Author Topic: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas  (Read 3145 times)

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Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #20 on: December 06, 2017, 09:45:41 AM »
Amen, Richard! What a powerful parallel that prophecy portrays for us! We can be thankful that Christ's faithful people, if they are beholding the loveliness of Jesus day by day, need not be led astray. Our continual need of Jesus is something each must learn, and we must each exercise saving faith with a surrender of all the heart in order to be saved. Like John, the Lord would not have us hide what we believe and who we are at this time of crisis in the world and in God's church.

As I reflect on what Jesus faced before Annas and the court of Caiphas, I am encouraged to see how John chose not to try to hide that he was a follower of Jesus (he is referring to himself in his gospel as "another disciple"), as Peter tried to do. We need not be ashamed of Jesus, even if it means that we will face persecution. Jesus suffered more keenly than we can imagine, and well would it be for us to behold His loveliness of character that we may be encouraged and strengthened to be His witnesses. Let us let the light of His love shine!

"And Simon Peter followed Jesus, and so did another disciple: that disciple was known unto the high priest, and went in with Jesus into the palace of the high priest" (John 18:15).

"The disciple John, upon entering the judgment hall, did not try to conceal the fact that he was a follower of Jesus. He did not mingle with the rough company who were reviling his Master. He was not questioned, for he did not assume a false character, and thus lay himself liable to suspicion. He sought a retired corner secure from the notice of the mob, but as near Jesus as it was possible for him to be. Here he could see and hear all that took place at the trial of his Lord." {The Desire of Ages, page 711, paragraph 1}


Thankfully, John's presence there meant He could hear and know what was taking place, so he could be an eyewitness and testify of Christ's experience for us in the Scripture. While we are not able to physically see all that Jesus endured for us that led up to His crucifixion, through the word of God, and the beautiful book The Desire of Ages, we are given beautiful glimpses of Jesus that will uplift our souls.
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #21 on: March 03, 2018, 03:30:43 AM »
Jesus tells us what we need; Jesus offers us His grace, but that grace must be received. How? By beholding Him in His infinite loveliness and His infinite suffering to save us from sin. I am so thankful that when we go to sleep at night and ask Jesus to wake us up in the morning, when we hunger and thirst for righteousness, Jesus will wake us so He can fill us. As we realize the loss the disciples sustained in sleeping during the time of Christ's agony, let us heed the lesson and learn our continual need of Jesus--as well as our great need for the time morning by morning spent in communion with Him beholding Him, for this "thoughtful hour" on the life of Jesus, especially the closing scenes, is enabling us to better understand, appreciate, and reflect the character of Christ through a full-heart surrender. What a Savior!

 "It was in sleeping when Jesus bade him watch and pray that Peter had prepared the way for his great sin. All the disciples, by sleeping in that critical hour, sustained a great loss. Christ knew the fiery ordeal through which they were to pass. He knew how Satan would work to paralyze their senses that they might be unready for the trial. Therefore it was that He gave them warning. Had those hours in the garden been spent in watching and prayer, Peter would not have been left to depend upon his own feeble strength. He would not have denied his Lord. Had the disciples watched with Christ in His agony, they would have been prepared to behold His suffering upon the cross. They would have understood in some degree the nature of His overpowering anguish. They would have been able to recall His words that foretold His sufferings, His death, and His resurrection. Amid the gloom of the most trying hour, some rays of hope would have lighted up the darkness and sustained their faith." {The Desire of Ages, page 713, paragraph 4}

When the great trial of faith comes upon God's remnant people, as the 144,000 pass through the time of trouble, well would it be for them to experience the sustaining presence of Christ by having learned to heed the lesson to watch and pray. God has more light and encouragement, more depth of experience, and an increase of vigor and faith yet to be imparted to us as we become more deeply imbued with the Spirit of God.   
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2018, 08:21:36 AM »
Amen, Pastor Sean.  We need to not only be imbued with His Spirit, we need to remember who we are apart from God and how easy it is to forget who He is, and that He is at our right hand to sustain us in our great trials. We are the Remnant of God. As such we are to remember that we have a purpose in these last days that is very different from the mission of the church in days past. Yes, all were and are to be witnesses of God's love and justice, but the last church when Jesus comes will vindicated His character in a manner that will establish God's government for eternity. Never again will sin arise, even though all of His creatures will have free will.

We poor fallible humans are so fallen that it is hard for us to remember both our continual need of Jesus and the power of His grace to keep us from sin. When probation has closed and Satan is allowed to do whatever he wants, except take our lives, we shall remember our need of Jesus and will cling to Him every moment. The story of Job is for this our day. Unlike Job, the Remnant Church of God will not take their eyes off of Jesus and will reveal to the world and the unfallen universe that God's love, His grace, can keep from sin, even the most lowly generation ever to inhabit this planet.

But, if we will develop a character that daily spends a thoughtful hour in the morning beholding the life of Christ, especially the closing scenes such as we are reading today, we will be strengthened and remember who we are and what our mission is. We will not be asleep when Christ calls, nor will we forget that the most weighty trust and the highest honor Christ can bestow upon us, is to partake in His sufferings.

Christ suffered before He died:

    Christ suffered keenly under abuse and insult. At the hands of the beings whom He had created, and for whom He was making an infinite sacrifice, He received every indignity. And He suffered in proportion to the perfection of His holiness and His hatred of sin. His trial by men who acted as fiends was to Him a perpetual sacrifice. To be surrounded by human beings under the control of Satan was revolting to Him. And He knew that in a moment, by the flashing forth of His divine power, He could lay His cruel tormentors in the dust. This made the trial the harder to bear.   
     The Jews were looking for a Messiah to be revealed in outward show. They expected Him, by one flash of overmastering will, to change the current of men's thoughts, and force from them an acknowledgment of His supremacy. Thus, they believed, He was to secure His own exaltation, and gratify their ambitious hopes. Thus when Christ was treated with contempt, there came to Him a strong temptation to manifest His divine character. By a word, by a look, He could compel His persecutors to confess that He was Lord above kings and rulers, priests and temple. But it was His difficult task to keep to the position He had chosen as one with humanity.
     The angels of heaven witnessed every movement made against their loved Commander. They longed to deliver Christ. Under God the angels are all-powerful. On one occasion, in obedience to the command of Christ, they slew of the Assyrian army in one night one hundred and eighty-five thousand men. How easily could the angels, beholding the shameful scene of the trial of Christ, have testified their indignation by consuming the adversaries of God! But they were not commanded to do this. He who could have doomed His enemies to death bore with their cruelty. His love for His Father, and His pledge, made from the foundation of the world, to become the Sin Bearer, led Him to endure uncomplainingly the coarse treatment of those He came to save. It was a part of His mission to bear, in His humanity, all the taunts and abuse that men could heap upon Him. The only hope of humanity was in this submission of Christ to all that He could endure from the hands and hearts of men.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Pastor Sean Brizendine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2018, 02:46:58 AM »
  "The Sanhedrin had pronounced Jesus worthy of death; but it was contrary to the Jewish law to try a prisoner by night. In legal condemnation nothing could be done except in the light of day and before a full session of the council. Notwithstanding this, the Saviour was now treated as a condemned criminal, and given up to be abused by the lowest and vilest of humankind. The palace of the high priest surrounded an open court in which the soldiers and the multitude had gathered. Through this court, Jesus was taken to the guardroom, on every side meeting with mockery of His claim to be the Son of God. His own words, 'sitting on the right hand of power,' and, 'coming in the clouds of heaven,' were jeeringly repeated. While in the guardroom, awaiting His legal trial, He was not protected. The ignorant rabble had seen the cruelty with which He was treated before the council, and from this they took license to manifest all the satanic elements of their nature. Christ's very nobility and godlike bearing goaded them to madness. His meekness, His innocence, His majestic patience, filled them with hatred born of Satan. Mercy and justice were trampled upon. Never was criminal treated in so inhuman a manner as was the Son of God." {The Desire of Ages, page 710, paragraph 1}

Christ revealed His character in contrast to the character of Satan as manifest in those who were under his control. Jesus was calm, patient, and self-possessed. Under the most exciting and trying experiences in His mock trial, Jesus revealed to us how we, abiding in Him, may endure trial. When you are tempted, and feel that retaliation, murmuring, or complaining is ever about to escape your lips, look afresh to Jesus and see His grace--for His loveliness of character is grace! All that Jesus endured is for us, for by beholding His character, by understanding and partaking of this love, we are transformed. We realize how in some degree we have mocked and derided Jesus by our sins; yet we see in Jesus perfection, mercy, and justice being satisfied. He bore our sins so we can, in Him, be set free from sin's guilt and power, and manifest the very traits of character in Him. Christ in us, the hope of glory, makes this possible to each of us when we surrender the whole heart to Him! Praise God!
"When we live by faith on the Son of God, the fruits of the Spirit will be seen in our lives; not one will be missing." {The Desire of Ages, 676.4}

JimB

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2018, 06:40:45 AM »
But a keener anguish rent the heart of Jesus; the blow that inflicted the deepest pain no enemy's hand could have dealt. While He was undergoing the mockery of an examination before Caiaphas, Christ had been denied by one of His own disciples.

 If we are a child of God then we have no desire to inflict such a personal wound on Christ. Do we hate sin enough to shun it with help from Christ so that we won't crucify Him afresh with our sin? I remember a few years when the following quote was shared with me. It struck a deep nerve and still does. Does Christ still suffer when we sin?... take a look...

Christ, the sinless One, was making an infinite sacrifice for sinners, that they might be saved. He came as a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief, and those for whom He came looked upon Him as stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. The cup of suffering was placed in His hand, as if He were the guilty one, and he drained it to the dregs. He bore the sin of the world to the bitter end. And yet men continue to sin, and Christ continues to feel the consequences of their sin as if he Himself were the guilty one. {13MR 369.3}

Shall I Crucify Him?

Shall I crucify my Savior,
When for me He bore such loss?
Shall I put to shame my Savior,
Can I nail Him to the cross?

Are temptations so alluring,
Do earth's pleasures so enthrall,
That I cannot love my Savior
Well enough to leave them all?

'Twas my sins that crucified Him;
Shall they crucify Him yet?
Blackest day of nameless anguish,
And my thankless soul forget?

O, the kindly hands of Jesus,
Pouring blessings on all men!
Bleeding, nail scarred hands of Jesus,
Can I nail them once again?

Shall I crucify my Savior,
Crucify my Lord again?
Once, O once, I crucified Him,
Shall I crucify again?

Mrs. Frank A Breck

By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Dorine

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2018, 07:39:20 AM »
Jim these were my exact thoughts this morning as I read our chapter. That is a beautiful poem. I've never seen it before.



But this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press  toward the mark. Phil. 3:13,14

Richard Myers

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Re: The Desire of Ages--75--Before Annas and the Court of Caiaphas
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2018, 10:30:05 PM »
Does Christ still suffer when we sin?... take a look...

You answered that question nicely, Jim. It is the truth. How can we hurt the One we love? Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not. This ought to cause us great concern.  The question then becomes, what must I do in order to not hurt Him? It is found in this quote.


His love for His Father, and His pledge, made from the foundation of the world, to become the Sin Bearer, led Him to endure uncomplainingly the coarse treatment of those He came to save. It was a part of His mission to bear, in His humanity, all the taunts and abuse that men could heap upon Him. The only hope of humanity was in this submission of Christ to all that He could endure from the hands and hearts of men. 


It was the love of His Father, so it will empower us to not sin. Our love for God will keep us from hurting Him.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.