Author Topic: Climbing the Rock  (Read 1623 times)

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colporteur

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Climbing the Rock
« on: May 23, 2016, 06:24:57 PM »








This old man is not in the pics but made it to the top of the face. The second picture is daughter in white. She made it almost all the way accepting the last short leg. Son in the last picture made it to the top. The last 8-10 feet look easy as one could go to the right and stair step it right up. However, our church member and rock climbing expert insisted that we not do that because if someone slipped they would pendulum swing because ascending to the right is away from the rope and in a slip a pendulum swing could cause someone to get banged up. Therefore the last 3 steps to the left were the greatest challenge. Daughter being shorter could not quite make that as there are fewer hand hold and foot placing options with the shorter arms and legs. She did great however and surpassed all the boys her size and the two older girls. Not bad for first timers.  :-D   In the middle picture our crew ascended another route, anchored and then each repelled down the face to get the idea first of what it is like to come down and depend on the rope and anchor. After that fearful beginning for some all were more brave when we then after started at the face and climbed from the ground up. Special shoes, wedges, harnesses, ropes, and a bag of chalk for the hands strapped around the waist were the tools used.
It's easier to slow a fast horse down than to get a dead one going.

JimB

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Re: Climbing the Rock
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2016, 06:02:23 AM »
Cp, I'm an outdoor person and I've "tried" rock climbing once on a much much smaller rock face. I determined that was one activity I'll stay away from. You might twist my arm to try again but I'm not so sure. :)  Good for you guys. I'm sure the view from the top was worth it.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

colporteur

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Re: Climbing the Rock
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2016, 06:25:23 AM »
Cp, I'm an outdoor person and I've "tried" rock climbing once on a much much smaller rock face. I determined that was one activity I'll stay away from. You might twist my arm to try again but I'm not so sure. :)  Good for you guys. I'm sure the view from the top was worth it.

I learned a great deal in a few hours. On my own I would have concluded the same as yourself. I was scared to death at the top of the rock as we were preparing and I am generally pretty courageous. Compounding the concern of someone falling but even more so that I was going to be put into a position to where lives were dependent on someone who did not know what they were doing. That being me. I had the impression that a great deal was going to be required of me by the expert while he was at the bottom and I at the top harnessing and helping youth some of whom were semi terrified. That was actually good for me because I leaned into the job and my mind was intent. However, my friend was very responsible in not handing me more responsibility than should be and he was there overseeing everything. There was really nothing required of me that was not overseen very carefully. I relaxed and did a good job. Whew !  This was at the repelling stage or the beginning. When we went down and each began to climb quite a bit of the fear was gone howbeit not entirely and that is good. A healthy respect is a good thing. The rock was not a mountain but even so, if you fall 60 feet the end result is the same. I ended up being amazed at what even an athletic beginner can climb in terms of what seemed next to impossible to me. Shoes, chalk, strategy, tenacity, and physical strength and endurance all have there part. While I am out of shape and up there near retirement age I have a lot of natural attributes like excellent strength to weight ratio etc.. That allowed me to do very well and make it to the top. It was a great experience.

     It was interesting that I was even intimidated a bit  crawling out to the edge and look down the face. I did it but was most uneasy. I was also concerned that someone could stubble while walking and fall over the edge. That all eased over time. Knowing what you are doing and having confidence in good equipment is vital to overcoming fear and intimidation. There was certainly a point early on to where I would have been happy to forget this adventure but the expert showed a lot of confidence and that helped.
It's easier to slow a fast horse down than to get a dead one going.