Author Topic: Starting Seeds  (Read 19421 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #40 on: January 24, 2013, 07:40:43 PM »
Thanks, again, Mark!  I like your idea of starting fall garden seeds in trays. I think it does guarantee a better chance of germination and as I recall, by starting seeds in trays, we can give them a good start as plants by controlling the first pot's soil better than in the ground.

You have gained knowledge about which plants do not do well when transplanting. I think we need to list them so we all will be aware. From experience I have learned that some do not like their roots disturbed at all. So, rather than do my homework, I have just restricted by indoor seed starting to a very few I know will do well. But, how much better to extend the variety so that we can benefit from greater control over the germinating process. You reminded me that when I started collards and kale in the ground this past summer, I was concerned about the high temperature and the seed drying out. Often I was sprinkling twice a day. But, if you miss a time or two, you may reap disaster. Much easier to control in pots where the direct sun is avoided.  Good point and it will cause me to change my seeding habit for the fall garden.  Thanks.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #41 on: January 24, 2013, 07:43:36 PM »
I have been using soaker hose rather than drip emitters in my raised beds.   They seem to be working rather well.  I wonder if others have any ideas about the pros and cons of soaker hose versus drip emitters.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Mark W

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 178
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #42 on: January 27, 2013, 07:15:29 PM »
Sorry for the pause in replies, but things come up that are sometimes more pressing. a rule of thumb on seeds that will and will not transplant well is in relation to its size. Larger seeds seem to have more of a tap root that needs not be disturbed, while small seeds have more of a hair like root structure.

A list that comes to mind would go like this.
Seed hard to transplant; Large seeded
Cucumbers
Cantaloupe
Watermelon
Corn
Beans
And all squash like
Acorn Squash
Butternut Squash
Pumpkin
summer squash
Zucchini
Spaghetti Squash

Now I am not saying that the will not transplant but that they seem to do best direct seeded. I have successfully transplanted many of these varieties but with great care, time limits after germination and special pots. But for the average home gardener direct seeding will give the best results unless your growing season is short and needs manipulated. Most that attempt these varieties as transplants do so for fresh market production where the early harvest is sold for a premium.

As well even though they are mainly small seeded, root crops should be direct sown for obvious reasons as they to tend to have a tap root, with a Jicama being the only root crop I have transplanted, but again with great care.

Now on your question of soaker hose verses drip emitters. I will tell you the truth, the only thing that has a watering system on it in my gardens are  the blueberries, and they have a soaker hole at each plant. I have never used the drip emitters so cannot comment on them. But actually where my gardens are located and the part of the country I am located in, very rarely do I water my gardens. I do have a well if the need arises, but mainly let mother nature run it's course whether good or bad. I would like to hear others thoughts on their water systems and growing tactics as well. God bless

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #43 on: January 27, 2013, 10:09:02 PM »
Thanks for the info on crops that do not do well when transplanted.

As for the need to water the garden in summer......In California it does not rain in the summer.  :)  You are blessed to not have to pay for water for your garden. Why do you have to water your blueberries?
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #44 on: March 06, 2013, 09:11:43 PM »
Often we are starting our seeds indoors when the temperature is still too cold outside. And, even so, we may still need heat for the seeds. I am thinking of a garage or shed rather than in the house. In looking for an efficient method for small scale seed starting, I discovered that some are using Christmas rope lights in a heating bed.  They create their box, place the rope lights in the box, cover the lights with sand and then place the seed flats on top of the sand.  The day after Christmas, you get a real good deal on such things!!  :)   Caution:  make sure the lights are outdoor, in good condition, and plugged into a ground fault breaker outlet.  The flats above the heat bed will be draining water into the sand bed. The heat bed ought provide for drainage also.  source   second plan
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #45 on: December 29, 2013, 12:45:48 AM »
Some seeds require light to germinate, others do not. Here is a chart with a few plants by North Carolina University.  Right click and view a larger image.



Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Cop

  • Senior Moderator
  • Posts: 1239
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #46 on: January 18, 2014, 07:21:19 PM »
We did not plant potatoes this month as we usually do. I recently got my order of tomato and pepper seeds in and will start them next week for planting in March...Lord willing.

We did not have much of a garden last year because I ended up in the hospital after 1 1/2 hours of work and got a big chewing out by my doctor for doing so. My wife just doesn't have the 'touch' to grow much of anything. I hope I am able to do more this year. From the way the economy is going I think we will need anything we can grow.
My religious belief teaches me to feel as safe in battle as in bed. God has fixed the time for my death. I do not concern myself about that, but to be always ready, no matter when it may overtake me....That is the way all men should live, and then all would be equally brave."
Stonewall Jackson

Dorine

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 1384
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #47 on: January 19, 2014, 01:08:55 AM »
Mark, about saving broccoli seed.....Do you save the seed the first year or let it over winter and save that seed? I've done both and have not had much success with germination either way. I don't have any  problems with anything else germinating and if I do I know the reason why but the broccoli baffles me. Out of about 100 seeds only about 12 will germinate. They are fresh, well dried and kept in the fridge.
Thank you for your willingness to share your knowledge and experience.
But this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press  toward the mark. Phil. 3:13,14

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #48 on: January 19, 2014, 10:50:52 AM »
Your right, cop.  The price of food is soaring. $1 a pound for red potatoes. $3 a pound for grapes. $10 pound for pecans. Bleach doubled in price in the last six months.  When the US prints money, it will buy less. That is inflation. And they say there is none!  We are living in the last days. Corruption everywhere.

It would be good to live in the country where you can grow a garden. And, it would be good to learn what each crop needs....before it is too late to make mistakes.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #49 on: January 19, 2014, 11:04:15 AM »
In our Growing Carrots thread, Dorine told us that it takes two years to get carrots to seed. There are other "biennial" plants such as  onion, parsley, Lunaria, silverbeet, Sweet William, colic weed, carrot, and some hollyhocks.
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

Ed Sutton

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 2217
    • Ed Sutton Blogger Profile
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #50 on: February 05, 2014, 04:01:35 PM »
I found a link to a list of seed companies some heirloom some organic some conventional, ask before buying .

  http://www.williamrubel.com/online-vegetable-seed-catalogs/ 
Grateful for Psalms 32 and Titus 2:10 - The divinity of Christ is acknowledged in the unity of the children of God.  {11MR 266.2}

Mimi

  • Regular Member
  • Posts: 27796
  • www.remnant-online.org
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #51 on: February 05, 2014, 04:06:48 PM »
That is a great find, Edward! Thank you!
  For ever, O LORD, thy word is settled in heaven. Psalm 119:89 

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #52 on: February 12, 2014, 11:02:55 AM »
If you have lights and heat, it is a good time to start some seeds. What can you start in your area of the world?
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

colporteur

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 6512
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #53 on: February 12, 2014, 01:43:09 PM »
I'm going to sow onion seeds in doors pretty soon. It is m early but they take a while to get going and you can transplant  them in the garden early. I have three heirloom varieties I will be seeding.
It's easier to slow a fast horse down than to get a dead one going.

Mark W

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 178
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #54 on: February 13, 2014, 03:18:49 PM »
Richard, I live in zone 6b and for this zone my main planting of peppers is Feb. 15th, March 1st. for eggplant and for tomatoes it is March 15th. this seems to work fine for me and works great for late April to early May plant sales. I believe you are in a higher growing zone then me so the dates should be a little earlier.  So if you haven't started your peppers, now is the time to do it for you, and try to put some bottom heat on them for peppers are a little more sensitive to there growing conditions. Let us know how it goes.

Richard Myers

  • Servant
  • Posts: 40064
  • A glorious sunset teaches of trust and faith.....
    • The Remnant Online
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #55 on: February 14, 2014, 02:36:42 PM »
Hello Mark, good to see  your post!!   We have 70 temps and almonds in full bloom.  I see that the South has a little different weather. We are praying for warming in those areas of the world who want warmer weather so they can grow their food.

I have surely appreciated the bottom heat this year. I have seedlings jumping up after a day in the the flats!! Amazing!!!  Can't wait to see them in the ground. I am going to go early this year since we have such warm weather. Going to put up plastic covers just in case.  Back on topic....have many seeds started now. Some have had their first transplant and a few are about ready for their last pot. The cherry tomatoes are going in the ground soon!!! 

Tomorrow is the 15th!!!  I can see you out in the greenhouse just after sunset. What fun!!!
Jesus receives His reward when we reflect His character, the fruits of the Spirit......We deny Jesus His reward when we do not.

JimB

  • Servant
  • Assistant Administrator
  • Posts: 7439
  • Pro 12:28 in the pathway thereof there is no death
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #56 on: February 15, 2014, 05:16:43 PM »
Interesting to read this. I have no idea what zone I'm in but I think if started something inside tomorrow it would be way too soon. We can get frost into late April. Please correct me if I'm wrong.
By communion with God in nature, the mind is uplifted, and the heart finds rest.  {DA 291.1}

Mark W

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 178
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #57 on: February 15, 2014, 09:39:50 PM »
JimB, here is a hardiness map that will give you an idea as to what your zone might be.





http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/ But your zone doesn't sound too much different then mine. Last year I covered tomato plants up on the 4th day of May, just before a snow fell on them, but got to admit last year was a odd one. Richard, great to hear that you have got things up and growing and that things are springing back to life! It was  -2F here several nights back, so it will be a while yet before things thaw out and start greening up. 

Wally

  • Senior Moderator
  • Posts: 5403
  • Romans 8:35, 38, 39
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #58 on: February 16, 2014, 03:22:33 AM »
Although this hardiness zone map is better than most, it should be noted that it is only an approximation.  Your zone could be off one way or another depending on a number of factors.  As near as I can tell from the map, I'm on the edge of zone 4b and 5a.  We're on a hill, about 350' higher than the valley below.  Most winters we don't even hit -20.  But less than 2 miles from here, down in the valley, they're on the edge of zone 4a/3b.  On a clear night, with no wind, I've seen it as much as 15 colder at the bottom of the hill than at my house.  My first frost date is 3-4 weeks later than down there.  I don't know how it is in Michigan, but we have many micro-climates here in Maine, and only by living here awhile or quizzing many people can you get an accurate picture.
So likewise ye, when ye shall have done all those things which are commanded you, say, We are unprofitable servants:  we have done that which was our duty to do.  Luke 17:10

colporteur

  • Full Member
  • Posts: 6512
Re: Starting Seeds
« Reply #59 on: February 16, 2014, 06:12:57 AM »
JimB;

Our last frost date is May 20th. I think it depends on what you are planting  and how carefully you protect your  plants when transplanted in the garden. I like to put my tomato plants out early enough so that I may have to cover them a time or two. I am starting my onion seedlings now because they take  a while to get to a good size and onion and garlic are very hardy as is parsley, Kale  and cabbage crops. I would think you could seed your tomatoes any time from now until mid March. I like to seed my tomatoes about 8-10 weeks before last frost date.
It's easier to slow a fast horse down than to get a dead one going.