encounter the comet's tail on April 22nd, which
raises an interesting possibility: Amateur astronomers may be able to spot
flashes of light on the Moon when comet debris hits the lunar surface
and explodes. All that's required is a backyard telescope and lots of
patience.

Visit Spaceweather.com for details, sky maps and observing tips.

Note: This is a Northern Hemisphere shower.  South of the equator,
observers will see very few Lyrids.  Southerners are, however, in an
excellent position to observe Lyrid impacts on the Moon.  The Moon rises high
in southern skies on April 22nd, in plain view of backyard telescopes.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

JimB

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« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2006, 06:39:00 AM »
HERE THEY COME:

More than 60 fragments of dying comet
73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 are racing toward Earth. There's no danger of a collision. At
closest approach on May 12th through 16th, the mini-comets will be 6
million miles away.

That is close enough, however, for a marvelous view through backyard
telescopes.  Many of the fragments are themselves crumbling, producing
clouds of gas and dust mixed with boulder-sized debris. As some fragments
fade, others brighten, surprising onlookers. It's an amazing display.

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}