Author Topic: Meal Timing  (Read 294 times)

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JimB

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Meal Timing
« on: January 04, 2019, 07:47:05 AM »
It's always interesting to see how current science eventually catches up with SOP.

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Our bodies become more insulin resistant throughout the day, Dr. Roizen explains. This means sugar stays in your bloodstream and is transformed into fat. Thatís why, he says, itís best to avoid eating after dark.

In fact, he recommends eating 75 percent of our daily calories before 2 p.m., with breakfast and lunch being our largest meals, and dinner the smallest. Before long, Dr. Roizen assures, it will become habit.

Eat early for the best health, before 2 p.m., and try and eat only when the sun is up. Your body clock shifts to wanting to eat and feeling hungry in the morning, and not hungry in the evening.


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thx4mercy

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Re: Meal Timing
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2019, 05:23:01 PM »
It's always interesting to see how current science eventually catches up with SOP.

I don't think they will ever figure out that it's better for kids to start school at 8 years old, rather than 5 or 6.  Or at least I highly doubt that we'd hear it in the mainstream media.

Actually, a number of years ago I did hear somebody on the radio talking about a study that had been done in Sweden or somewhere that showed that kids did better if they were able to be kids longer before going to school, or something like that.


JimB

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Re: Meal Timing
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2019, 12:31:48 PM »
I don't think they will ever figure out that it's better for kids to start school at 8 years old, rather than 5 or 6.  Or at least I highly doubt that we'd hear it in the mainstream media.

Interesting observation. However, today I ran across this. I couldn't find the original study that they are referencing done by Harvard Medical School but it appears that someone has recognized at least one issue with sending kids to school too early.

The years prior to the age of 7 are critical in the development of strong bodies and minds. If young children are not engaged in active free play, especially outdoors, they are more likely to exhibit problems with social interactions, paying attention, problem-solving, anxiety, controlling their emotions and clumsiness.
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By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}